Home » Warren Buffet

Category Archives: Warren Buffet

Buffett helps Burger King bite off U.S. tax

Buffett helps Burger King bite off U.S. tax

 

Warren Buffett’s company Berkshire Hathaway is helping fund Burger King’s corporate move to Canada. Does it mesh with his previous comments on taxes?

The Giving Pledge – WARREN BUFFETT

The Giving Pledge – WARREN BUFFETT

 

Warren-Buffett-9230729-1-402

 

 

“Were we to use more than 1% of my claim checks (Berkshire Hathaway stock certificates) on ourselves, neither our happiness nor our well-being would be enhanced. In contrast, that remaining 99% can have a huge effect on the health and welfare of others.”

Buffettinfo-Letter-1

 

Chuck Feeney – Recipient Of The Forbes 400 Lifetime Achievement Award For Philanthropy

Chuck Feeney: Recipient Of The Forbes 400 Lifetime Achievement Award For Philanthropy

 

Warren Buffett commends the founder of Atlantic Philanthropies, an organization that has pledged more than $6.5 billion in grants to promote education, health, peace and human dignity throughout the world. 

Bob Browne: A Lesson in Tax-Deferred Investing from Warren Buffett

Bob Browne: A Lesson in Tax-Deferred Investing from Warren Buffett

 

As investors look to build wealth, they can learn both tax strategy and investment strategy lessons from Warren Buffett’s recent sale of Graham Holdings Company.

 

Buffett on technology replacing jobs

Buffett on technology replacing jobs

 

Warren Buffett explains why he thinks it’s progress to have technology replacing human jobs, but acknowledges that people who are left behind need support. 

Warren Buffett on Giving Away His Money and the Gates Foundation

Warren Buffett on Giving Away His Money and the Gates Foundation

 

warren buffett

 

The Giving Pledge is a campaign to encourage the wealthiest people in the world to make a commitment to give most of their wealth to philanthropic causes. The campaign specifically focuses on billionaires and was made public in 2010 by Warren Buffett and Bill Gates. The Huffington Post reported in April 2012 that “81 billionaires committed to giving at least half of their fortunes to charity”. As of April 2013, 105 billionaires have signed the pledge.

The following are signatories to the Giving Pledge as of April 2013:[12] Bill Ackman and wife Karen Paul Allen John D. Arnold and wife Laura Manoj Bhargava[13] Steve Bing Nicolas Berggruen Sara Blakely[14] Arthur Blank Michael Bloomberg Richard Branson[15] and wife Joan Eli Broad and wife Edythe Charles Bronfman[13] Edgar M. Bronfman Warren Buffett Steve Case and wife Jean John Caudwell Leon G. Cooperman and wife Toby Joe Craft Joyce and Bill Cummings Ray Dalio and wife Barbara John Paul DeJoria John Doerr and wife Ann Doerr Barry Diller and Diane von Furstenberg Glenn Dubin and wife Eva Larry Ellison Chuck Feeney Andrew Forrest and wife Nicola Ted Forstmann Phillip Frost and wife Patricia Bill and Melinda Gates Dan Gilbert and wife Jennifer[13] David Green and wife Barbara Jeff Greene and wife Mei Sze Harold Hamm and wife Sue Ann Reed Hastings and wife Patty Quillin[13] Lyda Hill Barron Hilton Chris Hohn Jon Huntsman, Sr. and wife Karen Mo Ibrahim Carl Icahn Irwin M. Jacobs and wife Joan George Kaiser Vinod Khosla and wife Neeru Sidney Kimmel Richard Kinder and wife Nancy Kenneth Langone and wife Elaine H.F. Lenfest and wife Marguerite Peter B. Lewis[13] Lorry I. Lokey George Lucas Duncan MacMillan and wife Nancy Alfred E. Mann Joe Mansueto and wife Rika Bernie Marcus and wife Billi Red McCombs and wife Charline Michael Milken and wife Lori George P. Mitchell Tom Monaghan Gordon Moore and wife Betty[13] John Morgridge and wife Tashia Dustin Moskovitz and Cari Tuna Patrice Motsepe and wife Precious Elon Musk Jonathan M. Nelson[13] Pierre Omidyar and wife Pam Bernard Osher and wife Barbro Ronald Perelman Jorge M. Perez and wife Darlene[13] Peter George Peterson T. Boone Pickens Victor Pinchuk Hasso Plattner Vladimir Potanin Azim Premji[16] Julian Robertson David Rockefeller Edward W. and Deedie Potter Rose David M. Rubenstein David Sainsbury John Sall and wife Ginger Henry Samueli and wife Susan Herb and Marion Sandler Vicki and Roger Sant Denny Sanford Lynn Schusterman Walter Scott, Jr. Thomas Secunda and wife Cindy Harold Simmons and wife Annette Jim and Marilyn Simons Jeff Skoll John A. Sobrato, wife Susan and son John Michael Sobrato Patrick Soon-Shiong and wife Michele B. Chan Ted and Vada Stanley Tom Steyer and wife Kat Taylor James E. Stowers and wife Virginia Vincent Tan Claire and Leonard Tow[13] Ted Turner Albert Lee Ueltschi[13] Dr. Romesh Wadhwani and wife Kathleen[13] Sanford Weill and wife Joan Shelby White, widow of non-signatory Leon Levy Charles Zegar and wife Merryl Snow Mark Zuckerberg 

Warren Buffett & Bill Gates on Measuring Performance – Lugen Family Office

Warren Buffett & Bill Gates on Measuring Performance, Wealth, Billionaires, Financial Crisis

 

warren buffett bill gates

Performance measurement is the process of collecting, analyzing and/or reporting information regarding the performance of an individual, group, organization, system or component. It can involve studying processes/strategies within organizations, or studying engineering processes/parameters/phenomena, to see whether output are in line with what was intended or should have been achieved.

 

Performance measurement has been defined by Neely[1] as “the process of quantifying the efficiency and effectiveness of past actions”, while Moullin[2] defines it as “the process of evaluating how well organisations are managed and the value they deliver for customers and other stakeholders”. Discussion on the relative merits of these definitions appeared in several articles in the newsletter of the Performance Management Association.[3]

 

Wikipedia – Performance Measurement

 

The wealth effect is an economic term, referring to an increase (decrease) in spending that accompanies an increase (decrease) in perceived wealth.

 

The effect would cause changes in the amounts and distribution of consumer consumption caused by changes in consumer wealth. People should spend more when one of two things is true: when people actually are richer, objectively, or when people perceive themselves to be richer—for example, the assessed value of their home increases, or a stock they own goes up in price.

 

Demand for some goods (especially Inferior goods) typically decreases with increasing wealth. For example, consider consumption of cheap fast food versus steak. As someone becomes wealthier, their demand for cheap fast food is likely to decrease, and their demand for more expensive steak may increase.

 

Consumption may be tied to relative wealth. Particularly when supply is highly inelastic – or in the case of monopoly – one’s ability to purchase a good may be highly related to one’s relative wealth in the economy. Consider for example the cost of real estate in a city with high average wealth (for example New York or London), in comparison to a city with a low average wealth. Supply is fairly inelastic, so if a helicopter drop (or gold rush) were to suddenly create large amounts of wealth in the low wealth city, those who did not receive this new wealth would rapidly find themselves crowded out of such markets, and materially worse off in terms of their ability to consume/purchase real estate (despite having participated in a weak Pareto improvement). In such situations, one cannot dismiss the relative effect of wealth on demand and supply, and cannot assume that these are static. (see also General equilibrium).

 

However, according to David Backus, an NYU economist, the wealth effect is not observable in economic data, at least in regards to increases or decreases in home or stock equity.[2] For example, while the stock market boom in the late 1990s (q.v. dot-com bubble) increased the wealth of Americans, it did not produce a significant change in consumption, and after the crash, consumption did not decrease.[2]

 

Economist Dean Baker disagrees and says that “housing wealth effect” is well-known and is a standard part of economic theory and modeling, and that economists expect households to consume based on their wealth. He cites approvingly research done by Carroll and Zhou that estimates that households increase their annual consumption by 6 cents for every additional dollar of home equity.[3]

 

The wealth effect and the Paradox of Thrift are contradictory. The paradox assumes, incorrectly, that people will spend when they feel wealthy, based on the wealth effect, but not when they are actually more wealthy.

 

Wikipedia – The Wealth Effect

 

Buffett Grandson: Our Plans to Change the World

Buffett Grandson: Our Plans to Change the World

[youtube=

 

Sept. 17, 2013 (Bloomberg) — Howard W. Buffett, executive director of the Howard G. Buffett Foundation, talks about his public management class at Columbia University and new book “40 Chances: Finding Hope in a Hungry World.” Buffett is the son of Berkshire Hathaway Inc. Director Howard Buffett and grandson of Chairman Warren Buffett. He speaks with Betty Liu on Bloomberg Television’s “In the Loop.” (Source: Bloomberg)

 

Three Generations of Buffett: We’re the Lucky Ones

Three Generations of Buffett: We’re the Lucky Ones

[youtube=

 

Oct. 23, 2013 (Bloomberg) — Together on set for a Bloomberg First, CEO of Berkshire Hathaway Warren Buffett, his son Howard Buffett and grandson Howard W. Buffett join Bloomberg’s Betty Liu to discuss philanthropy, their plans for Berkshire Hathaway, and their new book “40 Chances.” They speak on Bloomberg Television’s “In The Loop.”

 

Three qualities that the people you hire should have

Translate »