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LOYAL3 CEO Barry Schneider – We Get To Invent Every Single Day

LOYAL3 CEO Barry Schneider: We Get To Invent Every Single Day

 

How do you democratize the stock market? Chairman and CEO Barry Schneider shares LOYAL3′s vision and driving principles for the five-year old startup. LOYAL3 allows companies going public to sell IPO stock to individual investors at the same price as Wall Street. Schneider explains why his company is taking risks and going beyond the status quo to disrupt the capital markets: “There has been precisely 3 IPOs that have ever been crowdsourced. We’ve done them all.” They helped AMC Theatres and Santander Consumer USA go public.Schneider also shares three important values that make up his company’s culture: integrity, innovation, and interdependence. Schneider guest lectured in JD Schramm’s Strategic Communication course on Monday May 19, 2014 where this talk was originally delivered. 

Warren Buffett & Bill Gates on Measuring Performance – Lugen Family Office

Warren Buffett & Bill Gates on Measuring Performance, Wealth, Billionaires, Financial Crisis

 

warren buffett bill gates

Performance measurement is the process of collecting, analyzing and/or reporting information regarding the performance of an individual, group, organization, system or component. It can involve studying processes/strategies within organizations, or studying engineering processes/parameters/phenomena, to see whether output are in line with what was intended or should have been achieved.

 

Performance measurement has been defined by Neely[1] as “the process of quantifying the efficiency and effectiveness of past actions”, while Moullin[2] defines it as “the process of evaluating how well organisations are managed and the value they deliver for customers and other stakeholders”. Discussion on the relative merits of these definitions appeared in several articles in the newsletter of the Performance Management Association.[3]

 

Wikipedia – Performance Measurement

 

The wealth effect is an economic term, referring to an increase (decrease) in spending that accompanies an increase (decrease) in perceived wealth.

 

The effect would cause changes in the amounts and distribution of consumer consumption caused by changes in consumer wealth. People should spend more when one of two things is true: when people actually are richer, objectively, or when people perceive themselves to be richer—for example, the assessed value of their home increases, or a stock they own goes up in price.

 

Demand for some goods (especially Inferior goods) typically decreases with increasing wealth. For example, consider consumption of cheap fast food versus steak. As someone becomes wealthier, their demand for cheap fast food is likely to decrease, and their demand for more expensive steak may increase.

 

Consumption may be tied to relative wealth. Particularly when supply is highly inelastic – or in the case of monopoly – one’s ability to purchase a good may be highly related to one’s relative wealth in the economy. Consider for example the cost of real estate in a city with high average wealth (for example New York or London), in comparison to a city with a low average wealth. Supply is fairly inelastic, so if a helicopter drop (or gold rush) were to suddenly create large amounts of wealth in the low wealth city, those who did not receive this new wealth would rapidly find themselves crowded out of such markets, and materially worse off in terms of their ability to consume/purchase real estate (despite having participated in a weak Pareto improvement). In such situations, one cannot dismiss the relative effect of wealth on demand and supply, and cannot assume that these are static. (see also General equilibrium).

 

However, according to David Backus, an NYU economist, the wealth effect is not observable in economic data, at least in regards to increases or decreases in home or stock equity.[2] For example, while the stock market boom in the late 1990s (q.v. dot-com bubble) increased the wealth of Americans, it did not produce a significant change in consumption, and after the crash, consumption did not decrease.[2]

 

Economist Dean Baker disagrees and says that “housing wealth effect” is well-known and is a standard part of economic theory and modeling, and that economists expect households to consume based on their wealth. He cites approvingly research done by Carroll and Zhou that estimates that households increase their annual consumption by 6 cents for every additional dollar of home equity.[3]

 

The wealth effect and the Paradox of Thrift are contradictory. The paradox assumes, incorrectly, that people will spend when they feel wealthy, based on the wealth effect, but not when they are actually more wealthy.

 

Wikipedia – The Wealth Effect

 

Why Icahn’s Betting More Than $1 Billion on Apple

Why Icahn’s Betting More Than $1 Billion on Apple

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Aug. 14, 2013 (Bloomberg) — Bloomberg “Street Smart” anchor Trish Regan recaps her interview with billionaire activist investor Carl Icahn about his stake in Apple and calling for the company to use $150 billion for share buybacks.

Billionaires Dumping Stock + Running From Wall St.

Billionaires Dumping Stock + Running From Wall St.

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Billionaires are jumping ship from Wall St., with Warren Buffet and George Soros among the notable 1% dumping their stocks in an effort to avoid a feared market crash. We look at analysis of the moves by the power hitters and how too big to fail banks look set to take another hit in this Buzzsaw news clip with Tyrel Ventura and Tabetha Wallace.

 

How you make money affects your taxes

Investing in yourself – Warren Buffett

Investing in yourself – Warren Buffett

Investing in yourself - Warren Buffett

7 Warren Buffett Quotes on Investing

7 Warren Buffett Quotes on Investing 

7 Warren Buffett Quotes on Investing

Where did equity go in Q3 2012?

Where did equity go in Q3 2012?

Global_Chart_Q2_12

Investment Behavior Trends

Investment Behavior Trends

Daniel Dorn discusses his research on individual investor behavior and his ‘preferred risk habitat hypothesis.’

 

Billionaires profit during jobless recovery

Billionaires profit during jobless recovery

The stock market is enjoying record highs, and the mainstream media is touting a recovery in the nation’s housing sector. There are more billionaires than ever around the world, but this economic boon is not being felt in all parts of the U.S. economy. While the wealthiest have seen their paychecks soar, the pain on Main Street continues as Americans struggle to find work and keep their homes.