Home » Leadership

Category Archives: Leadership

Bill Barnett: Global Game Changers

Bill Barnett: Global Game Changers

 

Bill Barnett has spent his academic career studying Silicon Valley success stories, but he says some of the most innovative new business models are now being created in other parts of the world. From the Mexican entrepreneur who found a way to turn desert cactus into a bleach-free alternative to traditional detergents, to Alibaba’s Taobao in China and MercadoLibre in Latin America banking the unbankable, he says a new breed of global entrepreneur is unleashing a wave of innovation that could only have come from the places where their businesses were born. Barnett is Thomas M. Siebel professor of business leadership, strategy and organizations at Stanford Graduate School of Business. 

Roselinde Torres: What it takes to be a great leader

Roselinde Torres: What it takes to be a great leader

 

There are many leadership programs available today, from 1-day workshops to corporate training programs. But chances are, these won’t really help. In this clear, candid talk, Roselinde Torres describes 25 years observing truly great leaders at work, and shares the three simple but crucial questions would-be company chiefs need to ask to thrive in the future.

BCG’s Roselinde Torres studies what makes great leaders tick — and figures out how to teach others the same skills.

 

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO HER?

 

Roselinde Torres is a senior partner and managing director at the consulting firm, BCG. A senior leader in the firm’s “people and organization” practice area, she is also the company’s resident expert on leadership, a topic she has studied her entire career.

 

Questions she likes to ask include, “what innovative methods can help prepare the next generation of leaders?” and “how do we enable leaders to unlearn past modes and habits of success?”

 

Prior to joining BCG in 2006, Roselinde was a senior partner at Mercer Delta Consulting, while she has also led internal consulting teams at Johnson & Johnson and Connecticut Mutual Life. She speaks frequently about organizational transformation and leadership; her work and thinking have been featured in publications such as BusinessWeek and The Economist.

 

“The best leadership development doesn’t happen by just going off to a course or a seminar … The best leadership development happens when people are learning in the context of their own strategic, economic agenda, with the actual people that they are going to influence and lead.” Roselinde Torres 

Business Growth Strategies: Double Your Customer Base Overnight by Peter Ireland

Entrepreneurs and Small Business Owners Can Use Acquisitions to Double or Triple Their Customer Base Overnight

 

Oftentimes it’s easier to significantly increase your customer base through the acquisition of competitors than it is with the more commonly used marketing route.  Anyone with at least a modicum of business experience appreciates just how challenging it is for an established business to grow its customer base by 10% per annum if it relies solely on marketing efforts.  On the other hand, the acquisition of a competitor can double, triple, or quadruple your customer base at deal closing.

business growth strategies

 Business Growth Strategies

 

 

What many business owners don’t realize is that it can be cheaper as well faster to go with the acquisitions growth strategy. To illustrate this, let’s take a look at cases where this was capitalized on from the recent past.  Specifically, let’s look at businesses which utilized subscriber revenue models such as cable-TV and Internet service providers.  If you owned a small system in either industry, you were faced with a choice of growth through marketing or acquisitions. Now suppose that you had set as your goal a doubling of your subscriber base in five year’s time. We will assume that this target is extrapolated from your growth rates over the last three years. An analysis of your customer acquisition costs needed to double your sales over three years may show that a marketing based strategy’s costs will exceed those of an acquisition strategy.  Morever, the acquisitions route will achieve your goal by doubling the subscriber base as soon as the deal is finalized.

 

Are you still not convinced that an acquisitions-base growth strategy is the way to go? Okay, let me throw in another reason to seriously consider this option: lower risk. Yes, if you know your business and industry and decide to buy-out a competitor your risk can be reduced because you are taking control of an asset that you understand and that has passed your due diligence. Imagine for a moment that you own and operate a pizza parlor and are looking for ways to expand. One day a marketing consultant calls on you to pitch a new marketing strategy which he promises will double your sales over three years–but at a substantial cost. The week after you are notified by a friend that your competitor down the street is for sale. Acquisition of this pizza joint would instantly double your revenue. You compare the prices of the two options and discover that they are only about 15% apart.

 

Which is the lower risk option? In most cases, the acquisition of an add-on profit center for your business. After all, you already know to successfully operate such a business and the lenders will trust you more than someone needing a loan to attempt some unproven growth strategy.

 

Business Growth via Acquisitions

 

Back in the 1990s, there was a great deal of M&A activity in the printing industry.  One large printer embarked on an acquisitions strategy to expand the market for its three core services: document scanning, fast high-volume printing, and distribution of legal documents, such as proxy statements and collections letters.  As a result, the company focused on acquiring small printers which offered only one of these three services. After the acquisition, the absorbed company would be able to offer its customers the expanded range of services made possible by the acquirer.  This, in turn, enabled them to win over larger local accounts that they could not have otherwise serviced before.

 

This is a typical example of what drives a company to employ an acquisitions strategy.

 

The Tycoon Playbook covers the details of designing a successful M&A strategy for small businesses and entrepreneurial companies.

3 Key Leadership Styles That Create Personal Success

3 Key Leadership Styles That Create Personal Success

 

brian tracy

Do you know what leadership styles are the best for creating success? Watch this video and you’ll learn the three steps to improve your leadership skills immediately. 

There is no leadership without courage: Narayana Murthy

There is no leadership without courage: Narayana Murthy

 

Infosys founder and chairman Narayana Murthy spoke about the skillset that a leadership needed to possess and how integral a part courage played in leadership.  

Needs: What’s Real & What’s Aspirational by Dr. Bill DeMarco

Dr. Bill DeMarco

Values, History and Folklore, are the core elements of culture at a point in time.  They are our link to our personal past…handed down to us by all those who came before us. This is true of our ethnic culture, our tribal culture, our national culture, our religious culture, and our personal culture, to name just a few.   Since we are the link to our past, we are caretakers of something precious as we hand it down to future generations.  Since culture is a living thing, it does change over time, but ever so slowly.  Just think about it; there is some behavioral mannerism, belief, perception that you got from an ancestor who lived a hundred or many hundreds of years ago.  To use a modern expression, “You are Connected”.  There really is nothing new under the sun, other than our choice of what we will do with our cultural inheritance.  Since culture is a living phenomenon, we will make our choices and then pass the culture on to future generations, along with our contributions.  That is the way it is and that is the way it will continue to be.

Image 1: DeMarco Culture Model

© 2003 Dr. Bill DeMarco

All of this gets us back to our discussion of Values.   I described Values as “the unique blend of perceived NeedsBeliefs, and Attitudes that live in the behaviour of most members of a society”.   Needs are one of three segments of the Values element of my Culture Model (Image 1).  Needs, along with Beliefs and Attitudes, taken separately and in their interaction, make up our unique Values proposition.

Within a cultural context, Needs are similar to what Abraham Maslow (Image 2) describes as the fundamental requirements for survival, safety and belonging. They have everything to do with the necessities of the human condition, and nothing to do with a luxury car in the garage, a kitchen with granite counter tops, and two weeks in Saint Kitts! The latter, at the extreme end, has more to do with our image of “Esteem”.

 

 

Image 2: Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

 

 

Maslow’s work linked Needs to motivation.  While his groundbreaking work is still challenged by some, I find his conclusions compelling.  Satisfying individual and group needs at the three basic levels in the above image greatly facilitates our ability to incorporate our Beliefs into our Values system. Remember I wrote earlier that if we want to know what our real values are, look at our behaviour and not our words.  There is a strong link between our ability to survive and our ability to put our Beliefs into action.

 

Here is a simple exercise that can help identify our real personal needs. It involves reading and reflecting on the bottom three categories of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs (Image 2).  Then make a list of what those Needs look like in your life.  Put that under a category labeled “Needs”.  Everything else that comes to mind, put under a category labeled “Wants”.  There is nothing wrong with “Wants”…Just don’t confuse the two!

 

Meaningful reflections!

 

Dr. Bill DeMarco

 

“Innate” – One Word That Changes Everything, Baron A Rohbock

Are leaders born or made? I have the answer! Baron A Rohbock

 

baron a rohbock

Baron graduated with honors in Business Administration and Leadership. With a passion for training and working with teams, he entered the Learning and Development field as Director of Training for Taylor Hartman, author of The People Code (previously published as The Color Code).
With a wide breadth of knowledge in leadership, Baron returned to the training industry to combine first hand management and executive leadership experience with a passion for working with people to shape results while revealing individual and collective talent. In 2011 he started Core MotivAction, an innovative brilliant training company dedicated to people and team development.

What if… We knew the difference between leadership and management?

What if… We knew the difference between leadership and management?

 

leadership and management

Presenter: Tony Mortensen, Director of the Executive Development Programmes

 

· What is strategic leadership?
· What is effective management?
· Do organisations know the difference?
· What is best for achieving sustainable growth?

 

The last decade has seen an exponential increase in the number of courses offered in the area of organisational leadership, with almost every major business school worldwide now offering specialised training in this area. Do organisations truly understand the key difference between leadership and management? Do they understand what is needed in their organisation to achieve efficiency, profitability and sustainable growth? If we employ skilled people to undertake the different tasks in an organisation do we really need to manage those people or are we better off allowing them to do what we employed them to do. The flip side of this is that if we do not manage these people effectively then the organisation runs the risk of becoming less efficient and effective at providing society with the desired outcomes.
At odds with both these ideas is the fact that New Zealand is now seen as one of the hardest working countries in the OECD, yet our productivity continues to fall. Therefore, are organisations getting the best from their human resource or are we as a society destined to be out-performed?
Tony has over 18 years’ experience in accounting, management and education and is now responsible for executive training through the Master of Business Administration (MBA), Postgraduate Certificate in Strategic Leadership, Master of Business Management (MBM), Master of Professional Accounting (MPA) and Executive Education (short courses).

 

H. Rafael Chacón- What My Genes Tell Me

H. Rafael Chacón- What My Genes Tell Me

[youtube=

 

Art Historian H. Rafael Chacón talks about how an academic exercise turned into a personal journey when he had his DNA sequenced by the National Geographic Geno 2.0 project. Rafael is professor of Art History and Criticism in the School of Art at the University of Montana. A specialist on renaissance and baroque art, Rafael teaches a range of topical courses on the history of art and art criticism. His academic interests lie in the ways societies articulate their most profound values through art; in particular he researches, lectures and writes about architectural history and historic preservation.

 

When life throws you a curve-ball… David Ecker

When life throws you a curve-ball… David Ecker

[youtube=

 

When life throws you a curve-ball, either you have to duck, or learn to hit curve balls

David Ecker is a Stony Brook graduate who previously served as the Interim Director/Manager of Client Support for over 10 years and led the Project 50 Managed Output initiative. He focuses on strategic planning, partnering with researchers and developing best practices for the research community.