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Business Ideas – 3 Lessons from George Foreman

Business Ideas – 3 Lessons from George Foreman by Evan Carmichael

 

george foreman

 

Today we’re going to look at how a high school dropout who was constantly in trouble with the law turned his life around and started to believe him himself. He would go on to become two-time former World Heavyweight Boxing Champion and multimillionaire entrepreneur. This is the story of boxing great George Foreman and the top 3 lessons that you can learn from his success.

 

“Learn to sell and you’ll never starve.”- George Foreman

 

George “Big George” Foreman (born January 10, 1949) is an Olympic gold medalist, two-time former World Heavyweight Boxing Champion, and entrepreneur. A high school dropout, as a teenager, Foreman didn’t know how to read or write. He took to the streets and got into trouble by picking pockets and mugging people. His sister told him “You’ll never be anything.”

 

After finding himself on the run from the police one night and digging himself in a pile of mud to avoid their dogs finding him, Foreman decided he had to change his life. He enrolled in a job skills training program for youth and began learning how to read and write. He later also learned how to box and entered into amateur competitions so he could send $50 home to his mother every month. After a year and a half of learning to box he entered into the Olympic Games and won the gold medal. He went on to win the World Heavyweight Boxing Championship twice.

 

After twice retiring from professional boxing, Foreman became an entrepreneur and toured the world selling George Foreman Grills. In 2002 alone, the company earned $922 million from selling the grills. Foreman would go on to earn 3 times more money from the grills than throughout his entire career as a boxer. He has also moved on to selling TV shows, clothing, books, and Indy Car racing teams.

 

Action Item #1: Learn How to Sell
Action Item #2: Get People to Like You
Action Item #3: Keep Trying Until it Works

 

 

It’s rare that entrepreneurs make it big off their first idea. And even if they do, the idea has changed many times from what they thought they were going to create. Failing is a part of business. The key is to get started. Too many people don’t start because they’re afraid of failing. You will know failure – keep going. Fail smarter the next time and eventually success will be yours.

 

Foreman isn’t afraid of failing in business. He’s done everything from specialty shoes made for diabetics to a health-food restaurant chain to a reality television series. He’s willing to try almost anything if he thinks it might be a good opportunity and it’s something he believes in. As long as the business is something he can feel proud of and won’t damage his integrity, Foreman is willing to stretch his brand to almost anything. You never know until you try!

 

According to Foreman: “You’ve got to start out early in the morning and look at hundreds, literally hundreds of things. And it may take a year, it may take three or four years, but you’re going to hit something so you have something to put on the table for your family… You know you put out a lot of buckshot, you’re going to strike one.”

 

True Story

 

With a criminal record and a reputation for being a troublemaker, few gave Foreman a chance. When he joined the U.S. Job Corps looking for a way to get off the streets, he caused so many problems that he was almost expelled from the program. His supervisor advised him to find a different outlet for his anger and suggested he take up boxing. When Foreman first started to box, he was so scared that he just closed his eyes and swung his massive fists to win the fights. It was only until he started going up against better boxers that he had to learn to fight with his eyes open.

 

Quotes

 

“The greatest asset, even in this country, is not oil and gas. It’s integrity. Everyone is searching for it, asking, ‘Who can I do business with that I can trust?’”

 

“You must preserve the quality of your name, your integrity. You don’t want to lie about anything. And it’s something that people will be happy about once they get to know you. Because people count on you.”

 

“Make a decision you’ll be able to sleep with, wake up the next day, look in the mirror and feel good about yourself.”

 

Sue Austin: Deep sea diving … in a wheelchair

Sue Austin: Deep sea diving … in a wheelchair

 

When Sue Austin got a power chair 16 years ago, she felt a tremendous sense of freedom — yet others looked at her as though she had lost something. In her art, she aims to convey the spirit of wonder she feels wheeling through the world. Includes thrilling footage of an underwater wheelchair that lets her explore ocean beds, drifting through schools of fish, floating free in 360 degrees. (Filmed at TEDxWomen.)

 

In repurposing her wheelchair to create fantastical art, Sue Austin reshapes how we think about disability.

 

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO HER?

 

Multimedia, performance and installation artist Sue Austin keeps a fascinating mission at the center her work: to challenge the idea of disabled as “other” and represent her experience as a wheelchair user in a brighter light. She does this by creating quirky, unexpected juxtapositions — bringing a sense of whimsy and empowerment to the discussion of disability.

 

Austin is the founder and artistic director of Freewheeling, an initiative aiming to further the genre of Disability Arts. In 2012, she was asked to be a part of the Cultural Olympiad in Britain, a celebration of the arts leading up to the Olympic and Paralympic Games. The work she created for the event, called “Creating the Spectacle!,” is a groundbreaking series of live art and video works of an underwater wheelchair.

 

“Like the athletes at the Paralympics, disabled artist Sue Austin is working to redefine the popular notion of disability. This week, she has been amazing spectators with a specially equipped wheelchair that lets her fly underwater.” PRI’s The World

 

Janine Shepherd: A broken body isn’t a broken person

Janine Shepherd: A broken body isn’t a broken person

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Cross-country skier Janine Shepherd hoped for an Olympic medal — until she was hit by a truck during a training bike ride. She shares a powerful story about the human potential for recovery. Her message: you are not your body, and giving up old dreams can allow new ones to soar.

Athlete Janine Shepherd was rendered a partial paraplegic when she was hit by a truck during an Olympic training bike ride. Doctors didn’t expect her to recover. But she not only learned to walk again — she learned to fly.

Why you should listen to her:

Janine Shepherd is a walking paraplegic; she is also a pilot and aerobatics instructor, as well as a motivational speaker and author.

A champion cross-country skier in training for the winter Olympics, Janine’s life changed forever when she was hit by a truck during a bicycle ride in the Blue Mountains of Australia. Doctors did not expect her to survive and, when she did, they warned her that she would never walk again.

Janine focused intently for years on healing both her broken body and crushed morale. A turning point came watching small planes flying overhead. She decided: “If I can’t walk, I’ll fly.” While still in a full body cast, Janine was lifted into an aircraft for her first flight. Within a year she had her private pilot’s license. Later, she earned her commercial pilots license and instructor’s rating. Janine recently served on the board of Australia’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) and became its youngest — and only — female director.

Janine is a the patron of the Australasian Spinal Research Trust and is committed to helping find a cure for spinal cord injury in the near future. In the meantime, she seeks to inspire those coping with physical disability. She is the author of five books, including The Gift of Acceptance and Never Tell Me Never. And while doctors told her after her accident that she would never have children, she now is a mother of three.

“Janine is a brilliant story teller who uses her wit, charm, humor, and impeccable timing to engage the audience. She shares her journey in an expansive, inspiring, and universal way that touches every heart in the room and invites each of us to dream…to reach…to grow beyond our preconceived limits.”  Davidji, Dean of the Chopra Center University