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Rewiring Your Brain: Michael Weisend

Rewiring Your Brain: Michael Weisend

 

A neuroscientist at the Wright State Research Institute, Michael Weisend is an expert in neuroimaging with magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) both in a clinical setting and for research into the mechanisms of learning, memory and epilepsy. In recent years, he has used this expertise to develop neuroimaging-guided, non-invasive brain stimulation strategies to enhance memory and other aspects of human performance.  

Suzana Herculano-Houzel: What is so special about the human brain?

Suzana Herculano-Houzel: What is so special about the human brain?

The human brain is puzzling — it is curiously large given the size of our bodies, uses a tremendous amount of energy for its weight and has a bizarrely dense cerebral cortex. But: why? Neuroscientist Suzana Herculano-Houzel puts on her detective’s cap and leads us through this mystery. By making “brain soup,” she arrives at a startling conclusion.

Suzana Herculano-Houzel shrunk the human brain by 14 billion neurons — by developing a new way to count them.

 

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO HER?

 

How many neurons make a human brain? For years, the answer has been (give or take) 100 billion. But neuroscientist Suzana Herculano-Houzel decided to count them herself. Her research approach involved dissolving four human brains (donated to science) into a homogeneous mixture — in her lab at the Institute of Biomedical Sciences in Rio de Janeiro, they call it “brain soup.” She then took a sample of the mix, counted the number of cell nuclei belonging to neurons, and scaled that up. Result: the human brain has about 86 billion neurons, 14 billion fewer than assumed — but intriguingly, far more than other animals, relative to brain size.

 

She suggests that it was the invention of cooking by our ancestors — which makes food yield much more metabolic energy — that allowed humans to develop the largest primate brain. She’s now working on elephant and whale brains to test her hypothesis.

 

The social brain and its superpowers: Matthew Lieberman, Ph.D.

The social brain and its superpowers: Matthew Lieberman, Ph.D.

 

matthew lieberman ph d

 

Neuroscientist Matthew Lieberman explains that through his studies he’s learned that our kryptonite is ignoring the importance of our social superpowers and by building on our social intuition, we can make ourselves smarter, happier, and more productive. In this TEDx Talk, Lieberman explores groundbreaking research in social neuroscience that reveals that our need to connect with other people is even more fundamental than our need for food or shelter and that the social pain and pleasure we experience has just as much impact as physical pain and pleasure.

Elucidate: Method of recording brain activity could lead to mind-reading devices

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A brain region activated when people are asked to perform mathematical calculations in an experimental setting is similarly activated when they use numbers — or even imprecise quantitative terms, such as “more than”— in everyday conversation, according to a study by…

Elucidate: Method of recording brain activity could lead to mind-reading devices

 

Neuroscience: Finally mapped: The brain region that distinguishes bits from bounty

neurosciencestuff:

In comparing amounts of things — be it the grains of sand on a beach, or the size of a sea gull flock inhabiting it — humans use a part of the brain that is organized topographically, researchers have finally shown. In other words, the neurons that work to make this “numerosity” assessment are…

Neuroscience: Finally mapped: The brain region that distinguishes bits from bounty

 

Rethinking the brain: Richard Faull

Rethinking the brain: Richard Faull

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Richard Faull is professor and director of the Centre for Brain Research at the University of Auckland. Raised in a small Taranaki farming community, Richard discovered his passion for the human brain as a young medical student and has spent his life pursuing exciting, innovative and groundbreaking research in this field at the University of Auckland. Richard’s work has been widely recognised internationally and through appointments as Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand, Officer of the NZ Order of Merit, and receiving of many awards including New Zealand’s highest scientific award, the Royal Society Rutherford Medal.

Neuroscience: Why We Look At The Puppet, Not The Ventriloquist

neurosciencestuff:

The brain doesn’t require simultaneous visual and audio stimulation to locate the source of a sound

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As ventriloquists have long known, your eyes can sometimes tell your brain where a sound is coming from more convincingly than your ears can.

A series of experiments in humans and monkeys…

Neuroscience: Why We Look At The Puppet, Not The Ventriloquist

Why Does My Brain Sleep?

Why Does My Brain Sleep?

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Abstract:
We spend one third of our lives asleep, yet doctors and scientists still have no complete understanding as to why. It is one of the last great scientific mysteries. This talk will describe new discoveries suggesting that, far from being a time when the brain is dormant, sleep is a highly active process critical for a constellation of different functions. These include the importance of sleep for learning, memory and brain plasticity. Furthermore, a role for sleep in intelligently synthesizing new memories together will be examined, the result of which is next-day creative insights. Finally, a new role for sleep in regulating emotional brain networks will be discussed, optimally preparing us for next day social and psychological challenges.

Bio:
Matthew Walker earned his PhD in neurophysiology from the Medical Research Council in London, UK, and subsequently became an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Harvard Medical School in 2004. He is currently an Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of California Berkeley. He is the recipient of funding awards from the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health. In 2006 he became a Kavli Fellow of the National Academy of Sciences. His research examines the impact of sleep on human brain function in healthy and disease populations.

 

How to manually change a memory: Steve Ramirez and Xu Liu

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Steve Ramirez and Xu Liu shoot laser beams into the brains of living mice to activate and manipulate their memories. In a funny and — perhaps — unnerving talk from TEDxBoston, they explain the fundamental principles behind their experiments and broach the big questions that future advancements in this line of research may force us to answer.

When we close our eyes and think back to our childhood, to our first kiss, or to this morning’s breakfast, our brains perform the remarkable task of mental time travel and thereby enrich our lives with memories. How does neural machinery give rise to something as seemingly ephemeral as memory? Recently, Hollywood inspired our imaginations by proposing that memories could be artificially triggered (think Total Recall), erased (think Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind), or even implanted (think Inception). Now, neuroscience has plucked these ideas from the tree of science fiction and grounded them in experimental reality. The catch: our subjects are the movie stars of the laboratory setting–rodents. This talk will introduce how revolutionary techniques from our lab have made it possible to isolate and manipulate specific memories at the level of single brain cells with just flickers of light, as well as the societal ramifications of doing so.

How to look inside the brain – Carl Schoonover

How to look inside the brain – Carl Schoonover

There have been remarkable advances in understanding the brain, but how do you actually study the neurons inside it? Using gorgeous imagery, neuroscientist and TED Fellow Carl Schoonover shows the tools that let us see inside our brains.

 

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