UHNW Blog

 
  • 5 Ways to Immigrate to Canada

    There are 5 basic ways to immigrate to Canada. Andy Semotiuk outlines them here. This video is not meant as advice for your particular situation. You should always consult legal counsel before making any decisions.   Count on Pace Law Firm to simplify immigration law. What may be new and complex to you or your firm is familiar to our lawyers. We’ve handled thousands of cases, and our team has had decades of legal experience on both sides of immigration disputes. Prior to entering private practice in 1993, our immigration director served as both a visa officer and Canadian consul with the Departments of Citizenship and Immigration Canada and Foreign Affairs and International Trade.  

     
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  • Easy Ways To Get A Green Card USA

    US offers several easy ways to get green card. A lot of ways to get green card like Family based, employment based, Marriage, Lottery, investors, adoption and more.   Do you want to file for a green card?   Do you want to sponsor a relative or spouse for his or her green card? If so, watch this video to obtain valuable information and tips on gaining permanent residency in the U.S.  

     
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  • U.S. EB-5 Investor Greencards

    Andy J. Semotiuk explains how foreign investors can use the EB-5 visa program to obtain permanent residency in the United States. Andy J. Semotiuk is a former United Nations correspondent, and a member of the California, New York, Ontario, B.C., and Alberta Bars. He has worked in all areas of U.S. as well as Canadian immigration law. Over the last 30 years Mr. Semotiuk has helped over 15,000 clients deal with various legal issues.  

     
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  • Learning from Great Leaders – General George S. Patton, Jr.

    “If everyone is thinking alike then somebody isn’t thinking.” “Accept the challenges so that you may feel the exhilaration of victory.” “Wars may be fought with weapons, but they are won by men. It is the spirit of the men who follow and of the man who leads that gains the victory.” General George Patton – Biography.com. “The most vital quality a soldier can possess is self-confidence.” “Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity.” “You must be single-minded. Drive for the one thing on which you have decided.” “Always do more than is required of you.” “Now if you are going to win any battle you have to do one thing. You have to make the mind run the body. Never let the body tell the mind what to do.” “For years I have been accused of making snap decisions. Honestly, this is not the case because I am a profound military student and thoughts I express, perhaps too flippantly, are the results of years of thought and study.” “I do not fear failure, I only fear the ‘slowing up’ of the engine inside of me which is pounding, saying, ‘Keep going, someone must be on top, why not you.’” “A pint of sweat will save a gallon of blood.’ “If a man has done his best, what else is there?’

     
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  • Learning from Great Leaders – Albert Einstein

    “Try not to become a man of success but rather try to become a man of value.” “A hundred times a day I remind himself that my life depends on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give, in the measure as I have received, and am still receiving.” Albert Einstein – Full Episode – Biography.com. “The high destiny of the individual is to serve rather than to rule.” “In the middle of difficulty lies opportunity.” “When I examine myself and my methods of thought, I come to the conclusion that the gift of fantasy has meant more to me than my talent for absorbing positive knowledge.” “Anger dwells only in the bosom of fools.” “He who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe is as good as dead; his eyes are closed.” “I never think of the future. It comes soon enough.” “When a man sits with a pretty girl for an hour, it seems like a minute. But let him sit on a hot stove for a minute – and it’s longer than any hour. That’s relativity.” “I think and think for months and years. Ninety-nine times, the conclusion is false. The hundredth time I am right.” “Solitude is painful when one is young, but delightful when one is more mature.” “The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and science.” “Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler.” “The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing. One cannot help but be in awe when he contemplates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries merely to comprehend a little of this mystery every day. Never lose a holy curiosity.”    

     
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  • Learning from Great Leaders – Benjamin Franklin

    “Wise men don’t need advice. Fools won’t take it.”   “Beware of little expenses. A small leak will sink a great ship.” “The world is full of fools and faint hearts; and yet everyone has courage enough to bear the misfortunes, and wisdom enough to manage the affairs, of his neighbor.”   “Blessed is he that expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed.”   “The heart of a fool is in his mouth, but the mouth of a wise man is in his heart.”   “If a man could have half his wishes, he would double his troubles.”   “Love your enemies, for they tell you your faults.”   “Guests, like fish, begin to smell after three days.”     There are no gains without pains.”   “Who is wise? He that learns from everyone. Who is powerful? He that governs his passions. Who is rich? He that is content. Who is that? Nobody.”

     
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  • Conrad Hilton – Biography

      Abstract from Wikipedia on Conrad Hilton:   Early life   C. Hilton was born in the unincorporated town of San Antonio currently known by the U.S. Census as San Antonito – Socorro County, in the New Mexico Territory. His father, Augustus Halvorsen “Gus” Hilton, was an immigrant from Norway, and his devout Catholic mother, Mary Genevieve (née Laufersweiler), was an American of German descent. Hilton grew up with eight siblings: Felice A. Hilton, Eva C. Hilton, Carl H. Hilton, Julian Hilton, Rosemary J. Hilton, August H. Hilton, Helen A. Hilton, and Baron Hilton.   Hilton attended Goss military (New Mexico Military Institute), and St. Michael’s College (now the College of Santa Fe), and the New Mexico School of Mines (now New Mexico Tech). He was a member of the international fraternity Tau Kappa Epsilon. In his early twenties, Hilton was a Republican representative in the first New Mexico Legislature, when the state was newly formed. He served two years in the U.S. Army during World War I.   The most enduring influence to shape Hilton’s philanthropic philosophy beyond that of his parents was the Roman Catholic Church and his sisters. He credited his mother with guiding him to prayer and the church whenever he was troubled or dismayed — from the boyhood loss of a beloved pony to severe financial losses during the Great Depression. His mother continually reminded him that prayer was the best investment he would ever make.   Career   As a young boy, Hilton developed entrepreneurial skills working at his father’s general store in Socorro County, New Mexico. His first hotel purchase was the 40-room Mobley Hotel in Cisco, Texas, in 1919, an investment decision made after his plan to invest in a bank in the oil-boom town fell through; the hotel did such brisk business that rooms changed hands as much as three times a day. He went on to buy hotels throughout Texas. The first high rise hotel he built was the Dallas Hilton, which opened in 1925. This was followed by the Abilene Hilton in 1927, Waco Hilton in 1928, and El Paso Hilton in 1930. He built his first hotel outside of Texas in 1939 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. It is today known as the Hotel Andaluz. During the Great Depression Hilton was nearly forced into bankruptcy and lost several of his hotels. He was retained as manager, however, and eventually bought them back. He formed the Hilton Hotels Corporation in 1946 followed by Hilton International Company, in 1948.   During the 1950s and 1960s, Hilton Hotels’ worldwide expansion facilitated both American tourism and overseas business by American corporations. At the same time, it promulgated a certain worldwide standard for hotel accommodations. It was the world’s first international hotel chain. In all, Hilton eventually owned 188 hotels in thirty-eight cities in the U.S., including the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D. C., the Palmer House in Chicago, and the Plaza Hotel and Waldorf-Astoria in New York City, along with fifty-four hotels abroad. […]

     
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  • Milton Friedman – The Robber Baron Myth

    Milton Friedman – The Robber Baron Myth The Myth of the Robber Barons describes the role of key entrepreneurs in the economic growth of the United States from 1850 to 1910. The entrepreneurs studied are Cornelius Vanderbilt, John D. Rockefeller, James J. Hill, Andrew Mellon, Charles Schwab, and the Scranton family. Most historians argue that these men, and others like them, were Robber Barons. The story, however, is more complicated. The author, Burton Folsom, divides the entrepreneurs into two groups market entrepreneurs and political entrepreneurs. The market entrepreneurs, such as Hill, Vanderbilt, and Rockefeller, succeeded by producing a quality product at a competitive price. The political entrepreneurs such as Edward Collins in steamships and in railroads the leaders of the Union Pacific Railroad were men who used the power of government to succeed. They tried to gain subsidies, or in some way use government to stop competitors. The market entrepreneurs helped lead to the rise of the U. S. as a major economic power. By 1910, the U. S. dominated the world in oil, steel, and railroads led by Rockefeller, Schwab (and Carnegie), and Hill. The political entrepreneurs, by contrast, were a drain on the taxpayers and a thorn in the side of the market entrepreneurs. Interestingly, the political entrepreneurs often failed without help from government they could not produce competitive products. The author describes this clash of the market entrepreneurs and the political entrepreneurs. In the Mellon chapter, the author describes how Andrew Mellon an entrepreneur in oil and aluminum became Secretary of Treasury under Coolidge. In office, Mellon was the first American to practice supply-side economics. He supported cuts on income tax rates for all groups. The rate cut on the wealthiest Americans, from 73 percent to 25 percent, freed up investment capital and led to American economic growth during the 1920s. Also, the amount of revenue into the federal treasury increased sharply after tax rates were cut. The Myth of the Robber Barons has separate chapters on Vanderbilt, Hill, Schwab, Mellon, and the Scrantons. The author also has a conclusion, in which he looks at the textbook bias on the subject of Robber Barons and the rise of the U. S. in the late 1800s. This chapter explores three leading college texts in U. S. history and shows how they misread American history and disparage market entrepreneurs instead of the political entrepreneurs. This book is in its fifth edition, and is widely adopted in college and high school classrooms across the U. S.  

     
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