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Bloomberg – Game Changers (Steve Jobs)

Bloomberg – Game Changers (Steve Jobs)

 

 

Jack Andraka: A promising test for pancreatic cancer … from a teenager

Over 85 percent of all pancreatic cancers are diagnosed late, when someone has less than two percent chance of survival. How could this be? Jack Andraka talks about how he developed a promising early detection test for pancreatic cancer that’s super cheap, effective and non-invasive — all before his 16th birthday.

A paper on carbon nanotubes, a biology lecture on antibodies and a flash of insight led 15-year-old Jack Andraka to design a cheaper, more sensitive cancer detector.

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO HIM?

After Andraka’s proposal to build and test his idea for a pancreatic cancer detector was rejected from 199 labs, the teen landed at Johns Hopkins. There, he built his device using inexpensive strips of filter paper, carbon nanotubes and antibodies sensitive to mesothelin, a protein found in high levels in people with pancreatic cancer. When dipped in blood or urine, the mesothelin adheres to these antibodies and is detectable by predictable changes in the nanotubes’ electrical conductivity.

In preliminary tests, Andraka’s invention has shown 100 percent accuracy. It also finds cancers earlier than current methods, costs a mere 3 cents and earned the high schooler the 2012 Intel Science Fair grand prize.

“This kid is the Edison of our times. There are going to be a lot of light bulbs coming from him”  Dr. Anirban Maitra, Johns Hopkins University, The Baltimore Sun 5/24/2012

Lessons of Steve Jobs: Guy Kawasaki

Lessons of Steve Jobs: Guy Kawasaki

Guy Kawasaki is the author of APE, What the Plus!, Enchantment, and nine other books. He is also the co-founder of Alltop.com, an “online magazine rack” of popular topics on the web. Previously, he was the chief evangelist of Apple. Kawasaki has a BA from Stanford University and an MBA from UCLA as well as an honorary doctorate from Babson College.

 

Your time is limited – Steve Jobs

Your time is limited – Steve Jobs

Your time is limited - Steve Jobs

Sell Your Ideas the Steve Jobs Way

Sell Your Ideas the Steve Jobs Way

In his talk, Carmine Gallo demonstrates how extraordinary leaders such as Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, and others communicate the vision and the value behind their service, product, or brand.

Gallo addressed the Stanford GSB as part of the Mastery in Communication Initiative’s Expert Speaker Series. Gallo is author of “The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs” .

Former Apple CEO Steve Jobs’s wildly popular presentations have set a new global gold standard—and now this step-by-step guide shows you exactly how to use his crowd-pleasing techniques in your own presentations.

The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs is as close as you’ll ever get to having the master presenter himself speak directly in your ear. Communications expert Carmine Gallo has studied and analyzed the very best of Jobs’s performances, offering point-by-point examples, tried-and-true techniques, and proven presentation secrets that work every time.

With this revolutionary approach, you’ll be surprised at how easy it is to sell your ideas, share your enthusiasm, and wow your audience the Steve Jobs way.

“No other leader captures an audience like Steve Jobs does and, like no other book, The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs captures the formula Steve uses to enthrall audiences.” Rob Enderle, The Enderle Group

“Now you can learn from the best there is—both Jobs and Gallo. No matter whether you are a novice presenter or a professional speaker like me, you will read and reread this book with the same enthusiasm that people bring to their iPods.”  David Meerman Scott, bestselling author of The New Rules of Marketing & PR and World Wide Rave

Steve Jobs – Billion Dollar Hippy

Steve Jobs Biography:
Broadly considered a brand that inspires fervour and defines cool consumerism, Apple has become one of the biggest corporations in the world, fuelled by game-changing products that tap into modern desires. Its leader, Steve Jobs, was a long-haired college dropout with infinite ambition, and an inspirational perfectionist with a bully’s temper. A man of contradictions, he fused a Californian counterculture attitude and a mastery of the art of hype with explosive advances in computer technology.

Insiders including Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak, the chairman who ousted Jobs from the company he founded, and Jobs’ chief of software, tell extraordinary stories of the rise, fall and rise again of Apple with Steve Jobs at its helm.

With Stephen Fry, world wide web inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee and branding guru Rita Clifton, Evan Davis decodes the formula that took Apple from suburban garage to global supremacy.

Bio:
Steven Paul Jobs (February 24, 1955 — October 5, 2011) was an American businessman and inventor widely recognized as a charismatic pioneer of the personal computer revolution. He was co-founder, chairman, and chief executive officer of Apple Inc. Jobs was co-founder and previously served as chief executive of Pixar Animation Studios; he became a member of the board of directors of The Walt Disney Company in 2006, following the acquisition of Pixar by Disney.

In the late 1970s, Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak engineered one of the first commercially successful lines of personal computers, the Apple II series. Jobs directed its aesthetic design and marketing along with A.C. “Mike” Markkula, Jr. and others.

In the early 1980s, Jobs was among the first to see the commercial potential of Xerox PARC’s mouse-driven graphical user interface, which led to the creation of the Apple Lisa (engineered by Ken Rothmuller and John Couch) and, one year later, of Apple employee Jef Raskin’s Macintosh. After losing a power struggle with the board of directors in 1985, Jobs left Apple and founded NeXT, a computer platform development company specializing in the higher-education and business markets.

In 1986, he acquired the computer graphics division of Lucasfilm Ltd, which was spun off as Pixar Animation Studios. He was credited in Toy Story (1995) as an executive producer. He remained CEO and majority shareholder at 50.1 percent until its acquisition by The Walt Disney Company in 2006, making Jobs Disney’s largest individual shareholder at seven percent and a member of Disney’s Board of Directors.

In 1996, NeXT was acquired by Apple. The deal brought Jobs back to the company he co-founded, and provided Apple with the NeXTSTEP codebase, from which the Mac OS X was developed.” Jobs was named Apple advisor in 1996, interim CEO in 1997, and CEO from 2000 until his resignation. He oversaw the development of the iMac, iTunes, iPod, iPhone, and iPad and the company’s Apple Retail Stores.

In 2003, Jobs was diagnosed with a rare form of pancreatic cancer. Though it was initially treated, Jobs reported of a hormone imbalance, underwent a liver transplant in 2009, and appeared progressively thinner as his health declined. In August 2011, during his third medical leave, Jobs resigned as CEO, but continued to work for Apple as Chairman of the Board until his death.

On October 5, 2011, he died in his Palo Alto home, aged 56. His death certificate listed respiratory arrest as the immediate cause of death, with “metastatic pancreas neuroendocrine tumor” as the underlying cause. His occupation was listed as “entrepreneur” in the “high tech” business.

 

Bloomberg Game Changers: Steve Jobs

 

Tribute to Steve Jobs Think Different

This video is a tribute to Steve Jobs, remember his contribution to this world forever.

12 Lessons Steve Jobs Taught Guy Kawasaki

Guy Kawasaki survived working for Steve Jobs twice. At Silicon Valley Bank’s CEO Summit on October 6, 2011, Guy shared lessons learned from the entrepreneur of the 21st century.

Innovate the Pixar Way by Bill Capodagli

Business Lessons from the World’s Most Creative Corporate Playground, Pixar

“This tremendous book brings the magic and genius of Pixar to the page and lets us in on the secrets and intuitive synergy of such a successful company.”Stephen R. Covey, author of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People and The 8th Habit: From Effectiveness to Greatness

“Pixar is one of the most creative organizations in the world. Read Innovate the Pixar Way and explore the true beauty in how they sustain the environment. Who knows, maybe a little Pixar dust will fall on you!” — John Christensen, coauthor of Fish! and playground director AKA: CEO, ChartHouse Learning

“Creativity makes it possible for our dreams to become real–my life is my proof. This book puts all those possibilities in the hands of the reader . . . for those who will be creating the future.” — Carol Lawrence, singer, dancer, actress, and national spokesperson for the Opening Minds Through the Arts student achievement program

“With great and useful tips from beginning to end, this book will inspire workplaces to have more fun AND more success. I guarantee it!”George Zimmer, founder and CEO, Men’s Wearhouse

“This insightful work is a great primer for leaders who are looking to unleash creative potential and instill a sense of joy and playfulness in their organizations.” — Brian Walker, president and CEO, Herman Miller, Inc.

Animate your team and unleash their creative power . . . The Pixar Way

“Creativity doesn’t follow titles; it just comes from where it comes from.”Ed Catmull, Pixar cofounder, Pixar and Disney Animation Studios president

In movies from Toy Story to The Incredibles to WALL-E to Up, Pixar Studios continues to set new standards for commercial and critical achievement. Pixar is a place where collaboration sets the tone for “”artists and geeks” to work side by side in a spirit of mutual respect and trust. The key lies not just in who–writers, animators, directors, tech wizards, and others–makes Pixar outstanding, but in how Pixar creates the ultimate haven where creativity overflows.

In this eye-opening book, Bill Capodagli and Lynn Jackson, authors of The Disney Way, reveal how Pixar has reawakened the innovative spirit of Walt Disney. They explore how president Ed Catmull and chief creative officer John Lasseter and the rest of Pixar’s brain trust have built an organization on the simple philosophy that quality is the best businessplan. It makes no difference if you are making a movie that takes four years or serving a customer that takes four minutes, you have only one chance to deliver that magical, magnetic, enchanting experience for your customer.

In this concise, accessible book, Capodagli and Jackson offer examples of how it’s done–and explain what it takes to get your people to achieve greatness by unleashing their power to

  • Dream like a child . . . Have a vision, and be able to clearly communicate your objectives and goals.
  • Believe in your playmates . . . Hire creative people, trust in their skills and judgment, and inspire them to trust their colleagues.
  • Dare to jump in the water and make waves . . . Challenge the status quo. Encourage risktaking, but permit your people to fail, get back up, and try again.
  • Unleash your childlike potential . . . Focus on the details; make quality work your business’s highest priority.

Learn not only from Pixar but also from how other leading organizations–Google, Griffin Hospital, Men’s Wearhouse, OMA (Opening Minds Through the Arts) student achievement program, Nike, Target, and the Internet shoe giant Zappos–unshackle their people’s imaginations and do outrageously great things. And by motivating your team to Innovate the Pixar Way you, too, can discover the magic that will help your business stay ahead of the competition, attract the best talent, and fatten the bottom line.

In 1993, Bill Capodagli and Lynn Jackson cofounded Capodagli Jackson Consulting in West Olive, Michigan. They have helped scores of organizations revamp their customer service experiences and develop innovative products, and they also have developed performance strategies to impact organizational change using Walt Disney’s “Dream, Believe, Dare, Do” success credo. Bill Capodagli is the most requested keynote speaker on the creative cultures of both Disney and Pixar.

 

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