Home » Posts tagged 'Africa'

Tag Archives: Africa

Dambisa Moyo: Is China the new idol for emerging economies?

Dambisa Moyo: Is China the new idol for emerging economies?

 

china

The developed world holds up the ideals of capitalism, democracy and political rights for all. Those in emerging markets often don’t have that luxury. In this powerful talk, economist Dambisa Moyo makes the case that the west can’t afford to rest on its laurels and imagine others will blindly follow. Instead, a different model, embodied by China, is increasingly appealing. A call for open-minded political and economic cooperation in the name of transforming the world.

Dambisa Moyo is an international economist who analyzes the macroeconomy and global affairs.

 

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO HER?

 

Dambisa Moyo’s work examines the interplay between rapidly developing countries, international business, and the global economy — while highlighting opportunities for investment. She has travelled to more than 60 countries over the past decade, studying the political, economic and financial workings of emerging economies, in particular the BRICs and the frontier economies in Asia, South America, Africa and the Middle East. Her latest book,Winner Take All: China’s Race for Resources and What It Means for the World, looks at how commodities markets influence much more than the global economy — and examines the possible consequences of China’s unprecedented rush for commodities such as oil, minerals, water, and food, including the looming specter of commodity-driven conflict.

 

She is the author of the brilliantly argued Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa and How the West Was Lost: Fifty Years of Economic Folly and the Stark Choices Ahead. Previously, she was an economist at Goldman Sachs, where she worked for nearly a decade, and was a consultant to the World Bank in Washington.

 

Dambisa Moyo: Is China the new idol for emerging economies?

Dambisa Moyo: Is China the new idol for emerging economies?

[ted id=1842]

The developed world holds up the ideals of capitalism, democracy and political rights for all. Those in emerging markets often don’t have that luxury. In this powerful talk, economist Dambisa Moyo makes the case that the west can’t afford to rest on its laurels and imagine others will blindly follow. Instead, a different model, embodied by China, is increasingly appealing. A call for open-minded political and economic cooperation in the name of transforming the world.

Dambisa Moyo is an international economist who analyzes the macroeconomy and global affairs.

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO HER?

Dambisa Moyo’s work examines the interplay between rapidly developing countries, international business, and the global economy — while highlighting opportunities for investment. She has travelled to more than 60 countries over the past decade, studying the political, economic and financial workings of emerging economies, in particular the BRICs and the frontier economies in Asia, South America, Africa and the Middle East. Her latest book, Winner Take All: China’s Race for Resources and What It Means for the World, looks at how commodities markets influence much more than the global economy — and examines the possible consequences of China’s unprecedented rush for commodities such as oil, minerals, water, and food, including the looming specter of commodity-driven conflict.
She is the author of the brilliantly argued Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa and How the West Was Lost: Fifty Years of Economic Folly and the Stark Choices Ahead. Previously, she was an economist at Goldman Sachs, where she worked for nearly a decade, and was a consultant to the World Bank in Washington.

 

African’s billionaires has more than doubled

African’s billionaires has more than doubled

[youtube=

The number of African billionaires has more than doubled from 25 to 55 in the latest Ventures magazine African billionaire roll. Most of the super-rich live in Nigeria and South Africa. With Nigeria’s Aliko Dangote leading the pack followed by South Africa’s Allan Gray.

 

Imagination: Human mind viewed from chimpanzee mind: Tetsuro Matsuzawa

Imagination: Human mind viewed from chimpanzee mind: Tetsuro Matsuzawa

[youtube=

Prof. Matsuzawa is a professor at the Primate Research Institute of Kyoto University and president of the International Primatological Society. He entered Kyoto University as a philosophy major and enthusiastic mountain climber. After graduate school, Prof. Matsuzawa became an assistant professor at the Primate Research Institute of Kyoto University. In 1978, he started the “Ai-Project”, in which he taught language-like skills to chimpanzees. He continues to be active in primatology research, a field in which he is known to be a pioneer. He recently started the ʺGreen Corridor Projectʺ, which aims to protect wild chimpanzees and their habitat in Africa.

 

Finding Happiness Through Humor: Robert Haas

Finding Happiness Through Humor: Robert Haas

Congregation Mickve Israel’s new rabbi, Robert Haas, came to Savannah in 2012 by way of Texas, Israel and Africa. He was born in McAllen, Texas, graduated from the University of Texas at Austin, and taught in Houston’s public schools. He then lived and studied in Israel, entered rabbinical school and was ordained in the first Reform Rabbinical Class on the West Coast. After serving as a rabbi in Dallas and Houston, Robert went to Africa in 2011 as a volunteer with the American Jewish World Service. He now serves as the rabbi for the third oldest Jewish Congregation in America.

The Power of Writing: Rebecca Wallace-Segall

The Power of Writing: Rebecca Wallace-Segall

Rebecca Wallace-Segall is the founder and Executive Director of Writopia Lab and teaches writing workshops in NYC. She lectures at schools, events, and parents’ organizations on How to Inspire the Writer Within Your Child. She has been awarded recognition from The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards as an “outstanding educator” and has contributed op-eds about education and writing to The Atlantic Monthly and The Wall Street Journal.

 

Bono: The good news on poverty (Yes, there’s good news)

Bono: The good news on poverty (Yes, there’s good news)

[ted id=1691]

Human beings have been campaigning against inequality and poverty for 3,000 years. But this journey is accelerating. Bono “embraces his inner nerd” and shares inspiring data that shows the end of poverty is in sight … if we can harness the momentum.

Bono, the lead singer of U2, uses his celebrity to fight for social justice worldwide: to end hunger, poverty and disease, especially in Africa. His nonprofit ONE raises awareness via media, policy and calls to action.

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO HIM?

Irreverent, funny, iconoclastic and relentless, Bono has proven himself stunningly effective in encouraging and cajoling the world’s most powerful leaders to take seriously the challenge of disease and hunger and seize the historic opportunity we now have to beat extreme poverty, especially in Africa, through technological innovation, smart aid, transparency and investments which put citizens in charge.

As lead singer of U2, Bono performed at Live Aid in 1985, which inspired him to travel to Ethiopia with his wife, Ali. There they spent several weeks helping with a famine relief project. The experience shocked him and ignited a determination to work for change. In Bono’s own words, “What are the blind spots of our age? It might be something as simple as our deep-down refusal to believe that every human life has equal worth”. In 2005, the year of Make Poverty History, Bono became one of the inaugural winners of the TED Prize; he used his wish to raise awareness and inspire activism.

In 2002, he co-founded DATA (Debt, AIDS, Trade, Africa), which later became the advocacy and campaign organization, ONE. Today ONE has more than 3 million members who pressure politicians around the world to improve policies to empower the poorest. Thanks to these efforts, along with those of partners and grassroots leaders in Africa, these policies have delivered results. For example, eight million people are now on life preserving antiretoviral medications, malarial death rates have been halved in eight target countries, 50 million more children are in school and 5.4 million lives have been saved through vaccines.

In 2006, Bono and Bobby Shriver launched (RED) to engage the private sector in the fight against AIDS in Africa. (RED) Partners direct a portion of their profits from (RED)-branded products, services and events directly to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. In just six years, (RED) has contributed more than $200 million – every penny of which goes directly to HIV/AIDS programs with the goal of eliminating mother-to-child transmission of HIV. To date, (RED) dollars have helped the lives of more than 14 million people in Africa through education, testing, counseling, and treatment programs.

Bono also co-founded EDUN with his wife Ali. EDUN is a global fashion brand which does business in an number of countries in Africa and beyond, sourcing materials and manufacturing clothing. In Uganda, EDUN is supporting over 8,000 farmers in their move from subsistence to sustainable business practices.

Granted knighthood in 2007 and dubbed a “Man of Peace” in 2008, Bono mobilized in 2010 following the devastating earthquake in Haiti, performing the song “Stranded” with bandmate The Edge — and Rihanna and Jay-z — during the for Hope for Haiti Now telethon. The event was watched by 83 million people in the United States alone and raised a reported $58 million for relief.

Bono’s journey in activism spans a generation and where he is coming from, and above all where he is going, is something we should all pay close attention to.

 

On Transformational Leadership

On Transformational Leadership

Open, honest, humble, loving and compassionate are all attributes ascribed to Jonathan Jansen, Vice Chancellor of the University of the Free State in Bloemfontein, South Africa. In this video, Jansen and others, discuss the qualities of a transformational leader.

 

Managing a Family Business in Africa

Managing a Family Business in Africa

Part 1

According to the Small Enterprise Development Agency, family-owned businesses make up close to 50% of the economic growth of South Africa. Though only a few of the country’s iconic family companies have managed to remain in business over the decades. The trend is also relevant to the rest of the continent with the majority of SME’s operating as family-owned entities. How do you make sure that your family business retains its longevity across generations and are they the type of investments you should be looking at?

Part 2

 

Bruce Muzik – The BIG Secret Nobody Wants To Tell

Bruce Muzik – The BIG Secret Nobody Wants To Tell

bruce muzik

Bruce Muzik presents a riveting talk about the devastating impact that withholding secrets can have on our lives and what to do about it.

 

Bruce Muzik is a world class trainer and speaker. He is known as the “white man that lived for 6 months in a black ghetto” in post-apartheid South Africa.

 

His passion is having people experience unprecedented freedom and happiness, through being Authentic.