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The Myth of Communication: Roger Graef OBE

The Myth of Communication: Roger Graef OBE

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We assume when we try to communicate that the other person(s) will get the message in every sense of the word. But this is wishful thinking. Professor Roger Graef explores how dangerous it is to assume that the recipient has taken both the words and the intention in the form you would wish. It’s not just a matter of language, or erratic technology – spam isn’t just a technical problem. It’s a state of mind.

Professor Roger Graef OBE is an award winning film-maker, criminologist, broadcaster and writer. He is best known for his unstaged observational films in normally closed places like government ministries, corporation board rooms, international institutions including the EU and UN, as well as prisons, probation, special schools, and social work.
Many of his films have influenced business, diplomacy, policing, social and criminal justice policy. Most recently, THE TROUBLE WITH ADOPTION: A Panorama Special helped the government promise of speedier adoptions. Other recent films include THE TROUBLE WITH PIRATES about Somalia, and GREAT ORMOND STREET, following consultants making ground-breaking life and death decisions, and the online project CERNpeople, short films for Google using access to CERN in Geneva. All these were created through his production company Films of Record.
He was a founding board member of Channel 4, was on the board of London Transport and co-designed the bus map., He is currently one of three commissioners on the RIBA Future of Homes Commission.
He writes and broadcasts regularly on social and criminal justice and communications. He is the author of TALKING BLUES, Police in their Own Words, LIVING DANGEROUSLY: young offenders in their own words, and WHY RESTORATIVE JUSTICE?
In 2004 he was the first documentary maker awarded the BAFTA Fellowship for lifetime achievement.
In 2006 he was given an OBE.
He was News International Visiting Professor of Communications at Oxford University, and is now Visiting Professor at the Mannheim Centre for Criminology at the LSE. He has been an Independent Advisor to the Metropolitan Police on race since 1999, and is an advisor to the Sentencing Council. He is currently Chair of the Media Standards Trust, and the theatre company Complicite.

Society minds, technology doesn´t: Yvonne Rogers

Society minds, technology doesn´t: Yvonne Rogers

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Professor of Interaction Design and director of UCLIC at UCL. Her research interests are in the areas of ubiquitous computing, interaction design and human-computer interaction.

In her talk, Yvonne shows us the different effects technology has on us. She mentions various (negative) examples of too much smartphone usage and she shows us how to use technology and information wisely so that in the end we can use it to have more time and to be happier. (and not: being a slave of technology)

Power Of Pause : Sneha Iype Varma

Power Of Pause : Sneha Iype Varma

 

The Future of Growing Up: Fred Penner

The Future of Growing Up: Fred Penner

Published on Jul 17, 2013

A gentle giant with kind eyes and an undeniable ability to make you feel good about yourself, this musical master brings 25 years of commitment, consistency and depth to a career that so skillfully blends the many genres of performing and communication, Billboard Magazine dubbed him “Mr. Multi-Media.”

More than the music, the two-time Juno winner and eight-time nominee’s body of work is about energy and emotional connection. The guy who crawled magically out of that hollow log for 12 seasons and nearly 900 episodes in the hit CBC TV show Fred Penner’s Place receives fan mail to this day from some of the 55 million American viewers where the show ran for four years on Nickelodeon in the U.S.

 

Texting that saves lives – Nancy Lublin

Texting that saves lives – Nancy Lublin

When Nancy Lublin started texting teenagers to help with her social advocacy organization, what she found was shocking — they started texting back about their own problems, from bullying to depression to abuse. So she’s setting up a text-only crisis line, and the results might be even more important than she expected.

 

Any fool can criticize – Dale Carnegie

Narrative Humility: Sayantani DasGupta

Narrative Humility: Sayantani DasGupta

Sayantani is a physican and writer, originally trained in pediatrics and public health, who is a faculty member in the Master’s Program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia University and the Graduate Program in Health Advocacy at Sarah Lawrence College. Sayantani teaches courses on illness and disability memoir, and narrative, health and social justice. She is a widely published and nationally recognized speaker on issues of narrative, health care, race, gender and medical education, and in 2012 was featured in Oprah Magazine in an article on Narrative Medicine – which she describes as the clinical and scholarly movement to find health care’s lost art of story-telling and story listening. She is the co-author of The Demon Slayers and Other Stories: Bengali Folktales, the author of a memoir about her education at Johns Hopkins, Her Own Medicine: A Woman’s Journey from Student to Doctor, and the co-editor of an award winning collection of women’s illness narratives, Stories of Illness and Healing: Women Write their Bodies.

Stories have always been at the heart of health and healing. Before fancy imaging equipment or lab tests in their metaphorical black bags, they had the ability to be present, to witness another human being’s life and death, suffering and joy. Narrative medicine is the clinical and scholarly movement to find health care’s lost art of storytelling and story listening. A narrative understanding of health care honors the ancient, storied heart of healing, while teaching those responding to stories—clinicians, therapists, family members, and advocates—how to go about the art of witnessing. Witnessing stories from a position of Narrative Humility acknowledges that stories of the ill are not objects in which to become ‘competent’ or master, but rather, dynamic entities that for healers to approach and engage with, while simultaneously remaining open to their ambiguity and contradiction, and engaging in constant self-evaluation and self-critique about issues like the witnesses role in the story, expectations of the story, responsibilities to the story, and identifications with the story. Narrative humility is a philosophy of listening which holds potential beyond health care as well, in any situation where more powerful individuals engage with stories of those who are socially, culturally or politically less powerful. It acknowledges that the listener — be that a clinician, reporter, policy maker, or teacher — must willingly place herself in a position of some transparency. The witness must not only see, but be seen, and by doing so, enable herself to see even more clearly.

 

Shall We Talk?: Wujing Wang

Shall We Talk?: Wujing Wang

Wujing is interested in designing digital tools that help people learn more intuitively and efficiently. In her free time, she enjoys exploring the possibilities of life, which means making all kinds of mistakes and learning from them.

Wujing was the quietest kid in her family and the silence later became a “habit”. When she discovered that she was not able to express herself even when she wanted, she decided to challenge herself. Though having learned a lot about openness and its benefits, she still found it too hard to open her mouth or heart. Therefore, she started searching for the key to openness by her own and she did it in the oldest way–by asking people. It was in people’s real stories that she found the secret ingredient to openness. This talk is about her unique journey and her creative way of letting people who face the similar challenges inspire each other.

 

All progress depends on the unreasonable man – George Bernard Shaw

george bernard shaw

 

 

All progress depends on the unreasonable man – George Bernard Shaw

Simplicity is the key to brilliance – Bruce Lee

 

Simplicity is the key to brilliance – Bruce Lee