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Diana Nyad: Never, ever give up – Lugen Family Office

Diana Nyad: Never, ever give up – Lugen Family Office

 

diana nyad

 

In the pitch-black night, stung by jellyfish, choking on salt water, singing to herself, hallucinating … Diana Nyad just kept on swimming. And that’s how she finally achieved her lifetime goal as an athlete: an extreme 100-mile swim from Cuba to Florida — at age 64. Hear her story.

A record-setting long-distance swimmer, Diana Nyad writes and thinks deeply about motivation. 

 

Why You Should Listen To Her?

 

For ten years (1969-1979), Diana Nyad was known as the greatest long-distance swimmer in the world. In 1979, she stroked the then-longest swim in history, making the 102.5-mile journey from the island of Bimini (Bahamas) to Florida. She also broke numerous world records, including what had been a 50-year mark for circling Manhattan Island, setting the new time of 7 hrs 57 min. She is a member of the National Women’s Hall of Fame and the International Swimming Hall of Fame.

 

At age 60, having not swum a stroke in decades, she began planning for her white whale of distance swims: the 110-mile ocean crossing between Cuba and Florida. She’d tried it once, in her 20s, and severe jellyfish attacks had defeated her then. But now, with a strong team and a new commitment to her vision, she stepped back into the salt. She spoke about this second attempt at TEDMED 2011. And at TEDWomen 2013, in December, she talks about how it feels to have finally done it.

 

Nyad appears as part of a weekly five-minute radio piece on sports for KCRW called “The Score” (heard during KCRW’s broadcast of NPR’s All Things Considered), as well as for the Marketplace radio program.

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Eventually No One Will Feel Ostracized – Embracing Differences: Erika Gruidl

Eventually No One Will Feel Ostracized – Embracing Differences: Erika Gruidl

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See how one high school student created a team to overcome bureaucracy and life-long lessons in ignoring those with differences, causing a local school to step away from the exclusive mentality of high school and embrace the differences of six remarkable students. Special needs students that had been isolated in the school system became super stars at Livermore High. The change initiated in 2011 persisted with incoming Freshman, as the student body demonstrated to the younger students, who had not yet seen the Shooting Stars, ‘how to act with those with differences.’

Erika Gruidl, Founder of Shooting Stars, a cheer squad comprised of Special Needs students, speaks about the journey in creating a world where everyone feels welcomed. Erika loved performing as a varsity cheerleader for her school and believed Special Needs students deserved the chance to experience the same sort of joy. After initial resistance, the Shooting Stars were ultimately acknowledged, recognized and welcomed by the entire student body.

 

Every successful person has a painful story

Strategic agility through intelligences: Baba Prasad

Strategic agility through intelligences: Baba Prasad

Writing Our Way Out of Trouble: Sue Reynolds

Writing Our Way Out of Trouble: Sue Reynolds

The results of 25 years of research strongly indicates that writing down what distresses and dismays us not only makes us feel better – it improves our resistance to physical illness, decreases the symptoms of anxiety and depression, improves our sleep patterns, as well as providing a host of other benefits. This promising psycho-social intervention is available 24/7 to anyone with a modicum of literacy. Sue Reynolds will talk about her work facilitating creative writing with female inmates in the Provincial Corrections system, and about how the protocols for writing for health can help all of us in times of trouble.

BIO: Susan Lynn Reynolds is a freelance writer, an accredited writing instructor in the Amherst Writers and Artists’ method, former president of the Writers’ Community of Durham Region (WCDR) and former vice-chair of the national organization Canadian Creative Writers and Writing Programs.

Her YA novel won the Canadian Library Association’s national Young Adult Novel of the Year award, and she is also a winner of the Timothy Findley Creative Writing Prize for her short stories and poetry.

She is currently practicing psychotherapy under supervision towards the fulfillment of the requirements for her license as a psychotherapist.

Her area of specialty is the therapeutic use of journaling and memoir, and her thesis on that topic received the Canadian Psychological Association’s Award of Academic Excellence.

She has been leading writing workshops for female inmates at Central East Correctional Centre for six years and she received the June Callwood Award for Outstanding Volunteerism for that program.

The Future of Growing Up: Fred Penner

The Future of Growing Up: Fred Penner

Published on Jul 17, 2013

A gentle giant with kind eyes and an undeniable ability to make you feel good about yourself, this musical master brings 25 years of commitment, consistency and depth to a career that so skillfully blends the many genres of performing and communication, Billboard Magazine dubbed him “Mr. Multi-Media.”

More than the music, the two-time Juno winner and eight-time nominee’s body of work is about energy and emotional connection. The guy who crawled magically out of that hollow log for 12 seasons and nearly 900 episodes in the hit CBC TV show Fred Penner’s Place receives fan mail to this day from some of the 55 million American viewers where the show ran for four years on Nickelodeon in the U.S.

 

What we learned from 5 million books – Erez Lieberman Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel

What we learned from 5 million books – Erez Lieberman Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel

Have you played with Google Labs’ Ngram Viewer? It’s an addicting tool that lets you search for words and ideas in a database of 5 million books from across centuries. Erez Lieberman Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel show us how it works, and a few of the surprising things we can learn from 500 billion words.

 

Developing Leaders with 21st Century Skills: Dennis Riksen

Developing Leaders with 21st Century Skills: Dennis Riksen

Dennis Riksen made a career change from sales to teaching. He learns from the children every day. “Children teach me how M&M’s are far better than money, you can eat them! And McDonald’s is a four star restaurant!” Dennis tells of the “The Leader in Me” program that emphasises a culture of student empowerment, helps unleash each child’s full potential and gives them what they need most in there fast changing, busy and hectic life. It gives them an edge………….

 

Narrative Humility: Sayantani DasGupta

Narrative Humility: Sayantani DasGupta

Sayantani is a physican and writer, originally trained in pediatrics and public health, who is a faculty member in the Master’s Program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia University and the Graduate Program in Health Advocacy at Sarah Lawrence College. Sayantani teaches courses on illness and disability memoir, and narrative, health and social justice. She is a widely published and nationally recognized speaker on issues of narrative, health care, race, gender and medical education, and in 2012 was featured in Oprah Magazine in an article on Narrative Medicine – which she describes as the clinical and scholarly movement to find health care’s lost art of story-telling and story listening. She is the co-author of The Demon Slayers and Other Stories: Bengali Folktales, the author of a memoir about her education at Johns Hopkins, Her Own Medicine: A Woman’s Journey from Student to Doctor, and the co-editor of an award winning collection of women’s illness narratives, Stories of Illness and Healing: Women Write their Bodies.

Stories have always been at the heart of health and healing. Before fancy imaging equipment or lab tests in their metaphorical black bags, they had the ability to be present, to witness another human being’s life and death, suffering and joy. Narrative medicine is the clinical and scholarly movement to find health care’s lost art of storytelling and story listening. A narrative understanding of health care honors the ancient, storied heart of healing, while teaching those responding to stories—clinicians, therapists, family members, and advocates—how to go about the art of witnessing. Witnessing stories from a position of Narrative Humility acknowledges that stories of the ill are not objects in which to become ‘competent’ or master, but rather, dynamic entities that for healers to approach and engage with, while simultaneously remaining open to their ambiguity and contradiction, and engaging in constant self-evaluation and self-critique about issues like the witnesses role in the story, expectations of the story, responsibilities to the story, and identifications with the story. Narrative humility is a philosophy of listening which holds potential beyond health care as well, in any situation where more powerful individuals engage with stories of those who are socially, culturally or politically less powerful. It acknowledges that the listener — be that a clinician, reporter, policy maker, or teacher — must willingly place herself in a position of some transparency. The witness must not only see, but be seen, and by doing so, enable herself to see even more clearly.