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Nancy Kanwisher: A neural portrait of the human mind

Nancy Kanwisher: A neural portrait of the human mind

 

Brain imaging pioneer Nancy Kanwisher, who uses fMRI scans to see activity in brain regions (often her own), shares what she and her colleagues have learned: The brain is made up of both highly specialized components and general-purpose “machinery.” Another surprise: There’s so much left to learn.

Genius is our birthright and mediocrity is self-imposed | John Nosta

Genius is our birthright and mediocrity is self-imposed | John Nosta

 

We live in a cognitive tyranny that suppresses our true capacity for thought and experience. This fundamental misperception–how genius it the domaine of the few and fortunate–is simple incorrect.
 
Yet, we experience these transcendent moment of magic and fail to make the connection to genius–a connection that is endowed within us all.
 
John is a thinker cut from a contrarian cloth. He is a driving force in helping shape the role of technology, cognition and medicine in transforming the human existence.

 

Cognitive prescription for blind hindsight | Richard Chalkley

Cognitive prescription for blind hindsight | Richard Chalkley

 

We do not need to be blind to the source of our mistakes, but we are. As with glasses to correct myopia, Richard believes that there is a cognitive prescription for Blind Hindsight
 
Richard is now the Health and Safety Manager for the School of GeoSciences at the University of Edinburgh. He has looked after safety at the “sharp end” of research into infectious diseases and cancer in the public, private and charity sectors. He is a practitioner who strives to understand the human condition and why we get it wrong so often and so easily.

Why Talking To Little Kids Matters | Anne Fernald

Why Talking To Little Kids Matters | Anne Fernald

 

 

For babies, good conversation is nourishment for the brain. Dr. Anne Fernald is the director of the Language Learning Lab of the Stanford Psychology Department and one of the world’s leading experts in infant-directed speech. In her TEDxMonterey talk she explains how the quality of our interactions with infants and young children effects their brain development for life.Anne Fernald is the Josephine Knotts Knowles Professor of Human Biology at Stanford University. As director of the Language Learning Lab in the Department of Psychology, she conducts experimental studies of language processing by infants and young children, as well as observational studies of parent-infant interaction. Fernald and her research team have developed sensitive measures of the time course of infants’ understanding as they learn to interpret language from moment to moment. In longitudinal studies with English- and Spanish-learning children from advantaged and disadvantaged families, this research reveals the vital role of early language experience in strengthening speech processing efficiency, which in turn facilitates language learning. Fernald is also conducting research in West Africa, examining speech to children in relation to language learning in rural villages in Senegal. A central goal of this research is to help parents understand that they play a crucial role in supporting children’s language growth – providing their infant with early linguistic nutrition and language exercise.

Ray Kurzweil: Get ready for hybrid thinking

Ray Kurzweil: Get ready for hybrid thinking

 

Two hundred million years ago, our mammal ancestors developed a new brain feature: the neocortex. This stamp-sized piece of tissue (wrapped around a brain the size of a walnut) is the key to what humanity has become. Now, futurist Ray Kurzweil suggests, we should get ready for the next big leap in brain power, as we tap into the computing power in the cloud. 

Dan Gilbert: The psychology of your future self

Dan Gilbert: The psychology of your future self

 

“Human beings are works in progress that mistakenly think they’re finished.” Dan Gilbert shares recent research on a phenomenon he calls the “end of history illusion,” where we somehow imagine that the person we are right now is the person we’ll be for the rest of time. Hint: that’s not the case. 

The healing power of music: Robin Spielberg

The healing power of music: Robin Spielberg

 

Robin Spielberg, a renowned contemporary pianist and composer, tells a very personal story about the healing power of music. Her experiences inspired her to share how music makes an impact on our well-being and helps us through difficulties.

Cortney Warren: Honest Liars: The Psychology of Self-Deception

Cortney Warren: Honest Liars: The Psychology of Self-Deception

 

By providing content, resources, and connections, Dr. Cortney Warren’s goal is to support anyone who is brave enough to live a more conscious life. For when we are honest about who we really are, we have the opportunity to change.

 

Dr. Dean Ornish: Your genes are not your fate

Dr. Dean Ornish: Your genes are not your fate

 

Dr. Dean Ornish shares new research that shows how adopting healthy lifestyle habits can affect a person at a genetic level. For instance, he says, when you live healthier, eat better, exercise, and love more, your brain cells actually increase. And new findings show that a healthier lifestyle can turn off disease-provoking genes and turn on the good ones. 

Awe

Awe

 

Psychologist Nicholas Humphrey has proposed that our ability to awe was biologically selected for by evolution because it imbues our lives with sense of cosmic significance that has resulted in a species that works harder not just to survive but to flourish and thrive.