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Misdirection: Sam Fitton

Misdirection: Sam Fitton

An award winning magician and mentalist, Sam became interested in magic at an early age and quickly learnt the tricks of the trade. After obtaining a degree in Biology and serving 2 years as a police officer Sam decided to pursue his dream of performing magic. Sam now specialises in close up magic and mentalism and has entertained thousands of people across the UK.

 

Invisible Influences of the Mind: Oscar Gonzales

Invisible Influences of the Mind: Oscar Gonzales

Oscar Gonzales is a member of the Academy of Magical Arts at the Magic Castle and practices mentalism whenever he can. He is also a doctoral student in the Neuroscience Program at UC Riverside. Here he reveals his 17 year journey as a magician.

 

How Does the Brain Work?

How Does the Brain Work?

This episode of NOVA scienceNOW delves into some pretty heady stuff, examining magic and the brain, artificial intelligence, magnetic mind control, and the work of neuroscientist and synesthesia researcher David Eagleman. Can we really believe our own eyes? Will machines one day think like us? Can magnetic wands effectively control brain functions and treat depression? Explore this and more.

 

Intuition, magic, and meaning

Intuition, magic, and meaning

Dr. Laura King
Frederick A. Middlebush Professor of Psychological Sciences
University of Missouri

The psychological approach to meaning often relies on the notion that meaning is a conscious and intentional construction. King will present an alternative approach inspired by William James‘ “fringe of consciousness” notion, in which meaning emerges out of intuitive processes. Sense is not made but automatically sensed through meta-cognitive experience, heuristics, and affect. Research on magical thinking, pattern recognition, and semantic coherence judgments demonstrates the importance of individual differences in intuitive information processing and positive affect in the experience of meaning. Understanding the intuitive experience of meaning promises to illuminate the grand judgment of life’s meaningfulness, as well as domains of life in which we “just know” the validity of our feelings, including faith, morality, and sexuality.

Laura A. King, Frederick A. Middlebush Professor of Psychological Sciences at the University of Missouri, received her doctorate in personality psychology from the University of California, Davis in 1991. Author of more than 80 publications, King’s research focuses on psychological well being, meaning in life, intuition, motivation, narrative approaches, and folk theories of the “Good Life.” Her work has been funded by the National Institute on Mental Health and the Roger S. Williams Foundation. She won the Templeton Prize in 2001 for contributions to research on positive psychology and has been honored with numerous teaching awards as well. King currently serves as the editor of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: Personality Processes and Individual Differences.

J.K. Rowling’s Biography

J.K. Rowling‘s Biography

Part 1 of 4

Part 2 of 4

Part 3 of 4

Part 4 of 4

An informative biography about J.K. Rowling, the author of the Harry Potter series. Made by Biography and broadcasted by A&E, this biography was made between the publication of the fifth and sixth book.

 

JK Rowling: The fringe benefits of failure

At her Harvard commencement speech, “Harry Potter” author JK Rowling offers some powerful, heartening advice to dreamers and overachievers, including one hard-won lesson that she deems “worth more than any qualification I ever earned.”

JK Rowling penned the bestselling Harry Potter page-turners — a spellbinding, seven-installment fantasy of wizards, warlocks and decidedly British texture that brought her from rags to riches.

Why you should listen to her:

A single mother who battled poverty and depression as she struggled to launch her writing career, Joanne “JK” Rowling was to become perhaps the most famous contemporary fiction writer in the world, with her Harry Potter series of children’s books — a chronicle of the adventures of an adolescent wizard of the same name. The fourth volume of the series, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, was the fastest-selling book in history.

Since completing the series, Rowling has put her fortune toward philanthropic projects dealing with poverty, multiple sclerosis and other issues through her own Volant Charitable Trust.

“I’d give a lot to know how many teenagers (and preteens) texted this message in the days following the last book’s release: DON’T CALL ME TODAY I’M READING.”  Stephen King

 

Marco Tempest: The electric rise and fall of Nikola Tesla

Combining projection mapping and a pop-up book, Marco Tempest tells the visually arresting story of Nikola Tesla — called “the greatest geek who ever lived” — from his triumphant invention of alternating current to his penniless last days.

A magician and illusionist for the 21st century, Marco Tempest blends cutting-edge technology with the flair and showmanship of Houdini.

Why you should listen to him:

Marco Tempest’s imaginative combination of computer-generated imagery, quick-cut video and enthusiastic stage presence has earned him a place in the pantheon of great illusionists. At 22, the Swiss magician won the New York World Cup of Magic, launching him into international prominence. Tempest’s award-winning television series “The Virtual Magician” airs in dozens of countries worldwide, while his lively phonecam postings on YouTube, done without post-production and video-editing tricks to astonished people on the street, get millions of views (search on “virtualmagician”). His Vimeo channel showcases his artistic side–like his recent hypnotic series “levitation,” using a high-speed camera.