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Intentional Serendipity: Corey Ford

Intentional Serendipity: Corey Ford

Corey Ford on “Intentional Serendipity.”

Corey Ford is the CEO of Matter Ventures, a $2.5 million incubator and start-up accelerator launched by Public Radio Exchange (PRX) and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation to spur innovation in public media. He most recently built Runway, a pre-team, pre-idea incubator for entrepreneurs at Innovation Endeavors, Google chairman Eric Schmidt‘s venture capital fund. Prior to that, he taught design thinking innovation at the Institute of Design at Stanford University. Corey began his career in public broadcasting managing the production of 17 films for the PBS/WGBH series FRONTLINE, earning an Emmy and a duPont-Columbia Gold Baton Award. He earned an MBA at Stanford and was a Morehead Scholar at UNC-Chapel Hill where he majored in Journalism and International Studies.

 

The keys to Andreessen Horowitz’s success

The keys to Andreessen Horowitz‘s success

Venture capitalists Marc Andreessen and Ben Horowitz talk about how they modeled their firm after CAA and JPMorgan.

 

Private Equity Revealed – How to sell a business?

Private Equity Revealed – How to sell a business?

Miriam Varadi, author of the book Merchants of Enterprise, with her guest Larry Klar, Partner at The Succession Fund, discuss the steps a business owner should take when trying to sell their business including the process, timing, an independent business valuation and a SWOT analysis.

 

Vinod Khosla on “The Innovation Ecosystem” – Haas School

Vinod Khosla on “The Innovation Ecosystem” – Haas School

Vinod Khosla, Founder and Partner of the venture capital firm Khosla Ventures on “The Innovation Ecosystem and Its Role in Shaping Our Renewable Future. This presentation at the Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley, is part of the Dean’s Speaker Series on the occasion of Khosla receiving the 2009 Lifetime Achievement Award in Entrepreneurship and Innovation from the Lester Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation. (Sept. 9, 2009)

The University of California Berkeley Haas School of Business is one of the world’s leading producers of new ideas and knowledge in all areas of business – which includes the distinction of having two of its faculty members receive the Nobel Prize in Economics over the past 15 years. The school offers six degree-granting programs. Its mission is to develop innovative business leaders – individuals who redefine how we do business by putting new ideas into action, and who do so responsibly. The school’s distinctive culture is defined by four key principles – question the status quo; confidence without attitude; students always; and, beyond yourself.

 

Business Plans: Jim Goetz, Sequoia Capital

Business Plans: Jim Goetz, Sequoia Capital

You have an idea and you want to get going. But you hear that a business plan is a critical part of the next step. What are the components of a business plan that you need to develop? Presenter: Jim Goetz, Partner, Sequoia Capital. Recorded: February 27, 2008

 

Grant Thornton 2012 Global Private Equity Report

Grant Thornton 2012 Global Private Equity Report

The report provides insight into private equity general partners‘ expectations for numerous aspects of the fundraising and investment cycle.

Harish HV — Partner, Corporate Finance, Grant Thornton in India said, “Private equity in emerging markets is challenging because of the governance risks and the absence of deep capital and M&A markets to enable exits. An understanding of the local situation is key to success in these markets.”

 

Company Culture

Company Culture

When starting a new venture give careful thought to how you interact with those around, particularly those on your team: You may be setting a culture without knowing it.

 

Top 10 Mistakes Made by Entrepreneurs

Top 10 Mistakes Made by Entrepreneurs

What things typically trip up an entrepreneur in starting and running a company? Is it getting the right business partner? Is it having the killer technology? How does one recover from major setbacks? A panel of seasoned entrepreneurs, angels, venture capitalists, and board members discuss the common pitfalls most new entrepreneurs encounter when building their businesses.

 

Family Governance Explained

Family Governance Explained

How is family governance relevant to investment professionals and Family Offices? What is a family constitution and how can it help avoid family conflicts? What lessons can we learn from the recent family conflicts that have been in the media in Asia? How should a family start if they want to form a family constitution?”

 

Jacqueline Novogratz: Inspiring a life of immersion

Jacqueline Novogratz: Inspiring a life of immersion

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We each want to live a life of purpose, but where to start? In this luminous, wide-ranging talk, Jacqueline Novogratz introduces us to people she’s met in her work in “patient capital” — people who have immersed themselves in a cause, a community, a passion for justice. These human stories carry powerful moments of inspiration.

Jacqueline Novogratz founded and leads Acumen Fund, a nonprofit that takes a businesslike approach to improving the lives of the poor. In her new book, The Blue Sweater, she tells stories from the new philanthropy, which emphasizes sustainable bottom-up solutions over traditional top-down aid.

Why you should listen to her:

One of the most innovative players shaping philanthropy today, Jacqueline Novogratz is redefining the way problems of poverty can be solved around the world. Drawing on her past experience in banking, microfinance and traditional philanthropy, Novogratz has become a leading proponent for financing entrepreneurs and enterprises that can bring affordable clean water, housing and healthcare to poor people so that they no longer have to depend on the disappointing results and lack of accountability seen in traditional charity and old-fashioned aid.

The Acumen Fund, which she founded in 2001, has an ambitious plan: to create a blueprint for alleviating poverty using market-oriented approaches. Indeed, Acumen has more in common with a venture capital fund than a typical nonprofit. Rather than handing out grants, Acumen invests in fledgling companies and organizations that bring critical — often life-altering — products and services to the world’s poor. Like VCs, Acumen offers not just money, but also infrastructure and management expertise. From drip-irrigation systems in India to malaria-preventing bed nets in Tanzania to a low-cost mortgage program in Pakistan, Acumen’s portfolio offers important case studies for entrepreneurial efforts aimed at the vastly underserved market of those making less than $4/day.

It’s a fascinating model that’s shaken up philanthropy and investment communities alike. Acumen Fund manages more than $20 million in investments aimed at serving the poor. And most of their projects deliver stunning, inspiring results. Their success can be traced back to Novogratz herself, who possesses that rarest combination of business savvy and cultural sensitivity. In addition to seeking out sound business models, she places great importance on identifying solutions from within communities rather than imposing them from the outside. “People don’t want handouts,” Novogratz said at TEDGlobal 2005. “They want to make their own decisions, to solve their own problems.”

In her new book, The Blue Sweater, she tells stories from the new philanthropy, which emphasizes sustainable bottom-up solutions over traditional top-down aid.

“Acumen Fund is a not-for-profit group (but not a charity) that is supported by investors (not donors) who want a good “social return” on their capital.”
Fortune