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The shocking truth about your health: Lissa Rankin

The shocking truth about your health: Lissa Rankin

lissa rankin

 

Lissa Rankin, MD is an OB/GYN physician, author, keynote speaker, consultant to health care visionaries, professional artist, and founder of the women’s health and wellness community OwningPink.com. Discouraged by the broken, patriarchal health care system, she left her medical practice in 2007 only to realize that you can quit your job, but you can’t quit your calling. This epiphany launched her on a journey of discovery that led her to become a leader in the field of mind/body medicine, which she blogs about at OwningPink.com and is writing about in her third book Mind Over Medicine: Scientific Proof You Can Heal Yourself (Hay House, 2013).

 

She teaches both patients and health care professionals how to make the body ripe for miracles by healing the mind and being healthy in all aspects of life, not just by promoting healthy behaviors like good nutrition, exercise, and adequate sleep, but by encouraging health and authenticity in relationships, work, creative expression, spirituality, sexuality, finances, and living environment. She is leading a revolution to feminize how health care is received and delivered by encouraging collaboration, fostering self-healing, reconnecting health care and spirituality, empowering patients to tap into the mind’s power to heal the body, and encouraging women not to settle for being merely well, but to strive for living vital, joyful, authentic lives full of “mojo.”

 

When not spreading the word, she chills out, paints, does yoga, and hikes in Marin County, CA with her husband and daughter.

 

Introducing the concept of a Collaborative Will by Tom Deans

Introducing the concept of a Collaborative Will

by Tom Deans

Last Will and Testament

At a farm convention in Chicago, I was approached by an audience member who explained that gifting a working farm to her children was preferable to selling and leaving them each $5 million. When I pressed her for more details – such as – “what do your children think of your plan?” She snapped her head back and proclaimed, “why would I tell them?”

 

I have to confess it wasn’t the first time that I had heard someone say that silence was going to be the key ingredient of their estate plan. It got me thinking how many beneficiaries – children especially — truly know the contents of their parent’s wills?

 

When I put the question to my audiences, “how many people hold a copy of their parents’ wills?” Only 10% on average acknowledge they do. The more interesting question is: “how many in the audience will play a lead or significant role in providing care for an aging parent?” The response — an average of 75% — agreed they would. I find the disparity between these two pieces of data, striking.

 

The relationship between inheriting money and the provision of health care is an issue moving into the media and cultural spotlight for two major reasons – we’re living longer (a lot longer) and the cost of health care and assisted living are rising faster than inflation and saving rates.

 

For some who live much longer than the average age of 76 for men and 81 for woman, many will turn to family for financial support and care when their savings are fully depleted – the same family from whom secrets were kept when a surplus seemed assured.

 

Why do so many people keep secrets from those who will likely be providing them with late in life care? How do secrets serve beneficiaries or add to relationships before we become old and dependant? Talk to enough estate planning professionals and they’ll tell you it almost always comes down to a lack of trust and a debilitating fear of death.

 

For those who view their money as an absolute source of power and control you can see how the aging process and the concomitant relinquishing of power and control makes dying and death such a wretched, fearful experience. Compare that to individuals who seriously prepare family, friends and charitable organizations to receive not just their wealth but their wisdom and you’ll find some extraordinary relationships built purposefully over a lifetime – even when years outstrip savings.

 

Sharing the contents of a will requires judgment – some might call it wisdom nurtured over time. A wisdom both taught and harvested through conversations with intended beneficiaries not in the last year of life, when death seems imminent, but precisely the opposite, when death is a distant abstraction.

 

A will doesn’t need to be seen as a solo “end of life document” but rather a collaborative work of art monumentally improved by living in relationship with our intended beneficiaries.

 

It is the act of collaboration, supported through frequent and deliberate conversation about the future that we leave something more valuable than just our money. This is, in part, how our fear of death recedes when we know with confidence that our beneficiaries—our emissaries — will take our ideas and perhaps our surplus assets at death and live purposeful lives themselves.

 

Have you shared the contents of your will with your intended beneficiaries – the ones likely to be providing late in life care for you?

 

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My Vet sends me reminder letters … Why can’t my lawyer when it comes to my will? by Tom Deans

My Vet sends me reminder letters … Why can’t my lawyer when it comes to my Will?

Willing Wisdom

Leading up to the release of my new book Willing Wisdom, I paid extra attention to the mail I received. Delivered to my home over the course of three months, were reminder letters from a host of personal service suppliers, including my accountant to file my taxes, my window cleaner, my lawn service, my insurance provider and my veterinarian.

 

What I didn’t receive, in fact what I’ve never received over the course of my 51 years on the planet, is a letter from my lawyer reminding me to up-date my will. Curious to know if I’m special (and not in a gifted way) I recently asked my audience – about 200 business owners from across North America assembled at a convention in La Jola California – how many of them had received an annual letter from their lawyer reminding them to up-date their will? Only seven hands shot up.

 

The results confirmed my suspicion that, like me, 193 people in that room had windows and pets receiving better regularly scheduled maintenance than their estate plans. So what’s the deal?

 

More alarming is that when questioned on the subject, half of that room acknowledged they didn’t have a will at all. When pressed further, 50% of those who did have a will confessed that it had been more than 5 years since it was last up-dated. When questioned even further almost the entire room confessed to having clean windows, healthy pets and weed free lawns.

 

Approximately 125 million North Americans over the age of 18 have no will and will eventually die intestate. The resulting financial and relational devastation to families is incalculable.

 

When I asked my veterinarian how she could be so organized and proactive in scheduling my pet’s annual check-up she tilted her head side ways (kind of like the way my dog Goblin does when I say “treats”) she blurted out – “auto-scheduler”. She might as well have added …“duhhh.”

 

Asking her for detail on this cutting edge 25-year-old technology she noted it was free — as in it doesn’t cost anything.

 

Below is the letter I received from my veterinarian word for word.


————
To: Tom Deans

Annual physical examinations and a personal health consultation is integral to maintaining Goblin’s health. Please call our office to schedule an appointment. We’ve missed you and look forward to seeing you soon!

Dufferin Veterinary Hospital
————

 

If you’re not receiving a letter from your lawyer reminding you to up-date your will, would you consider forwarding this article to your lawyer and help them get acquainted with the power of “auto-scheduling” and helping clients keep their estate plans up-to-date? Here’s a sample letter for them to consider sending annually to clients like you.


————
Dear client:

A will is one of the most important legal documents for you and your family to consider. If one or more of the following apply to you, please call our office and schedule an appointment.

 

In the past year have you experienced?

 

- the birth of a child, grandchild or other close family member?
– has someone close died?
– have you acquired or sold a business?
– has your financial situation materially changed?

 

There are many other changes in your life that may affect your will that we would be pleased to discuss, including Powers of Attorney, Advanced Health Care Directives and the selection of Executor(s).

 

I look forward to meeting with you.

 

Sincerely,

 

Your Lawyer Who Totally Gets that You are Busy and Reluctant to Think, Talk and Up-Date Your Will.
————

And while you’re at it, please remind your lawyer that no less than four US Presidents died without a will — two were lawyers.

 

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The LFO 2013 Speaker of the Year Award Winner,  

 

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of your events, please click here.

 

The future of health is here today: John Lewis, Ph.D.

The future of health is here today: John Lewis, Ph.D.

 

the future of health

John Lewis, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Dr. Lewis is the principal investigator of several nutrition, dietary supplement, and exercise studies.

 

Imaginable intelligence – everyone deserves to be heard: Lisa Domican

Imaginable intelligence – everyone deserves to be heard: Lisa Domican

 

lisa domican

 

 

Lisa Domican is a Wicklow-based mother of two autistic children. She set up the company Grace App Communication, and developed a simple picture communication app in collaboration with a successful games developer that allows non verbal people with Autism and other disabilities to communicate effectively. In interacting with people with autism, Lisa advocates in ‘the 3 As’: Awareness, Acceptance and making Allowances. She hopes through using these steps people can help reduce the challenges that make having living with autism in a world designed for “normal” people so stressful.

 

Sleep deprivation & disparities in health, economic and social wellbeing: Lauren Hale

Sleep deprivation & disparities in health, economic and social wellbeing: Lauren Hale

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Is anyone getting enough sleep? What difference does it make? Everyone knows what it feels like when you have a rough night but are there larger implications? Sleep researcher, Dr. Lauren Hale, talks animatedly about the social patterning of sleep and how it contributes to a cycle of inequality in health and well-being. With funding from National Institute for Child Health and Development, National Institute for Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, and the National Institute of Aging, she analyzes demographic, behavioral, and neighborhood data from large-scale studies to identify patterns of sleep and wellness in child, adolescent, adult, and aging populations. Dr. Hale suggests that the results raise concerns about public health and social justice; she also presents some initial thoughts on what we, as individuals and a society, might do about it. Dr. Hale has published over 45 published peer-reviewed articles in Sleep, Sleep Medicine Reviews, Journal of Sleep Research, Pediatrics, among numerous other peer-reviewed journals. Dr.Hale is Associate Professor of Preventive Medicine at Stony Brook University where she is Core Faculty in the Program in Public Health. She received her PhD from Princeton University. She also serves on the Board of Directors for the National Sleep Foundation.

 

Elucidate: Method of recording brain activity could lead to mind-reading devices

neurosciencestuff:

A brain region activated when people are asked to perform mathematical calculations in an experimental setting is similarly activated when they use numbers — or even imprecise quantitative terms, such as “more than”— in everyday conversation, according to a study by…

Elucidate: Method of recording brain activity could lead to mind-reading devices

 

Neuroscience: Faulty stem cell regulation may contribute to cognitive deficits associated with Down syndrome

neurosciencestuff:

The learning and physical disabilities that affect people with Down syndrome may be due at least in part to defective stem cell regulation throughout the body, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The defects in stem cell growth and self-renewal observed by the…

Neuroscience: Faulty stem cell regulation may contribute to cognitive deficits associated with Down syndrome

 

Neuroscience: Finally mapped: The brain region that distinguishes bits from bounty

neurosciencestuff:

In comparing amounts of things — be it the grains of sand on a beach, or the size of a sea gull flock inhabiting it — humans use a part of the brain that is organized topographically, researchers have finally shown. In other words, the neurons that work to make this “numerosity” assessment are…

Neuroscience: Finally mapped: The brain region that distinguishes bits from bounty

 

Kelly McGonigal: How to make stress your friend

Kelly McGonigal: How to make stress your friend

 

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Stress. It makes your heart pound, your breathing quicken and your forehead sweat. But while stress has been made into a public health enemy, new research suggests that stress may only be bad for you if you believe that to be the case. Psychologist Kelly McGonigal urges us to see stress as a positive, and introduces us to an unsung mechanism for stress reduction: reaching out to others.

Kelly McGonigal translates academic research into practical strategies for health, happiness and personal success.

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO HER?

Stanford University psychologist Kelly McGonigal is a leader in the growing field of “science-help.” Through books, articles, courses and workshops, McGonigal works to help us understand and implement the latest scientific findings in psychology, neuroscience and medicine.

Straddling the worlds of research and practice, McGonigal holds positions in both the Stanford Graduate School of Business and the School of Medicine. Her most recent book, The Willpower Instinct, explores the latest research on motivation, temptation and procrastination, as well as what it takes to transform habits, persevere at challenges and make a successful change.

She is now researching a new book about the “upside of stress,” which will look at both why stress is good for us, and what makes us good at stress. In her words: “The old understanding of stress as a unhelpful relic of our animal instincts is being replaced by the understanding that stress actually makes us socially smart — it’s what allows us to be fully human.”