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Steve Blank: “Entrepreneurship is a Calling”

Steve Blank: “Entrepreneurship is a Calling”

Steve Blank, serial entrepreneur and Stanford consulting associate professor, explains what it takes to become a successful entrepreneur. He appeared at the E-Provocateur speaker series hosted by the Center for Entrepreneurial Studies (CES) at the Stanford Graduate School of Business on October 23, 2012.

 

Generation Ageless: Longevity and the Boomers

The 2010 Roundtable at Stanford featured a prestigious panel discussing aging and the issues that accompany it. The conversation was moderated by Tom Brokaw and featured John Hennessy, Laura Carstensen, Sandra Day O’Connor, Robert Sapolsky, Sheryl Sandberg and Barry Rand. The panel discusses a variety of issues from social security to age related diseases and public awareness.

The 2010 Roundtable took place during Stanford University’s Reunion Homecoming Weekend. It was the fifth annual Roundtable at Stanford and took place in Maples Pavillion.

 

Tina Seelig: “InGenius”

Internationally bestselling author and award-winning Stanford University educator Tina Seelig has taught creativity to the best and brightest students at Stanford and to business leaders around the world. With inGenius she expertly decodes creativity, revealing an approach that everyone can use to enhance their own creative genius.

In today’s world, innovation and creative problem solving are more important than ever to succeed. For many of us, however, this process is a mystery. Whether we are attempting to generate fresh ideas or struggling with problems with no solutions in sight, the innovative spark is out of reach. inGenius offers a revolutionary new model, the Innovation Engine, which explains how creativity is generated on the inside and how it is influenced by the outside world. Describing the variables that work together to catalyze or inhibit our creative abilities, Seelig provides a set of tools we can each use right away to radically enhance our own ingenuity as well as that of our colleagues, teams, organizations, and communities.

Seelig’s groundbreaking work reveals that creativity is an endless renewable resource we can tap into at any time. It is as natural as breathing, and just as necessary for leading a successful and fulfilling life.

About the author: Tina Seelig has a Ph.D. in neuroscience from Stanford University Medical School. She is the executive director of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program, the director of the National Center for Engineering Pathways to Innovation, and is the author of the international bestseller What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20

 

Daphne Koller: What we’re learning from online education

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Daphne Koller is enticing top universities to put their most intriguing courses online for free — not just as a service, but as a way to research how people learn. With Coursera (cofounded by Andrew Ng), each keystroke, quiz, peer-to-peer discussion and self-graded assignment builds an unprecedented pool of data on how knowledge is processed.

With Coursera, Daphne Koller and co-founder Andrew Ng are bringing courses from top colleges online, free, for anyone who wants to take them.

Why you should listen to her:

A 3rd generation Ph.D who is passionate about education, Stanford professor Daphne Koller is excited to be making the college experience available to anyone through her startup, Coursera. With classes from 16 top colleges, Coursera is an innovative model for online learning. While top schools have been putting lectures online for years, Coursera’s platform supports the other vital aspect of the classroom: tests and assignments that reinforce learning.

At the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, computer scientist Daphne Koller studies how to model large, complicated decisions with lots of uncertainty. (Her research group is called DAGS, which stands for Daphne’s Approximate Group of Students.) In 2004, she won a MacArthur Fellowship for her work, which involves, among other things, using Bayesian networks and other techniques to explore biomedical and genetic data sets.

“Classes involve recorded lectures and quizzes in which the video pauses to let students answer questions.”  Ari Levy in Bloomberg BusinessWeek