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I am not what happened to me. I am what I choose to be become. – Carl Jung

I am not what happened to me. I am what I choose to be become. – Carl Jung

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Dario Nardi – Neuroscience of Personality

UCLA professor and author, Dario Nardi, has discovered that people of different personality types don’t merely rely on different brain regions — they use their brains in fundamentally different ways. Using colorful anecdotes and brain imagery, Dr. Nardi shares key insights from his lab. Among these insights: how people of different personalities can find and sustain a state of creative flow. This talk is suitable for a general audience including those who have passing familiarity with the Myers-Briggs types.

 

Closing the Gap Between Where You Are and Where You Want To Be

In the majority of projects that I work on, whether they be for businesses or helping families live their dreams, the two biggest challenges that I normally encounter are 1) lack of clarity of what is really wanted; and 2) not understanding that structural dynamics need to be addressed to actually accomplish the new vision.

In regard to lack of clarity, if you do not know what you want, there are millions of ideas constantly bombarding you each day from other people that will continually take you off track from living your dreams. Unfortunately, I find this is true whether you are rich or poor. Therefore, if Clarity is an issue, you must first focus on your own inward journey of self-discovery before embarking on your outward journey of manifesting your desired results.

In regard to structural dynamics, imagine that you are a farmer with a river flowing through your land. Although you can use the water from the river to nourish your crops, the riverbed is fixed on how the river flows through your land. Problem solving only helps with strategies of pulling water from the river but does nothing to resolve the fundamental structure of the existing riverbed.

In his book, The Path of Least Resistance, Robert Fritz explains problem solving this way:

“At best, problem solving can bring temporary relief from a specific situation, but it seldom leads to final success….The path of least resistance in problem solving is to move from worse to better and then from better to worse again. This is because the actions taken are generated by the problem. If the intensity of the problem is lessened by the actions you took, there is less motivation to take further actions.”

Another way to look at this scenario is as follows:

The problem

leads to action to solve the problem

leads to

less intensity of the problem

leads to

less action to solve the problem

leads to

the problem remaining.

The psychologist Carl Jung said the following:

“All the greatest and most important problems of life are fundamentally insoluble…They can never be solved, but only outgrown. This “outgrowth” proved on further investigation to require a new level of consciousness. Some higher or wider interest appeared on the patient’s horizon, and through this broadening of his or her outlook the insoluble problem lost its urgency. It was not solved logically in its own terms but faded when confronted with a new and stronger life urge.”

Therefore, if you focus on what you truly value and what you really want, you can use the creative process to manifest your desires. As Robert Fritz goes on to say, “creators not only imagine or envision, they also have the ability to bring what they imagine into reality. Once a creation exists, an evolutionary process can take place. Each past creation builds a foundation for the next creation.” Therefore, the key question really is “what do you want to create?”