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Business Ideas – How to Be Enthusiastic Like Mary Kay Ash

Business Ideas – How to Be Enthusiastic Like Mary Kay Ash by Evan carmichael

 

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Evan Carmichael discusses how you break through with your business like one of the most successful women entrepreneurs of all time, Mary Kay Ash.

 

“Most successful people are ordinary people with extraordinary determination.” — Mary Kay Ash

 

Mary Kay Ash (May 12, 1918 — November 22, 2001) was an American businesswoman and founder of Mary Kay Cosmetics, Inc. Raised in a time when few women were in business, let alone successful in business, Ash broke down barriers on her rise up to creating a multi-billion dollar operation.

 

Ash used her $5,000 life savings to open a cosmetics company, Beauty by Mary Kay. Ash had bought the formula for a skin-care cream she was using as well as a storefront in Dallas, and began hiring friends as independent beauty consultants, her term for salespeople.

 

In its first year, company sales reached $198,000, primarily from sales sessions, or ‘skin care classes’, her sales team would hold in private homes. At the time of Ash’s death, Mary Kay Cosmetics had over 800,000 representatives in 37 countries, with total annual sales over $2 billion at retail.

 

Action Item #1: Break Down Barriers in Your Way

 

Starting a business is tough. It can be hard to get customers to believe in a new company and people will doubt your ability to succeed. At times you might even wonder if you made the right decision or if you’re better off going back and getting a job.

 

Mary Kay Ash was tired of being held back and being told that she was “just thinking like a woman.” Starting her own business was her chance to reach her full potential. According to Ash, “You cannot keep determined people from success. If you place stumbling blocks in their way, they will use them for stepping-stones and climb to new heights.”

 

No matter what challenges you come up against, remind yourself of why you started your business and what your vision is. Break big barriers down into small chunks and tackle them one by one until the problem is solved. Whatever you do, don’t give up!

 

Action Item #2: Live by the Golden Rule

 

Whether you are dealing with customers, suppliers, the media, employees, partners, or someone else who can have a meaningful impact on your business, remember that you’re dealing with a person and people like to be recognized and appreciated.

 

Mary Kay Ash’s advice is simple: “I have learned to imagine an invisible sign around each person’s neck that says ‘Make me feel important.’ I never cease to be amazed at how positively people react when they’re made to feel important. Everyone wants to be appreciated. So, if you appreciate someone, don’t keep it a secret.”

 

As a business owner there never seems to be enough time in the day to get everything done which can often cause us to get stressed out and treat people poorly. Try to remember Mary Kay Ash’s rule and make the people around you feel important and appreciated. You’ll see far better business results and you’ll have a lot more fun as well!

 

Action Item #3: Be Enthusiastic

 

Your business idea doesn’t have to be the most creative or original. What can make the difference between success and failure is your enthusiasm for what you’re selling. When you’re enthusiastic you’ll be more convincing and you’ll have an easier time convincing people to take action.

 

According to Mary Kay, “Nothing great was ever accomplished without enthusiasm. If you act enthusiastic, you become enthusiastic. A mediocre idea that generates enthusiasm will go further than a great idea that inspires no one.”

 

Running a business can be a grind and sometimes we can lose our own enthusiasm for the company. When this happens remind yourself again why you started the business and try to get excited about the next meeting you’re going to have. If others sense how excited you are they are more likely to be convinced and want to get involved. This in turn will give you more energy and enthusiasm so don’t waste the opportunity!

 

$190 Million Estate: America’s Most Expensive Home For Sale

$190 Million Estate: America’s Most Expensive Home For Sale

Greenwich, Conn. has long been known for its pricey ZIP codes, enviable proximity to New York City, and of course, a diaspora of wealthy Wall Street residents that has earned it a nickname as the hedge fund capital of the country. Now the tony town will be known for something else: as the location of America’s most expensive home for sale.

With an astounding asking price of $190 million, Copper Beech Farm has come to market as one of Greenwich’s last ‘Great Estates,’ a designation assigned by the Junior League of Greenwich in a 1986 coffee table book highlighting the town’s 46 most architecturally significant historic abodes. At that nine-figure price tag, Copper Beech Farm trumps every other U.S. residence publicly listed for sale, asking nearly 30% more than the country’s second most expensive home, the $135 million Crespi-Hicks estate in Dallas, Texas.

 

General Norman Schwarzkopf and Tony Robbins on Leadership

General Norman Schwarzkopf and Tony Robbins on Leadership

http://youtu.be/QlFLJbKhBg0

General Norman Schwarzkopf, the leader of Operation Desert Storm during the Gulf War, passed away recently at the age of 78. Tony shared the stage with General Schwarzkopf numerous times over the years. This clip is a speech on leadership he gave at an event in Dallas in 1999. General Schwarzkopf will always be remembered as an inspiring leader with a big heart.

 

“Conscious Capitalism” – Kip Tindell, Chairman & CEO, The Container Store

“Conscious Capitalism” – Kip Tindell, Chairman & CEO, The Container Store

Kip Tindell, Chairman and CEO of The Container Store, shares his perspectives on conscious capitalism and the relationship between business and society as he speaks to the Darden Leadership Speaker Series theme for this year, “What Does it Take?”. His visit is co-sponsored by, and served as the keynote kick-off for, the 2nd annual Business in Society Conference at Darden. Recorded 7 February 2013. For more information on the visions and values of The Container Store, visit http://standfor.containerstore.com/.

With Tindell at its helm for 34 years, Dallas-based The Container Store, the original storage and organization store, has 58 stores across the country. Stores average 25,000 square feet and are merchandised with more than 10,000 products designed to save space and time. Privately held, the retailer has posted a compounded annual growth rate of 24% since its inception. With 2012 fiscal year sales projected to reach $750 million, the originators of the storage and organization category of retailing remain the leaders in an industry that thrives.

With his focus on employees first, Tindell has nurtured a fierce loyalty to the company, which has an incredible number of employees who might never have dreamed of a career in retail. In fact, that employee-first culture has landed The Container Store on FORTUNE magazine’s list of “100 Best Companies to Work For” 13 years in a row.

Explore the cause rather than criticize the action – Zig Ziglar

Explore the cause rather than criticize the action – Zig Ziglar

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Worry is interest paid before it’s due – Zig Ziglar

Worry is interest paid before it’s due – Zig Ziglar

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The door to a balanced success opens wide on the hinges of hope and encouragement – Zig Ziglar

The door to a balanced success opens wide on the hinges of hope and encouragement – Zig Ziglar

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If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time – Zig Ziglar

If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time – Zig Ziglar

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Failure is a detour and not a dead-end street – Zig Ziglar

Failure is a detour and not a dead-end street – Zig Ziglar

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Where you start is not as important as where you finish – Zig Ziglar

Where you start is not as important as where you finish – Zig Ziglar

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