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“Innate” – One Word That Changes Everything, Baron A Rohbock

Are leaders born or made? I have the answer! Baron A Rohbock

 

baron a rohbock

Baron graduated with honors in Business Administration and Leadership. With a passion for training and working with teams, he entered the Learning and Development field as Director of Training for Taylor Hartman, author of The People Code (previously published as The Color Code).
With a wide breadth of knowledge in leadership, Baron returned to the training industry to combine first hand management and executive leadership experience with a passion for working with people to shape results while revealing individual and collective talent. In 2011 he started Core MotivAction, an innovative brilliant training company dedicated to people and team development.

Managing Risk – Just Remember STARR

 

managing risk

Fortunately, there are a number of techniques for handling risks. The nature of a specific risk and the circumstances (extent of exposure, available resources, and so forth) often dictate which technique, or combination of techniques, is most appropriate. Basically, there are five methods for dealing with risk. It is easy to remember these by thinking of the acronym STARR.

 

Sharing—Sometimes, when a risk cannot be avoided and retention would involve too much exposure to loss, we may choose risk sharing as a means of handling the risk. By sharing risk with someone else, an individual also shares potential losses. That is, the individual’s own loss may not be as great if it occurs, but the individual may have to pay a portion of the losses experienced by others.

 

Transfer—Risk transfer means transferring the risk of loss to another party, usually an insurance company, that is more willing or able to bear the risk. Some non-insurance transfers of risk occur, such as when one agrees to assume the risk of another under the terms of a written contract.

 

Avoidance—As the name implies, this technique deals with risk by avoiding the risk in the first place. This usually means not undertaking an activity that could involve the chance of loss. For example, by never flying, one could eliminate the risk of being in an airplane crash.

 

Reduction—Sometimes, when risks cannot be avoided, they can be reduced. Risk reduction can work in one of two ways: it can reduce the chance that a particular loss will occur, or it can reduce the amount of a potential loss if it occurs. For example, installing a smoke alarm in a home would not lesson the possibility of fire, but it would reduce the risk of the loss from the fire.

 

Retention—Retention simply means doing nothing about the risk. In other words, people assume or retain the risk and, in effect, become self-insurers. For example, the insured would pay a smaller portion of the loss than the insurer, such as paying a deductible.

 

What if… We knew the difference between leadership and management?

What if… We knew the difference between leadership and management?

 

leadership and management

Presenter: Tony Mortensen, Director of the Executive Development Programmes

 

· What is strategic leadership?
· What is effective management?
· Do organisations know the difference?
· What is best for achieving sustainable growth?

 

The last decade has seen an exponential increase in the number of courses offered in the area of organisational leadership, with almost every major business school worldwide now offering specialised training in this area. Do organisations truly understand the key difference between leadership and management? Do they understand what is needed in their organisation to achieve efficiency, profitability and sustainable growth? If we employ skilled people to undertake the different tasks in an organisation do we really need to manage those people or are we better off allowing them to do what we employed them to do. The flip side of this is that if we do not manage these people effectively then the organisation runs the risk of becoming less efficient and effective at providing society with the desired outcomes.
At odds with both these ideas is the fact that New Zealand is now seen as one of the hardest working countries in the OECD, yet our productivity continues to fall. Therefore, are organisations getting the best from their human resource or are we as a society destined to be out-performed?
Tony has over 18 years’ experience in accounting, management and education and is now responsible for executive training through the Master of Business Administration (MBA), Postgraduate Certificate in Strategic Leadership, Master of Business Management (MBM), Master of Professional Accounting (MPA) and Executive Education (short courses).

 

When life throws you a curve-ball… David Ecker

When life throws you a curve-ball… David Ecker

 

 

When life throws you a curve-ball, either you have to duck, or learn to hit curve balls

 

 

David Ecker is a Stony Brook graduate who previously served as the Interim Director/Manager of Client Support for over 10 years and led the Project 50 Managed Output initiative. He focuses on strategic planning, partnering with researchers and developing best practices for the research community.

 

Harvard Business Review: #1 Key to Motivation

Harvard Business Review: #1 Key to Motivation

 

In a multi-year study, researchers at the Harvard Business School first asked 600 managers from dozens of different companies to rank the impact of five factors that are normally associated with motivation – recognition, incentives, support from managers and colleagues, clear goals and a sense of making progress. In this first phase of the study, recognition for good work was ranked by managers as the most important factor in motivation.

Seth Godin on the Difference Between Leadership and Management

Seth Godin on the Difference Between Leadership and Management

 

 

Bestselling author Seth Godin says that “Management and leadership are totally different things. You think you are being a leader, but you are probably being a manager.”
 
He goes on to say, “Managers figure out what they want done and get people to do it. Managers try to get people to do what they did yesterday, but a little faster and a little cheaper with a few less defects.” But this is not leadership.

Truly human leadership: Bob Chapman

Truly human leadership: Bob Chapman

 

Robert Chapman is chairman and CEO of Barry-Wehmiller Companies, Inc., a $1.5 billion global manufacturer of capital equipment and provider of engineering consulting. Under Chapman’s leadership, Barry-Wehmiller has used strategic acquisitions and organic growth to achieve a 20% compound growth rate during the past 20 years. At the heart of its successful economic model, however, are more than 7000 outstanding team members worldwide. The company prides itself and is fiercely committed to building great people through its distinctive people-centric leadership initiatives and innovative learning institute, Barry-Wehmiller University.The 127-year-old company was named one of the Best Places to Work in St. Louis because of its programs in leadership and motivation.

Ivan Lansberg on “Ambidextrous Leadership”

Ivan Lansberg on “Ambidextrous Leadership”

 

 

Ivan Lansberg contends that effective leadership of a family enterprise requires a skill set which has not been adequately described in the business literature.

 

 

More specifically, he notes that leaders in a family enterprise are required to attend to the leadership needs of both the enterprise and the family. The enterprise needs the leader to lead, for example, the process of succession, while the family needs the leader to lead, for example, the nurturing and development of the next generation, the support of elderly parents, and the planning of family events. Most leaders are better at leading either the enterprise or the family, but few are naturally inclined in both areas. Lansberg calls for family enterprise leaders to become “ambidextrous leaders” — to build their skills in both arenas. This can allow the family enterprise to take advantage of the paradoxes of a family enterprise and turn these potentially confounding ambiguities into strategic advantages.

 

What if Fear Were Just a Feeling?: Terri Cole

What if Fear Were Just a Feeling?: Terri Cole

 

 

Terri Cole is a licensed psychotherapist known for her holistic approach, combining practical psychology, thought innovation, and harnessing the power of intention to create sustainable change. She has a unique ability to take complex theories and translate them into actionable steps you can implement into your daily life.

Brian Klapper: “The Q-Loop”

Brian Klapper: “The Q-Loop”

The business environment has never been more fast-paced and competitive. Survival, let alone success, depends on an organization’s ability to recognize possibilities, innovate, implement change, and sustain that transformation. Yet a paradox exists. How does an established organization filled with long-time employees, a deeply entrenched culture, and a history of drawn-out planning and development cycles become nimble, innovative, and responsive? In The Q-Loop Brian Klapper reveals the “art and science” of lasting transformation based on a proven, repeatable model. Learn how to unlock the potential of your organization’s collective intelligence to create buy-in from top to bottom. The Q-Loop extracts the deep knowledge that resides with front line employees, breaks down their inherent resistance to change, and converts them into passionate advocates who are fully invested in leading the organization to achieve transformational results.

About the Speaker: Brian is the President and Founding Partner of The Klapper Institute. He is an internationally recognized expert in transformational change, working with a variety of global companies in financial services, consumer products, manufacturing, food service, utilities, retail, and healthcare. His experience spans all elements of the value chain, as well as all customer touchpoints. A recognized thought leader, Brian is currently working on a new book that provides insights on the complex cultural and operational issues that companies must address to achieve and sustain transformational change.

Before founding The Klapper Institute, Brian was the President of The Tatham Group, a boutique process redesign firm. Previously, he was a Partner at Mercer Management Consulting (formerly Strategic Planning Associates, now Oliver Wyman) focusing on strategy development and operational transformation.