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The Four Superpowers of the Internet | Dave Moskovitz

The Four Superpowers of the Internet | Dave Moskovitz

 

 

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO DAVE MOSKOVITZ?

 

Exploring how we all have access and can embody the superpowers which the internet allows us to have. What will you do with your powers?
 
Dave is a professional director and startup investor. He’s invested in a number of New Zealand startups that are now performing on the world stage, and is on the InternetNZ and Open Polytechnic Councils. His sweet spot is the busy intersection between technology, commerce, and making the world a better place.
 
Dave was born in California, wrote his first computer program at age 11, joined the nascent IT industry, and then immigrated to New Zealand in 1982. After starting a Ph.D in Applied Linguistics studying the phonology of New Zealand Sign Language, he cofounded one of Wellington’s early Internet startups in 1995 which later sold to a multinational. He still loves coding.
 
Dave is on the national leadership team at Startup Weekend and Startup New Zealand, and has helped many entrepreneurs refine their ideas, find the right cofounders and team members, secure investment, enter global markets, and scale internationally.

Breaking Outside of Your Friends List | Alan Schaaf

Breaking Outside of Your Friends List | Alan Schaaf

 

The power of online communities and how anonymous groups of people can be a source of good in this world.
 

Alan Schaaf is the founder and CEO of the website Imgur.com, which allows you to upload and share images with the world. He’s been programming professionally since he was 14, and has started two successful bootstrapped companies through his keen eye for design and user experience.
 
He created Imgur in 2009, and since then it’s grown into an online community where millions of people express their ideas and opinions through images. By the end of Alan’s talk, you will learn about the future of communities, how they’re changing the world, and what that means for you.

When Genius and Insanity Hold Hands | Ondi Timoner

When Genius and Insanity Hold Hands | Ondi Timoner

 

The internet is a horror film starring all of us — will we step out of line and create something different? Ondi Timoner (two-time Sundance Grand Jury Prize winner) explores what happens when genius and insanity hold hands to create the impossible. In the future, 40% of jobs may be eliminated by technology — but were you working on your dream anyway?
 
Ondi Timoner has the rare distinction of winning the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival twice, for “Dig!” (2004) and “We Live in Public” (2009). She currently produces and hosts the only documentary talk show in the world, BYOD (Bring Your Own Doc), which has more than 150 episodes, and has created an online network for entrepreneurs, innovators and artists documenting the top thought-leaders and doers who use technology to disrupt old paradigms, called A Total Disruption.
 
Timoner has also directed numerous commercials for such clients as Ford, State Farm, the Clinton Foundation and many music videos for artists including Lucinda Williams, The Jonas Brothers, The Vines, OK Go and Fastball, which garnered her a Grammy nomination in 1998. She is a fellow of the Sundance Institute and the Tribeca All-Access Program, and has been a member of the Director’s Guild of America since 2006.

Eric Schmidt & Jared Cohen: The Impact of Internet and Technology

Eric Schmidt & Jared Cohen: The Impact of Internet and Technology

 

Moderated by Dr. Condoleezza Rice, Eric Schmidt, Executive Chairman of Google and Jared Cohen, Director of Google Ideas discuss how technology will change privacy and security, war and intervention, diplomacy, and terrorism. “When you empower people with tools like technology, democracy flourishes,” said Schmidt.For the developing world, the arrival of the smartphone and access to the Internet is life-changing. For example, approximately one billion people in China are going to gain online access in a decade. Schmidt believes technology can empower people, solve literacy issues, and improve governments around the world.

Marco Annunziata: Welcome to the age of the industrial internet

Marco Annunziata: Welcome to the age of the industrial internet

marco annunziata

 

Everyone’s talking about the “Internet of Things,” but what exactly does that mean for our future? In this thoughtful talk, economist Marco Annunziata looks at how technology is transforming the industrial sector, creating machines that can see, feel, sense and react — so they can be operated far more efficiently. Think: airplane parts that send an alert when they need to be serviced, or wind turbines that communicate with one another to generate more electricity. It’s a future with exciting implications for us all.

The Chief Economist at General Electric, Marco Annunziata is a financial virtuoso with a passion for technology. 

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO HIM?

 

Marco Annunziata is the Chief Economist of General Electric, responsible for the global economic analysis that guides GE’s business strategy. A member of the European Central Bank’s Shadow Council and of the European Council of Economists, Annunziata has been featured on Bloomberg, CNBC, and in The Financial Times and The Wall Street Journal.

 

Annunziata arrived at GE in 2011 with a long track record in the financial sector, previously working at Unicredit, Deutsche Bank and the International Monetary Fund, where he researched emerging markets and the Eurozone. Annunziata confesses that he is “childishly proud” of his first book, The Economics of the Financial Crisis (Palgrave MacMillan, 2011). The book traces the global fiscal crisis back to a failure of common sense, in which so many of us played a part, and offers guidance for learning the right lessons from the outcomes.

 

“Machines increasingly communicate among themselves and with people. Mobile devices allow round-the-clock interconnectivity. Computers crunch terabytes of data. Such innovations have convinced economists from GE’s Marco Annunziata to Erik Brynjolfsson of MIT that the stage is set for a wave of productivity gains to rival the 10-year Internet boom that began in 1995.” Bloomberg 

The future of search: Marcus Tandler – Lugen Family Office

The future of search: Marcus Tandler – Lugen Family Office

 

 

Mikko Hypponen: How the NSA betrayed the world’s trust — time to act

Mikko Hypponen: How the NSA betrayed the world’s trust — time to act

Recent events have highlighted, underlined and bolded the fact that the United States is performing blanket surveillance on any foreigner whose data passes through an American entity — whether they are suspected of wrongdoing or not. This means that, essentially, every international user of the internet is being watched, says Mikko Hypponen. An important rant, wrapped with a plea: to find alternative solutions to using American companies for the world’s information needs.

As computer access expands, Mikko Hypponen asks: What’s the next killer virus, and will the world be able to cope with it? And also: How can we protect digital privacy in the age of government surveillance?

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO HIM?

The chief research officer at F-Secure Corporation in Finland, Mikko Hypponen has led his team through some of the largest computer virus outbreaks in history. His team took down the world-wide network used by the Sobig.F worm. He was the first to warn the world about the Sasser outbreak, and he has done classified briefings on the operation of the Stuxnet worm — a hugely complex worm designed to sabotage Iranian nuclear enrichment facilities.

As a few hundred million more Internet users join the web from India and China and elsewhere, and as governments and corporations become more sophisticated at using viruses as weapons, Hypponen asks, what’s next? Who will be at the front defending the world’s networks from malicious software? He says: “It’s more than unsettling to realize there are large companies out there developing backdoors, exploits and trojans.”

Even more unsettling: revelations this year that the United States’ NSA is conducting widespread digital surveillance of both US citizens and anyone whose data passes through a US entity, and that it has actively sabotaged encryption algorithms. Hypponen has become one of the most outspoken critics of the agency’s programs and asks us all: Why are we so willing to hand over digital privacy?

 

Abha Dawesar: Life in the “digital now”

Abha Dawesar: Life in the “digital now”

One year ago, Abha Dawesar was living in blacked-out Manhattan post-Sandy, scrounging for power to connect. As a novelist, she was struck by this metaphor: Have our lives now become fixated on the drive to digitally connect, while we miss out on what’s real?

Abha Dawesar writes to make sense of the world — herself included

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO HER?

Abha Dawesar began her writing career as an attempt to understand herself — at age 7. It’s a goal that remains at the center of her work: Sensorium, her most recent novel,explores the nature of time, self, and uncertainty, using Hindu mythology and modern science as prisms. “At a very basic level, writing was always my way of apprehending the world,” she has said.

Dawesar moved from India to the United States to study at Harvard, and Delhi appears at the center of her novels Family Values and Babyji. But the oversimplified genres of immigrant fiction or ethnic fiction do not appeal to her. “Those looking for a constant South Asian theme or Diaspora theme or immigrant theme will just be disappointed in the long run from my work,” she has said. “The only label I can put up with is that of a writer. And my ideas come from everywhere.”

 

Society minds, technology doesn´t: Yvonne Rogers

Society minds, technology doesn´t: Yvonne Rogers

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Professor of Interaction Design and director of UCLIC at UCL. Her research interests are in the areas of ubiquitous computing, interaction design and human-computer interaction.

In her talk, Yvonne shows us the different effects technology has on us. She mentions various (negative) examples of too much smartphone usage and she shows us how to use technology and information wisely so that in the end we can use it to have more time and to be happier. (and not: being a slave of technology)

The Truth Needs Better Marketing: Eli Pariser

The Truth Needs Better Marketing: Eli Pariser

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