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Stephen Pratt, Infosys Consulting – Leadership and Networking from the CEO Perspective – Haas

Stephen Pratt, Infosys Consulting – Leadership and Networking from the CEO Perspective – Haas

Stephen Pratt, CEO and managing director, Infosys Consulting, speaks on Leadership and Networking from the CEO Perspective at the Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley. This lecture is part of the annual Career Management Conference for first-year full-time MBA students and the Deans Speaker Series. (October 20, 2009)

The University of California Berkeley Haas School of Business is one of the world’s leading producers of new ideas and knowledge in all areas of business – which includes the distinction of having two of its faculty members receive the Nobel Prize in Economics over the past 15 years. The school offers six degree-granting programs. Its mission is to develop innovative business leaders – individuals who redefine how we do business by putting new ideas into action, and who do so responsibly. The school’s distinctive culture is defined by four key principles – question the status quo; confidence without attitude; students always; and, beyond yourself.

 

John Hagel, Deloitte Center for the Edge – Haas School’s Dean’s Speaker Series

John Hagel, Deloitte Center for the Edge – Haas School’s Dean’s Speaker Series

John Hagel, co-chairman, Silicon Valley-based Deloitte Center for the Edge, on “The Power of Pull: How Small Moves, Smartly Made, Can Set Big Things in Motion.” Part of the Dean’s Speaker Series at the Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley. Introduction by Dean Rich Lyons. (April 13, 2010)

The University of California Berkeley Haas School of Business is one of the world’s leading producers of new ideas and knowledge in all areas of business – which includes the distinction of having two of its faculty members receive the Nobel Prize in Economics over the past 15 years. The school offers six degree-granting programs. Its mission is to develop innovative business leaders – individuals who redefine how we do business by putting new ideas into action, and who do so responsibly. The school’s distinctive culture is defined by four key principles – question the status quo; confidence without attitude; students always; and, beyond yourself.

 

MBA Commencement 2009: John Woolard – Haas School

MBA Commencement 2009: John Woolard – Haas School

John Woolard, CEO, BrightSource Energy and Haas alumnus (MBA 97), gives the 2009 MBA Commencement speech at the Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley. (May 17, 2009)

 

Ginger Hardage, Haas School of Business Dean’s Speakers Series

Ginger Hardage, Haas School of Business Dean’s Speakers Series

Ginger Hardage, Senior Vice President Culture & Communications, Southwest Airlines speaks to the Haas School of Business about culture.

 

Glen Fukushima, Airbus Japan — Haas School

Glen Fukushima, Airbus Japan — Haas School

Glen S. Fukushima, president and CEO of Airbus Japan, gives a talk at the Haas School, UC Berkeley, entitled “The US Presidential Election and Japan.” Fukushima, a longtime observer of and participant in relations between the United States and Japan, will talk about the preference among Japanese leaders for Republican presidential administrations and the implications of that relationship on US-Japanese relations. (March 21, 2008)

The University of California Berkeley Haas School of Business is one of the world’s leading producers of new ideas and knowledge in all areas of business – which includes the distinction of having two of its faculty members receive the Nobel Prize in Economics over the past 15 years. The school offers six degree-granting programs. Its mission is to develop innovative business leaders – individuals who redefine how we do business by putting new ideas into action, and who do so responsibly. The school’s distinctive culture is defined by four key principles – question the status quo; confidence without attitude; students always; and, beyond yourself.

 

N.W. (Bill) Jasper, Jr., Dolby Labs – Haas School

N.W. (Bill) Jasper, Jr., Dolby Labs – Haas School

The Dean’s Speaker Series: “Innovation at Dolby Laboratories.” N.W. (Bill) Jasper, Jr., CEO, President, and Director of Dolby Laboratories, speaking on innovation at the Haas School, UC Berkeley. Over the past 25 years, Jasper has led Dolby’s successful transition from analog audio pioneer to digital entertainment company. (August 21, 2007)

The University of California Berkeley Haas School of Business is one of the world’s leading producers of new ideas and knowledge in all areas of business – which includes the distinction of having two of its faculty members receive the Nobel Prize in Economics over the past 15 years. The school offers six degree-granting programs. Its mission is to develop innovative business leaders – individuals who redefine how we do business by putting new ideas into action, and who do so responsibly. The school’s distinctive culture is defined by four key principles – question the status quo; confidence without attitude; students always; and, beyond yourself.

 

Nobel Prize-winning Economists: What Retirement Means to Me

Nobel Prize-winning economists Robert C. Merton, Robert Solow, and Paul Samuelson are interviewed by PBS NewsHour correspondent Paul Solman about the 2008 financial crisis at the Future of Life-Cycle Saving and Investing conference.

 

Daniel Kahneman: The riddle of experience vs. memory

Using examples from vacations to colonoscopies, Nobel laureate and founder of behavioral economics Daniel Kahneman reveals how our “experiencing selves” and our “remembering selves” perceive happiness differently. This new insight has profound implications for economics, public policy — and our own self-awareness.

Widely regarded as the world’s most influential living psychologist, Daniel Kahneman won the Nobel in Economics for his pioneering work in behavioral economics — exploring the irrational ways we make decisions about risk.

Why you should listen to him:

Daniel Kahneman is an eminence grise for the Freakonomics crowd. In the mid-1970s, with his collaborator Amos Tversky, he was among the first academics to pick apart exactly why we make “wrong” decisions. In their 1979 paper on prospect theory, Kahneman and Tversky examined a simple problem of economic risk. And rather than stating the optimal, rational answer, as an economist of the time might have, they quantified how most real people, consistently, make a less-rational choice. Their work treated economics not as a perfect or self-correcting machine, but as a system prey to quirks of human perception. The field of behavioral economics was born.

Kahneman was awarded the Nobel Memorial prize in 2002 for his work with Tversky, who died before the award was bestowed. In a lovely passage in his Nobel biography, Kahneman looks back on his deep collaboration with Tversky and calls for a new form of academic cooperation, marked not by turf battles but by “adversarial collaboration,” a good-faith effort by unlike minds to conduct joint research, critiquing each other in the service of an ideal of truth to which both can contribute.

“Amos and I shared the wonder of together owning a goose that could lay golden eggs — a joint mind that was better than our separate minds.”   Daniel Kahneman