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  • Chris Anderson of WIRED on tech’s Long Tail

    Chris Anderson, the editor of WIRED, explores the four key stages of any viable technology: setting the right price, gaining market share, displacing an established technology and, finally, becoming ubiquitous. As editor of WIRED, Chris Anderson is an authority on emerging technologies and the cultures that surround them. Why you should listen to him: Before Chris Anderson took over as editor of WIRED, he spent seven years at The Economist, where he worked as editor of both the technology and business sections. Anderson holds a degree in physics and has conducted research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and has done stints at the leading journals Nature and Science. He’s perhaps most famous for coining the term “the long tail,” a whiteboard favorite that describes the business strategy of pursuing many little fish (versus a few big fish), as typified by both Amazon and Netflix. Anderson first introduced the term in an article written for WIRED in 2004; the book-length version, The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business Is Selling Less of More, became a bestseller. He maintains a blog, The Long Tail, which he updates with impressive regularity.

     
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  • David S. Rose on pitching to VCs

    Thinking startup? David S. Rose‘s rapid-fire TED U talk on pitching to a venture capitalist tells you the 10 things you need to know about yourself — and prove to a VC — before you fire up your slideshow. “The Pitch Coach” David S. Rose is an expert on the business pitch. As an entrepreneur, he has raised millions for his own companies. As an investor, he has funded millions more. Why you should listen to him: David S. Rose is a split-screen legend to the world’s entrepreneurs. He’s been both a mentor to hundreds of startup hopefuls and, sometimes — to the talented and fortunate — a funder. His rapid-fire seminars on pitching to venture capitalists are celebrated and sought-after. He’s helped invest many millions of dollars in startups through New York Angels (companies like Peter Diamandis‘ ZERO-G), meanwhile raising tens of millions for his own companies. Fusing these interests under Rose Tech Ventures, Rose’s mission is to give future movers-and-shakers support and encouragement. Angelsoft connects entrepreneurs to tens of thousands of angel investors in 45 countries; his new technology incubator is a “greenhouse to nurture the seedlings of future entrepreneurial superstars,” and Egret Capital Partners goes beyond New York’s “Silicon Alley” to fund more established companies across North America. If you want to supercharge your leadership skills — even if you’ve made your fortune — his public seminars are presented through the Liminal Group. “A world-conquering entrepreneur.”   BusinessWeek Related articles Here’s How Much Startup Founders Are Allowed To Pay Themselves (businessinsider.com) Venture Capital: A Few Things to Remember (growthology.org) Tip from a VC: Raise More by Asking for Less (starkravingvc.com) Ideas aren’t worthless (bernardi.me)  

     
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  • Nigel Marsh: How to make work-life balance work

    Work-life balance, says Nigel Marsh, is too important to be left in the hands of your employer. Marsh lays out an ideal day balanced between family time, personal time and productivity — and offers some stirring encouragement to make it happen. Why you should listen to him: Nigel Marsh is the author of “Fat, Forty and Fired” and “Overworked and Underlaid.” He’s the Regional Group CEO of Young and Rubicam Brands for Australia & New Zealand. In 2005 he came second last in the Bondi to Bronte ocean race.

     
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  • Tim Leberecht: 3 ways to (usefully) lose control of your brand

    Tim Leberecht: 3 ways to (usefully) lose control of your brand The days are past (if they ever existed) when a person, company or brand could tightly control their reputation — online chatter and spin mean that if you’re relevant, there’s a constant, free-form conversation happening about you that you have no control over. Tim Leberecht offers three big ideas about accepting that loss of control, even designing for it — and using it as an impetus to recommit to your values. As chief marketing officer at frog, Tim Leberecht helps spark and nurture new thinking (and great design) for companies around the world. Why you should listen to him: Tim Leberecht is Chief Marketing Officer of global design and innovation firm frog, which has developed and brought to market product and service innovations for Apple, AT&T, BMW, Disney, GE, HP, Intel, SAP, Siemens, Sony, and many other Fortune 500 brands. He is also the publisher of frog’s design mind print and online magazine, the curator of “The Meaning of Business” series, and the producer of the “Reinvent Business” hackathons. Leberecht is an avid blogger and writer on marketing, innovation, and design topics; his work has appeared in Fast Company, Wired, Rotman Magazine, Economic Observer, CEO/CIO Magazine, The European, CNET, Poptech, the Forumblog, and Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. He’s a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Values, 2011-2014, and participated in a series of expert hearings on a future vision for Germany, held by the German Federal Chancellery.

     
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  • Eddie Obeng: Smart failure for a fast-changing world

    The world is changing much more rapidly than most people realize, says business educator Eddie Obeng — and creative output cannot keep up. In this spirited talk, he highlights three important changes we should understand for better productivity, and calls for a stronger culture of “smart failure.” Our environment changes faster than we can learn about it, Eddie Obeng says. How do we keep up? Why you should listen to him: What will business look like in 5 years? (Er, what does it look like now?) Eddie Obeng helps executives keep up with a business and social environment that’s changing faster than we can know. Through Pentacle, his online business school, Obeng teaches a theory of management that focuses on adaptation to change. Called “New World Management,” it’s all about forming and re-forming workgroups, constantly re-evaluating metrics, and being open to all kinds of learning, from hands-on group exercises to a virtual lecture hall/meeting room called the QUBE. “Making it happen” is Obeng’s constant refrain and his books are an antidote to the dryness of much managerial theorizing. They come complete with their lessons in fictional form. Old world they are not.”  Financial Times  

     
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  • I am a champion – the greatest speech ever

     
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  • Diversifying Your Business Wealth – Part 1: Rainy Days Do Happen

     
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  • Why You Should Join Advisors in Philanthropy Now?

    At the International Association of Advisors in Philanthropy, affectionately known as “AiP,” we believe that people can make a difference in the world by caring for each other. This requires that donors, professionals, and charities have a safe community to better get to know each other and build trust. It is only by transforming many Me’s into one strong and united We that a network can truly take advantage of the real power of collaboration. To learn more about AiP’s Member Benefits, please click here. To join AiP today and become part of this incredible global philanthropic community, click here. To read the latest updates from AiP, click here. To learn more about the Chartered Advisor in Philanthropy® (CAP®) designation, click here. To learn more about the AiP Foundation, click here. Onward and upward AiP on your amazing mission to Transform the Philanthropic World through Collaboration. Related articles Advisors in Philanthropy President’s Letter – September 2012 (lugenfamilyoffice.com) What motivates philanthropists? (bbc.co.uk) Emotional component must be present for effective philanthropy (denverpost.com) Business owners and charitable giving (fidelity.com) The Philanthropy 400: Top Charities Struggle to Recover (womensphilanthropy.typepad.com) Philanthropy Management: China Strives to Adopt Another U.S. Practice: Strategic Philanthropy (sys-con.com)  

     
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