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The Mayfair Set episode 1- Who Pays Wins

The Mayfair Set episode 1- Who Pays Wins – Lugen Family Office

 

the mayfair set

 

The power of words: Grace Taylor – Lugen Family Office

The power of words: Grace Taylor – Lugen Family Office

 

the power of words

 

Succession Planning for a Family Business

Succession Planning for a Family Business

 

succession planning for a family business

 

 

The power of pictures and stories: Janine Underhill

The power of pictures and stories: Janine Underhill

 

janine underhill

As the visual storyteller of TEDxCrestmoorParkED, Janine Underhill kicked off the event by sharing the power of storytelling, how she believes we have 8 seconds to capture the hearts and minds of kids and challenged the audience to ask the provocative questions and to continue the journey of sharing stories from the event.

 

H. Rafael Chacón- What My Genes Tell Me

H. Rafael Chacón- What My Genes Tell Me

 

 

Art Historian H. Rafael Chacón talks about how an academic exercise turned into a personal journey when he had his DNA sequenced by the National Geographic Geno 2.0 project. Rafael is professor of Art History and Criticism in the School of Art at the University of Montana. A specialist on renaissance and baroque art, Rafael teaches a range of topical courses on the history of art and art criticism. His academic interests lie in the ways societies articulate their most profound values through art; in particular he researches, lectures and writes about architectural history and historic preservation.

 

Abha Dawesar: Life in the “digital now”

Abha Dawesar: Life in the “digital now”

One year ago, Abha Dawesar was living in blacked-out Manhattan post-Sandy, scrounging for power to connect. As a novelist, she was struck by this metaphor: Have our lives now become fixated on the drive to digitally connect, while we miss out on what’s real?

Abha Dawesar writes to make sense of the world — herself included

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO HER?

Abha Dawesar began her writing career as an attempt to understand herself — at age 7. It’s a goal that remains at the center of her work: Sensorium, her most recent novel,explores the nature of time, self, and uncertainty, using Hindu mythology and modern science as prisms. “At a very basic level, writing was always my way of apprehending the world,” she has said.

Dawesar moved from India to the United States to study at Harvard, and Delhi appears at the center of her novels Family Values and Babyji. But the oversimplified genres of immigrant fiction or ethnic fiction do not appeal to her. “Those looking for a constant South Asian theme or Diaspora theme or immigrant theme will just be disappointed in the long run from my work,” she has said. “The only label I can put up with is that of a writer. And my ideas come from everywhere.”

 

Types Of Love

psych-quotes:

Types Of Love

Love, while wonderful, isn’t black and white, and it sure isn’t simple. There are lots of different types of love and we experience different types with the various people in our lives. Here are the types of love:

·        Romantic Love. This is often what people think of when they first think about love. Romantic love occurs between two people who are in a relationship and care deeply for each other. They are attracted to each other as friends, as well as physically and emotionally. Romantic love is the love we feel for our partners, and is often accompanied by things like butterflies in our stomach or thinking about them all the time.

·        Companionate Love. This is the kind of love we feel for our friends and we can also feel it with our partners as they grow into being our best friends. Companionate love is emotional and spiritual but lacks the physical aspect that romantic love has. With companionate love we care deeply about someone, love the way they contribute to our lives and want to see them happy. We are comfortable with them and have a routine of being together that bring happiness and comfort to both parties.

·        Unconditional Love. This is the type of love that we feel with our families, or in some cases, with very good friends. Unconditional love means that we will never stop loving someone, even if they hurt or disappoint us. When we love someone unconditionally there is no worry breaking up because the love is forever.

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Writing Our Way Out of Trouble: Sue Reynolds

Writing Our Way Out of Trouble: Sue Reynolds

The results of 25 years of research strongly indicates that writing down what distresses and dismays us not only makes us feel better – it improves our resistance to physical illness, decreases the symptoms of anxiety and depression, improves our sleep patterns, as well as providing a host of other benefits. This promising psycho-social intervention is available 24/7 to anyone with a modicum of literacy. Sue Reynolds will talk about her work facilitating creative writing with female inmates in the Provincial Corrections system, and about how the protocols for writing for health can help all of us in times of trouble.

BIO: Susan Lynn Reynolds is a freelance writer, an accredited writing instructor in the Amherst Writers and Artists’ method, former president of the Writers’ Community of Durham Region (WCDR) and former vice-chair of the national organization Canadian Creative Writers and Writing Programs.

Her YA novel won the Canadian Library Association’s national Young Adult Novel of the Year award, and she is also a winner of the Timothy Findley Creative Writing Prize for her short stories and poetry.

She is currently practicing psychotherapy under supervision towards the fulfillment of the requirements for her license as a psychotherapist.

Her area of specialty is the therapeutic use of journaling and memoir, and her thesis on that topic received the Canadian Psychological Association’s Award of Academic Excellence.

She has been leading writing workshops for female inmates at Central East Correctional Centre for six years and she received the June Callwood Award for Outstanding Volunteerism for that program.

The Future of Growing Up: Fred Penner

The Future of Growing Up: Fred Penner

Published on Jul 17, 2013

A gentle giant with kind eyes and an undeniable ability to make you feel good about yourself, this musical master brings 25 years of commitment, consistency and depth to a career that so skillfully blends the many genres of performing and communication, Billboard Magazine dubbed him “Mr. Multi-Media.”

More than the music, the two-time Juno winner and eight-time nominee’s body of work is about energy and emotional connection. The guy who crawled magically out of that hollow log for 12 seasons and nearly 900 episodes in the hit CBC TV show Fred Penner’s Place receives fan mail to this day from some of the 55 million American viewers where the show ran for four years on Nickelodeon in the U.S.

 

Pico Iyer: Where is home?

Pico Iyer: Where is home?

More and more people worldwide are living in countries not considered their own. Writer Pico Iyer — who himself has three or four “origins” — meditates on the meaning of home, the joy of traveling and the serenity of standing still.

Pico Iyer’s travel writing chronicles fascinating (and often jarring) examples of cultural mashups. Now he shows how travel can rescue us from our technological distractions.

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO HIM?

Acclaimed travel writer Pico Iyer began his career documenting a neglected aspect of travel — the sometimes surreal disconnect between local tradition and imported global pop culture. Since then, he has written ten books, exploring also the cultural consequences of isolation, whether writing about the exiled spiritual leaders of Tibet or the embargoed society of Cuba.

Iyer’s latest focus is on yet another overlooked aspect of travel: how can it help us regain our sense of stillness and focus in a world where our devices and digital networks increasing distract us? As he says: “Almost everybody I know has this sense of overdosing on information and getting dizzy living at post-human speeds. Nearly everybody I know does something to try to remove herself to clear her head and to have enough time and space to think. … All of us instinctively feel that something inside us is crying out for more spaciousness and stillness to offset the exhilarations of this movement and the fun and diversion of the modern world.”

“[Iyer] writes the kind of lyrical, flowing prose that could make Des Moines sound beguiling.”  Los Angeles Times