Home » Posts tagged 'London' (Page 2)

Tag Archives: London

The Wealth Report: Commercial Property discussion with Jeremy Waters & James Roberts

The Wealth Report: Commercial Property discussion with Jeremy Waters & James Roberts

CommercIal property is back. As private investors look to increase their exposure to the global economic recovery, the Wealth Report 2013 looks at where the smart money is heading. Jeremy Waters, partner at Knight Frank and James Roberts, head of Commercial Research discuss the findings.

 

The Wealth Report – Future Trends in HNWI property investments

The Wealth Report – Future Trends in HNWI property investments

Oliver Knight of Knight Frank‘s Residential Research team looks at the key findings of The Wealth Report’s Attitudes Survey. The survey provides a unique insight into how HNWIs view property now and in the future.

 

The Wealth Report 2013: Examining High Net Worth Individuals from around the world

The Wealth Report 2013: Examining High Net Worth Individuals from around the world

Creating wealth, it seems, is hardwired into us as a species. The total number of HNWIs around the world is increasing once more, despite the global economy still suffering from the aftershocks of the credit crunch and the ensuing financial crisis. much of this wealth creation is taking place in the world’s new economic powerhouses, but london and new york are still considered the most important cities for the super-rich — at least for now…

 

Afra Raymond: Three myths about corruption

Afra Raymond: Three myths about corruption

Trinidad and Tobago amassed great wealth in the 1970s thanks to oil. But in 1982, a shocking fact was revealed — that 2 out of every 3 dollars earmarked for development had been wasted or stolen. This has haunted Afra Raymond for 30 years. Shining a flashlight on a continued history of government corruption, Raymond gives us a reframing of financial crime.

A leading expert in the fields of property valuation and project management, Afra Raymond is battling the government corruption rampant in his country, Trinidad and Tobago.

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO HIM?

Afra Raymond calls out government corruption, demanding more transparency and accountability from the leaders of Trinidad and Tobago. His work in recent years has focused on the CL Financial collapse of 2009 and subsequent government bailout, which Raymond says operated “with different laws of physics” than bailouts of financial institutions in other countries. Writing on topics like white-collar crime, good governance and national development, Raymond shows that corruption shouldn’t be a given. He wrote the column “Property Matters” in The Business Guardian from 2004 through 2012. Now, he writes on his own website, AfraRaymond.com.

Raymond looks at corruption through his lens as an expert in the fields of property valuation, project appraisal, development planning and management. He is a Chartered Surveyor and Managing Director of Raymond & Pierre Limited and  was elected a Fellow of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) in January 2011. He has served on a number of Boards in various positions including Executive Member of the Federation of Black Housing Organizations (FBHO) in London, Board member of the Trinidad Building & Loan Association (TBLA), Director of EPL Properties Limited (EPL), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Eastern Credit Union (ECU) and Immediate Past-President of the Institute of Surveyors of Trinidad & Tobago (ISTT).

“Afra Raymond is a Trinidad and Tobago journalist whose effective work on the CL Financial scandal has continually exposed the unethical and illegal actions of many of the main players in the financial debacle. ”  Barbados Free Press

 

My laugh must never be the reason for somebody’s pain – Charlie Chaplin

My laugh must never be the reason for somebody’s pain – Charlie Chaplin

312437_367050106727717_119342993_n

 

Bloomberg Interview – Pierre Mouton : Economy recover

Bloomberg Interview – Pierre Mouton : Economy recover

 

We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give – Winston Churchill

We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give – Winston Churchill

530631_414699405276237_346117075_n

 

Armstrong admits to doping during Winfrey interview

Armstrong admits to doping during Winfrey interview

His fall nearly complete, disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong finally confessed to using performance-enhancing drugs in an interview on Monday with Oprah Winfrey, USA Today reported.

Although American media had widely speculated that Armstrong would admit to cheating in the interview, neither Winfrey nor Armstrong would confirm the report, in which the newspaper cited an anonymous source.

“We are not confirming any specific details regarding the interview at this time,” a spokesman for Oprah’s network OWN told Reuters.

The report did not say which drugs Armstrong admitted to using, and the American’s attorney and his spokesman did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Armstrong, 41, has always vehemently denied using performance-enhancing drugs and had never tested positive to a doping test. But the evidence against him has been overwhelming.

Oprah, on Twitter, offered little more herself other than to say Armstrong came prepared for the interview, which will be broadcast on Thursday.

“Just wrapped with @lancearmstrong More than 2 1/2 hours. He came READY,” Winfrey tweeted.

But the television host hinted she would provide some more snippets, confirming she would appear on CBS television on Tuesday morning to talk about the interview.

CBS reported Armstrong had indicated he may be willing to testify against others involved in illegal doping and was in talks about repaying part of the taxpayer money he earned during his career.

The unconfirmed reports about his admissions followed Armstrong’s apology to the staff of the cancer foundation he had started over difficulties they may have experienced because of the doping controversy.

“He had a private conversation with the staff, who have done the important work of the foundation for many years,” said Livestrong Foundation spokeswoman Katherine McLane.

“It was a very sincere and heartfelt expression of regret over any stress that they’ve suffered over the course of the last few years as a result of the media attention,” she said.

Shortly after, Armstrong joined his legal team to meet with Winfrey for an interview described as “no-holds-barred.”

The interview was supposed to take place at Armstrong’s Texas home but was switched to a hotel in downtown Austin after news crews camped outside his house before dawn.

SWIFT FALL FROM GRACE

A former cancer survivor who went on to become the greatest cyclist the world has seen, Armstrong’s fall from grace has been as swift and spectacular as his rise through the French alps.

Long dogged by accusations he cheated his way to the top, an October report from the U.S. anti-doping body USADA ultimately triggered his rapid slide.

USADA exposed Armstrong as a liar and a cheat, describing him as the ringmaster of the “most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program that sport has ever seen,” involving anabolic steroids, human growth hormone, blood transfusions and other doping.

Former Armstrong teammates at his U.S. Postal and Discovery Channel outfits, where he won his seven successive Tour titles from 1999 to 2005, testified against him as well as admitting to their own wrongdoing.

The mountain of evidence was overwhelming, and when Armstrong decided not to fight the charges against him, his Tour de France victories were quickly nullified. He was banned from cycling for life.

His sponsors, which had remained loyal to him, began deserting him and he stood down as chairman of Livestrong. Legal issues began to mount.

His former teammate Floyd Landis, a self-confessed cheat, filed a lawsuit against him for defrauding the U.S. government, while the London-based Sunday Times is suing Armstrong to recover about $500,000 it paid him to settle a libel lawsuit.

Armstrong could also be forced to pay back amounts including $7.5 million to SCA Promotions, a Dallas-based company that paid him a bonus for his Tour de France wins.

Throughout it all, Armstrong remained silent, unrepentant and seemingly unconcerned as the cycling world was left reeling by the revelations.

That was until last week, when he announced he had agreed to an interview with Winfrey, prompting speculation he was ready to confess he cheated.

Our greatest test comes when we are weary and think we should give up

Our greatest test comes when we are weary and think we should give up

262605_319075824863195_625736161_n

PwC: Luxury hotels overview

PwC: Luxury hotels overview

Liz Hall, head of hospitality and leisure research at PwC, recently commented on the London luxury hotel market. This year saw the UK’s largest room supply increase from new developments in the last decade. In London, the 2012 Games catalysed development on a scale unlikely to be seen again.