Risk management

 
  • Risk – How Men and Women Respond – Alexandra van Geen

    Risk in the background: How Men and Women Respond   Men and women respond differently to risk. Women are more risk averse than men, which has a significant impact on how they make decisions. Exploring this topic, Alexandra van Geen runs a series of experiments to evaluate under what conditions women and men are more or less willing to take risks. Specifically, she examines whether women and men are more likely to take risks when the financial reward is higher; if they are sensitive to the presence of other risks in the decision environment; or whether winning in the past makes them more likely to take risk in the future. She finds stark gender differences, including that men greatly increase risk taking after winning a lottery, while women do not. Investigating how, when and why men and women respond differently in risky environments can help close the gender gap in risk taking.

     
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  • Madhur Aggarwal on Having the Courage to Take Risks

    Madhur Aggarwal on Having the Courage to Take Risks   Madhur Aggarwal, VP, Head of Marketing Strategy, Office of CMO, SAP, recalls the importance of risk in his professional development. 

     
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  • My Vet sends me reminder letters … Why can’t my lawyer when it comes to my will? by Tom Deans

    My Vet sends me reminder letters … Why can’t my lawyer when it comes to my Will? Leading up to the release of my new book Willing Wisdom, I paid extra attention to the mail I received. Delivered to my home over the course of three months, were reminder letters from a host of personal service suppliers, including my accountant to file my taxes, my window cleaner, my lawn service, my insurance provider and my veterinarian.   What I didn’t receive, in fact what I’ve never received over the course of my 51 years on the planet, is a letter from my lawyer reminding me to up-date my will. Curious to know if I’m special (and not in a gifted way) I recently asked my audience – about 200 business owners from across North America assembled at a convention in La Jola California – how many of them had received an annual letter from their lawyer reminding them to up-date their will? Only seven hands shot up.   The results confirmed my suspicion that, like me, 193 people in that room had windows and pets receiving better regularly scheduled maintenance than their estate plans. So what’s the deal?   More alarming is that when questioned on the subject, half of that room acknowledged they didn’t have a will at all. When pressed further, 50% of those who did have a will confessed that it had been more than 5 years since it was last up-dated. When questioned even further almost the entire room confessed to having clean windows, healthy pets and weed free lawns.   Approximately 125 million North Americans over the age of 18 have no will and will eventually die intestate. The resulting financial and relational devastation to families is incalculable.   When I asked my veterinarian how she could be so organized and proactive in scheduling my pet’s annual check-up she tilted her head side ways (kind of like the way my dog Goblin does when I say “treats”) she blurted out – “auto-scheduler”. She might as well have added …“duhhh.”   Asking her for detail on this cutting edge 25-year-old technology she noted it was free — as in it doesn’t cost anything.   Below is the letter I received from my veterinarian word for word. ———— To: Tom Deans Annual physical examinations and a personal health consultation is integral to maintaining Goblin’s health. Please call our office to schedule an appointment. We’ve missed you and look forward to seeing you soon! Dufferin Veterinary Hospital ————   If you’re not receiving a letter from your lawyer reminding you to up-date your will, would you consider forwarding this article to your lawyer and help them get acquainted with the power of “auto-scheduling” and helping clients keep their estate plans up-to-date? Here’s a sample letter for them to consider sending annually to clients like you. ———— Dear client: A will is one of the most important legal documents for you and your family to consider. If one or more […]

     
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  • Managing Risk – Just Remember STARR

      Fortunately, there are a number of techniques for handling risks. The nature of a specific risk and the circumstances (extent of exposure, available resources, and so forth) often dictate which technique, or combination of techniques, is most appropriate. Basically, there are five methods for dealing with risk. It is easy to remember these by thinking of the acronym STARR.   Sharing—Sometimes, when a risk cannot be avoided and retention would involve too much exposure to loss, we may choose risk sharing as a means of handling the risk. By sharing risk with someone else, an individual also shares potential losses. That is, the individual’s own loss may not be as great if it occurs, but the individual may have to pay a portion of the losses experienced by others.   Transfer—Risk transfer means transferring the risk of loss to another party, usually an insurance company, that is more willing or able to bear the risk. Some non-insurance transfers of risk occur, such as when one agrees to assume the risk of another under the terms of a written contract.   Avoidance—As the name implies, this technique deals with risk by avoiding the risk in the first place. This usually means not undertaking an activity that could involve the chance of loss. For example, by never flying, one could eliminate the risk of being in an airplane crash.   Reduction—Sometimes, when risks cannot be avoided, they can be reduced. Risk reduction can work in one of two ways: it can reduce the chance that a particular loss will occur, or it can reduce the amount of a potential loss if it occurs. For example, installing a smoke alarm in a home would not lesson the possibility of fire, but it would reduce the risk of the loss from the fire.   Retention—Retention simply means doing nothing about the risk. In other words, people assume or retain the risk and, in effect, become self-insurers. For example, the insured would pay a smaller portion of the loss than the insurer, such as paying a deductible.  

     
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  • A Faith Based Economic Worldview

    Part One – The Ideal Economy To learn more, click here.    Part Two – What Goes Wrong To learn more, click here.   Part Three – Why It Goes Wrong To learn more, click here.    Part Four – Principled Reasoning To learn more, click here.    Part Five – Investment Decision Making To learn more, click here.    Part Six – Global Economy and Investment Markets To learn more, click here. 

     
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  • Which US President increased the debt?

     
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  • CNBC Squawk Box: Sen. Warren Leads Charge to Break Up Big Banks

    CNBC Squawk Box: Sen. Warren Leads Charge to Break Up Big Banks Senator John McCain and Elizabeth Warren are teaming up to break up the megabanks. Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren joined the Squawk Box team on Friday, July 12th to discuss this new bill.  

     
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  • Becoming Your Own Banker, The Infinite Banking Concept

    Becoming Your Own Banker, The Infinite Banking Concept

     
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Center for Family Conversations

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