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The source of economic value: Dr. William S. Silver

The source of economic value: Dr. William S. Silver

As Dean of the School of Business and Economics at Sonoma State University, Bill Silver has positioned SSU as the educational nucleus for a thriving North Bay economy. SSU is aligning the community to explore leading edge business practices — with the goal of innovating and collaborating in this time of economic transformation. As Silver reframes the role of the business school to become a community hub, he is drawing upon his lifelong passions for leadership, business, and learning.

In his TEDxTalk, Dr. Silver explores the source of economic value by using an example from the past, and one from the present. Silver compares the soda fountain of his family’s pharmacy, a social center of the New England town where he grew up, with the experience of making a “Starbucks run.” In this personal tribute to his father, he explores how more economic value can be created by developing an emotional resonance with customers; the most value is created when more is exchanged than dollars.

 

Jeff DeGraff – Competing Values Framework

Jeff DeGraff – Competing Values Framework

Yellow (Part 1)

Jeff DeGraff Explains the Competing Values Framework – “Collaborate” – at an Executive MBA program at the Ross Business School, University of Michigan

Blue (Part 2)

Red (Part 3)

Green (Part 4)

 

Jeff DeGraff: Revenue, Profits, and Speed (Compete / Blue)

Jeff DeGraff: Revenue, Profits, and Speed (Compete / Blue)

Jeff DeGraff, Dean of Innovation
Revenue, Profits, and Speed (Compete / Blue)

Now let’s talk about the compete quadrant or the blue quadrant which is all about revenue and it’s all about going really fast. Well, being a business school professor I could tell you a lot about this quadrant because that’s what we train MBAs to be, right? They’re these kind of hard charging, look for the money, find it, show the revenue, pay the shareholders, get after it. Well these people are very goal and action oriented. It’s all about getting after it right now and they’re very much impatient. They’re very matter-of-fact. They’re very aggressive. They’re extremely competitive so everything is kind of a race with each other. They’re very decisive so they don’t take a lot of time to make decisions and they’re very challenging.

 

What They Don’t Teach in Business School about Entrepreneurship

What They Don’t Teach in Business School about Entrepreneurship

A group of entrepreneurs talk about what they learned in the trenches that they never could have learned in a classroom. The panelists will also share the courses that were most helpful to them in their entrepreneurial ventures, the courses that they wished they had taken, and the topics that business schools should be teaching to aspiring entrepreneurs.

 

Eddie Obeng: Smart failure for a fast-changing world

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The world is changing much more rapidly than most people realize, says business educator Eddie Obeng — and creative output cannot keep up. In this spirited talk, he highlights three important changes we should understand for better productivity, and calls for a stronger culture of “smart failure.”

Our environment changes faster than we can learn about it, Eddie Obeng says. How do we keep up?

Why you should listen to him:

What will business look like in 5 years? (Er, what does it look like now?) Eddie Obeng helps executives keep up with a business and social environment that’s changing faster than we can know. Through Pentacle, his online business school, Obeng teaches a theory of management that focuses on adaptation to change. Called “New World Management,” it’s all about forming and re-forming workgroups, constantly re-evaluating metrics, and being open to all kinds of learning, from hands-on group exercises to a virtual lecture hall/meeting room called the QUBE.

“Making it happen” is Obeng’s constant refrain and his books are an antidote to the dryness of much managerial theorizing. They come complete with their lessons in fictional form. Old world they are not.”  Financial Times