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A hero is someone who chooses to believe in you when you have ceased to believe in yourself

A hero is someone who chooses to believe in you when you have ceased to believe in yourself

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Daphne Bavelier: Your brain on video games

Daphne Bavelier: Your brain on video games

How do fast-paced video games affect the brain? Step into the lab with cognitive researcher Daphne Bavelier to hear surprising news about how video games, even action-packed shooter games, can help us learn, focus and, fascinatingly, multitask.

Daphne Bavelier studies how the brain adapts to changes in experience, either by nature or by training.

Why you should listen to her:

Daphne Bavelier studies how humans learn — in particular, how the brain adapts to changes in experience, either by nature (for example, deafness) or by training (for example, playing video games). At her lab, her work shows that playing fast-paced, action-packed entertainment video games typically thought to be mind-numbing actually benefits several aspects of behavior.  Exploiting this counterintuitive finding, her lab now investigates how new media, such as video games, can be leveraged to foster learning and brain plasticity.

Gabe Zichermann: How games make kids smarter

Can playing video games make you more productive? Gabe Zichermann shows how games are making kids better problem-solvers, and will make us better at everything from driving to multi-tasking.

Do kids these days have short attention spans, or does the world just move too slow? Gabe Zichermann suggests that today’s video games are making children smarter — and we should all embrace gamification

Why you should listen to him:

Gabe Zichermann is an entrepreneur and author whose work centers on gamification–and the power of games to help engage people and build strong organizations and communities. In 2010, he chaired the Gamification summit, a conference dedicated to gamification and “engagement mechanics.” An avid blogger on the subject, he co-authored the book “Game-Based Marketing”, which examines the innovative trend of using game mechanics to engage and build a customer base.

“If you haven’t applied games to advertising, marketing, or brand management, you’ll want to get and study this book — or it could be game over for you.”  Jonathan Epstein CEO, Double Fusion, former EVP, IGN/Gamespy

 

Jane McGonigal: Gaming can make a better world

Games like World of Warcraft give players the means to save worlds, and incentive to learn the habits of heroes. What if we could harness this gamer power to solve real-world problems? Jane McGonigal says we can, and explains how.

Reality is broken, says Jane McGonigal, and we need to make it work more like a game. Her work shows us how.

Why you should listen to her:

Jane McGonigal asks: Why doesn’t the real world work more like an online game? In the best-designed games, our human experience is optimized: We have important work to do, we’re surrounded by potential collaborators, and we learn quickly and in a low-risk environment. In her work as a game designer and director of game R&D at the Institute for the Future, she creates games that use mobile and digital technologies to turn everyday spaces into playing fields, and everyday people into teammates. Her game-world insights can explain–and improve–the way we learn, work, solve problems, and lead our real lives.

Several years ago she suffered a serious concussion, and she created a multiplayer game to get through it, opening it up to anyone to play. In “Superbetter,” players set a goal (health or wellness) and invite others to play with them–and to keep them on track. While most games, and most videogames, have traditionally been about winning, we are now seeing increasing collaboration and games played together to solve problems.

“I say we work together and … create a new world we all want to participate in. I am not sure what that looks like, but I applaud Jane McGonigal for sharing a peek at it with me.”
Kelly Krolik

 

Jane McGonigal: The game that can give you 10 extra years of life

When game designer Jane McGonigal found herself bedridden and suicidal following a severe concussion, she had a fascinating idea for how to get better. She dove into the scientific research and created the healing game, SuperBetter. In this moving talk, McGonigal explains how a game can boost resilience — and promises to add 7.5 minutes to your life.

Reality is broken, says Jane McGonigal, and we need to make it work more like a game. Her work shows us how.

Why you should listen to her:

Jane McGonigal asks: Why doesn’t the real world work more like an online game? In the best-designed games, our human experience is optimized: We have important work to do, we’re surrounded by potential collaborators, and we learn quickly and in a low-risk environment. In her work as a game designer and director of game R&D at the Institute for the Future, she creates games that use mobile and digital technologies to turn everyday spaces into playing fields, and everyday people into teammates. Her game-world insights can explain–and improve–the way we learn, work, solve problems, and lead our real lives.

Several years ago she suffered a serious concussion, and she created a multiplayer game to get through it, opening it up to anyone to play. In “Superbetter,” players set a goal (health or wellness) and invite others to play with them–and to keep them on track. While most games, and most videogames, have traditionally been about winning, we are now seeing increasing collaboration and games played together to solve problems.

“I say we work together and … create a new world we all want to participate in. I am not sure what that looks like, but I applaud Jane McGonigal for sharing a peek at it with me.”
Kelly Krolik

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