Post Tagged with: "Business"

 
  • Business Ideas: 3 Business Ideas from Estee Lauder’s Success

    Business Ideas: 3 Business Ideas from Estee Lauder’s Success by Evan Carmichael   Today we’re going to look at how a girl grew up with no money and lived in a small apartment with her parents and her eight siblings. She would go on to become the only woman on Time magazine’s list of the 20 most influential business geniuses of the century. This is the story of the woman super entrepreneur Estee Lauder and the top 3 lessons that you can learn from her success.   “If you don’t sell, it’s not the product that’s wrong, it’s you… I didn’t get there by wishing for it or hoping for it, but by working for it.” – Estee Lauder     Action Item #1: Don’t Stop at the First No   Lauder was known for her unwavering persistence. When she was trying to expand her European market she arranged a meeting with the manager of Galleries Lafayette, Europe’s largest department store. When the manager said no she ‘accidentally’ spilled her perfume samples on the floor and the store customers started asking how they could buy some of the fragrance. The manager had to give her a contract.   According to Lauder: “I have never worked a day in my life without selling. If I believe in something, I sell it and I sell it hard… If you have a goal, if you want to be successful, if you really want to do it and become another Estee Lauder, you’ve got to work hard, you’ve got to stick to it and you’ve got to believe in what you’re doing.”   Action Item #2: Love What You Do   Lauder loved her products so much that she paid attention to every little detail. When she got her first deal with Saks Fifth Avenue she stood at the entrance door for an entire week and watched women come in. Nine times out of ten, the first place their eyes would wander would be to the right. Not to the left. Not straight ahead. So she asked for her product to be placed on the right.   According to Lauder: “I love my product. I love to touch the creams, smell them, look at them, carry them with me. A person has to love her harvest if she’s to expect others to love it.”   Action Item #3: Sell, Sell, Sell   When Lauder was first getting started she didn’t have money to spend on advertising and promotions so she invested her time into product demos. She began at salons, hotels, subway stations, and even people on the street, offering them a free makeover and the chance to buy her products. She eventually moved to sell to the big department stores but it all began with a $0 budget and her grinding out sale after sale.   According to Lauder: “If you put the product into the customer’s hands, it will speak for itself if it’s something of quality… If you don’t sell, it’s not […]

     
  •  
  • Business Ideas – How to Be Enthusiastic Like Mary Kay Ash

    Business Ideas – How to Be Enthusiastic Like Mary Kay Ash by Evan carmichael     Evan Carmichael discusses how you break through with your business like one of the most successful women entrepreneurs of all time, Mary Kay Ash.   “Most successful people are ordinary people with extraordinary determination.” — Mary Kay Ash   Mary Kay Ash (May 12, 1918 — November 22, 2001) was an American businesswoman and founder of Mary Kay Cosmetics, Inc. Raised in a time when few women were in business, let alone successful in business, Ash broke down barriers on her rise up to creating a multi-billion dollar operation.   Ash used her $5,000 life savings to open a cosmetics company, Beauty by Mary Kay. Ash had bought the formula for a skin-care cream she was using as well as a storefront in Dallas, and began hiring friends as independent beauty consultants, her term for salespeople.   In its first year, company sales reached $198,000, primarily from sales sessions, or ‘skin care classes’, her sales team would hold in private homes. At the time of Ash’s death, Mary Kay Cosmetics had over 800,000 representatives in 37 countries, with total annual sales over $2 billion at retail.   Action Item #1: Break Down Barriers in Your Way   Starting a business is tough. It can be hard to get customers to believe in a new company and people will doubt your ability to succeed. At times you might even wonder if you made the right decision or if you’re better off going back and getting a job.   Mary Kay Ash was tired of being held back and being told that she was “just thinking like a woman.” Starting her own business was her chance to reach her full potential. According to Ash, “You cannot keep determined people from success. If you place stumbling blocks in their way, they will use them for stepping-stones and climb to new heights.”   No matter what challenges you come up against, remind yourself of why you started your business and what your vision is. Break big barriers down into small chunks and tackle them one by one until the problem is solved. Whatever you do, don’t give up!   Action Item #2: Live by the Golden Rule   Whether you are dealing with customers, suppliers, the media, employees, partners, or someone else who can have a meaningful impact on your business, remember that you’re dealing with a person and people like to be recognized and appreciated.   Mary Kay Ash’s advice is simple: “I have learned to imagine an invisible sign around each person’s neck that says ‘Make me feel important.’ I never cease to be amazed at how positively people react when they’re made to feel important. Everyone wants to be appreciated. So, if you appreciate someone, don’t keep it a secret.”   As a business owner there never seems to be enough time in the day to get everything done which can often cause us to […]

     
  •  
  • Business Ideas – 3 Business Lessons From Steve Wozniak

    Business Ideas – 3 Business Lessons From Steve Wozniak by Evan Carmichael       Today we’re going to look at how an entrepreneur whose father didn’t believe he would ever reach his goals set out to follow his passion for computers and built one of the largest companies in the world, quickly proving his father wrong. This is the story of Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak and the top 3 lessons that you can learn from his success.   “Don’t think about the money you don’t have. Rather, what can you do with what you do have?”– Steve Wozniak   Stephen “Woz” Wozniak (born August 11, 1950) is a Polish American computer engineer and programmer who co-founded Apple Inc. While in school, Wozniak tapped into his intense passion for computers and started designing computers on paper based on the theories that he knew. He told his father that he would one day own his own computer. When his father said “Well Steve, they cost as much as a house,” Wozniak replied, “Well, I’ll live in an apartment.”   Wozniak didn’t have friends growing up. He spent his time between his schoolwork and his experiments. Things changed, however, when he met Steve Jobs. With Jobs’ ability to convince people to give them parts, Wozniak went to work on building the Apple I. In 1976, Wozniak and Jobs started Apple together with the goal of making computers a tool everyone could use, not just big corporations.   Today, Apple has over $100 Billion in revenues and is one of the largest 50 companies in the world. In 2000, Wozniak was inducted into the National Hall of Fame and has received honorary degrees from multiple universities. His plan was never to start a company but rather to design computers. Luckily for the world, he decided to do both.     Action Item #1: Don’t Think About the Money You Don’t Have   Action Item #2: Focus   Action Item #3: Partner Up     True Story   Wozniak sold his HP calculator and Steve Jobs sold his Volkswagon van raising $1,300 to fund the launch of Apple. Jobs told Wozniak that even if they were not successful they could at least tell their grandkids they had their own company.  

     
  •  
  • Business Ideas: 3 Business Lessons From Henry Heinz

    Business Ideas: 3 Business Lessons From Henry Heinz by Evan Carmichael     Today we’re going to look at how the son of immigrant labourers went against the dream his parents had for him to become a preacher and built one of the most successful companies in the food production business. This is the story of Henry Heinz and the top 3 lessons that you can learn from his success.   “To do a common thing uncommonly well brings success.” – Henry J. Heinz   Action Item #1: Create a Catchy Slogan   Whatever industry you’re in, you probably have many competitors. How can you stand out from everyone else? A great way to cut through the clutter is to create a catchy slogan that highlights what you’re really good at.   Heinz was looking for a slogan while riding on a streetcar in New York one day in 1896. He then saw an advertisement for a shoe store; it read “21 Styles.” According to Heinz: “I said to myself, ‘we do not have styles of products, but we do have varieties of products. Counting up how many we had, I counted well beyond 57, but 57 kept coming back to my mind. Seven, seven — there are so many illustrations of the psychological influence of that figure and of its alluring significance to people of all ages and races that ’58 Varieties’ or ’59 Varieties’ did not appeal at all to me as being equally strong.”   With that, Heinz immediately jumped off the streetcar, went down to the print shop, and drafted up a card with the new 57 Varieties slogan. Reflecting back, Heinz acknowledged: “I myself did not realize how highly successful a slogan it was going to be.”   Action Item #2: Be Unique with Your Promotions   Another great way to cut through the clutter and have potential customers pay attention to you is to be unique with your promotional campaigns.   No tactic was too flashy or gaudy for Heinz. He wanted his products to stand out and shine — literally. In 1900, Heinz decided to erect the first ever electric sign in New York City, on the corner of Fifth Avenue and 23rd Street in Manhattan. Standing six stories tall, the sign was a large electric-lit pickle that bore the Heinz name and its “57 Varieties” slogan. In the display room below the sign, Heinz’s employees could be seen packing miniature pickles into bottles. The sign took 1,200 light bulbs to build and cost the company some $90 every night, but for Heinz, it was all worth it. For years, this electric pickle impressed shoppers along the famous New York strip and served as invaluable advertising.   Heinz was a master promoter, and was even responsible for pioneering one of the major trends in the industry. Obsessed with quality, freshness, and cleanliness, Heinz invented the concept of the “factory tour.” Anyone who was interested in seeing how Heinz produced and packaged his products […]

     
  •  
  • Business Ideas: Productivity in the Workplace for Entrepreneurs

    Business Ideas: Productivity in the Workplace for Entrepreneurs by Evan Carmichael     One of the most common questions I get asked is: How can I be more productive? There just never seems to be enough time in the day to get everything done. Today we’re going to talk about how you can eliminate, automate, and delegate your work to help you focus on your highest priority tasks, what I like to call CEO tasks.   Getting Started   The first thing you need to do is make a list of all the tasks that you do on a regular basis. This means everything from selling to customers, working with suppliers, invoicing, managing your cash flow, etc.   The second step is to bundle all your tasks into common themes. For example, making cold calls, attending networking events, and doing your email campaigns can all be under Sales & Marketing. Paying your staff, billing your clients, and keeping track of your expenses can all be called Admin. Continue classifying all your tasks until you have 5-7 main categories.   The third step is to figure out how much time you’re spending in each category. For example, you might spend 20 hours per week on Sales & Marketing, 10 hours per week on Admin, and so on.   Step 1: Eliminate   Step 2: Automate   Step 3: Delegate     Summary   The order of Eliminate, Automate, Delegate is very important. Eliminate is first. You don’t want to automate or delegate something that can be eliminated because it’s a non-productive task. Automate is next. You don’t want to delegate something that can be automated because it is more expensive and more prone to error.   Follow the steps I laid out to put your regular tasks into groups and then Eliminate, Automate, and Delegate everything away until you’re working only on the top priority CEO tasks.   It all starts with that first little step.  

     
  •  
  • Business Ideas – 3 Lessons From Brett Wilson

    Business Ideas – 3 Lessons From Brett Wilson by Evan Carmichael     Today we’re going to look at how an engineer discovered how his field was not for him and that business was more of his passion so he went back to school to get his MBA and focus on the business world. This man would go on to become one of the richest businessmen in Canada and is also well-known for his generosity. This is the story of Canadian entrepreneur Brett Wilson and the top 3 lessons that you can learn from his success.   “Innovative thinkers are constantly asking the question: How can we make things better? No matter what stage you’re at in your career or what industry you work in, everyone around you can benefit from new ideas. Don’t be afraid to think outside of the box – just because something works doesn’t mean it can’t be better.” – Brett Wilson   Brett Wilson (born July 1, 1957), a Canadian engineer, businessman and television personality is best known for his appearances on CBC’s Dragon’s Den. After growing up in a middle class family, his father a car salesman and mother a social worker, Wilson went off to college to study engineering. He would get his bachelor’s degree in engineering and go to work for one of the oil companies in Western Canada. However, after a few years of working as an engineer, he discovered that he wanted to do something else – business.   After going back to school to get his MBA, Wilson would join nine other friends to start an investment club. They each put in $200 and invested in the stock market. They would soon each get back $221, but more importantly, understand how the stock market worked, how commissions worked, how to buy and sell stocks, as well as learn to research and watch market trends. It wasn’t much money, but this small investment club got Wilson moving and drove him to wanting to do more in the business world. He would go on to work for an investment bank, but his entrepreneurial spirit was still not satisfied. He would bide his time, network, make contacts and learn everything he could, so one day he could start his own business.   Finally, he would create his own investment advisory firm and later team up with three partners to create a brokerage firm, FirstEnergy Capital, that would offer investment services to the oil and gas industry. Today, FirstEnergy Capital has handled more than $150 billion worth of mergers, acquisitions and asset sales. Wilson has been named one of the top 20 deal makers in Canada and one of the top 10 mergers and acquisitions specialists in Canada.  

     
  •  
  • Business Ideas – 3 Business Lessons From William Wrigley Jr

    Business Ideas – 3 Business Lessons From William Wrigley Jr by Evan Carmichael     Today we’re going to look at how a young man started his business with his life savings of $32, moved to a new city, changed his business twice, and eventually found his winning ticket and built a multi-billion company. This is the story of William Wrigley Jr. and the top 3 lessons that you can learn from his success.   “I have sometimes been asked what single policy has been most profitable in our business. I have always unhesitatingly answered, restraint in regard to immediate profits. That has not only been our most profitable policy, it has been pretty nearly our only profitable one.” – William Wrigley Jr.   William Wrigley Jr. (September 30, 1861–January 26, 1932) was a U.S. chewing gum entrepreneur and founder of the William Wrigley Jr. Company in 1891. He was 29 years old when he used his life savings of $32 to move to Chicago and start up his own soap manufacturing business. He started manufacturing and selling soap but with poor sales, Wrigley began offering a can of baking powder for free with each soap purchase.   Soon, Wrigley realized that his baking powder was more popular than his soap, so he switched to manufacturing baking powder full time, and instead offered free chewing gum as a bonus. And, in an all-too familiar pattern, Wrigley quickly saw his chewing gum bonus become more popular than the baking powder so he switched businesses again.   Wrigley passed away in 1932 at the age of 70. The company he founded went on to become the number one maker of chewing gum products in the world, with over 16,000 employees and revenues in excess of $5 billion in 2007. In 2008, Wrigley was acquired by Mars, Inc. for $23 billion.   Action Item #1: Give Something Extra Action Item #2: Don’t Focus on Immediate Profits   Action Item #3: Believe in Yourself     Quotes   “Everybody likes something extra, for nothing.”   “Even in a little thing like a stick of gum, quality is important.”   “Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.”  

     
  •  
  • Business Ideas – 3 Business Lessons From Calvin Klein

    Business Ideas – 3 Business Lessons From Calvin Klein by Evan Carmichael     Today we’re going to look at how a young entrepreneur had to decide between launching a fashion business or supermarket business. He chose fashion and created on of the most recognizable names in the industry. This is the story of Calvin Klein and the top 3 lessons that you can learn from his success.   “I think fantasies are for the birds. If there’s something I want, nothing stops me.” – Calvin Klein   Calvin Klein (born 1942) is an American fashion designer and founder of the company that bears his name. As a young child instead of playing sports like the other kids, Klein spent his time indoors teaching himself how to sketch and sew designs. He didn’t have many friends and would often accompany his mother on shopping trips throughout the city on her quest for discount clothing.   After graduating from the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York, Klein was practically broke, still working part-time at his father’s grocery store, and decided he would take his $2,000 life savings and start his own business. He started by designing a line of coats. The company’s first major step to success came by accident a year after its inception, when a businessman got off the elevator on the wrong floor and happened to wander into in Klein’s office. This businessman turned out to be a coat-buyer from the major department store Bonwit Teller. After placing an order for $50,000 worth of coats, he told Klein, “Tomorrow you will have been discovered.” In its first year, the company booked $1 million worth of business.   In 2002, Klein sold his company for $400 million and $30 million in stock. Before the sale, Calvin Klein Ltd. had 900 employees and worldwide sales of over $3 billion.   Action Item #1: Be The Expert   Action Item #2: Reach A Wide Audience   Action Item #3: Stay Focused     Quotes   ” I think fantasies are for the birds. If there’s something I want, nothing stops me.”   ” You can’t advertise for one group. Otherwise, you end up having a very small business!”   “Doing everything as well as possible meant survival.”  

     
  •  
 
 
 

FREE GIFT: Our #1 BestSelling Amazon Book on Infinite Returns

Enzo Calamo is the Best Selling co-author of "How To Create Infinite Returns In Real Estate Using The Secret Asset: How To Recover All Business and Personal Expenses Using The Secret Asset" This is a must read for every affluent investor.

CLICK HERE FOR YOUR FREE E-BOOK

 

Center for Family Conversations

The Center for Family Conversations (CFC) is a resource center that provides the integral tools and ideas in helping families establish a 100-year-plus Family Legacy Plan.

To learn more, click here....

 

Latest News

 

THANK YOU FOR VISITING!

  • 16,228
  • 13,997
  • 132,255
  • 665,958
  • 20,000,834
  • 36,052,146
  • 28,518
  • May 24, 2018
 
 
 
Translate »