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The power of conversations | Zeenat Rahman

The power of conversations | Zeenat Rahman

 

We’re more than just the labels we wear and the titles that we have. About the impact of different types of conversation. On how conversation can change yourself, young people and diplomacy.
 
Zeenat Rahman works as U.S. Secretary of State, John Kerry’s Special Adviser on Global Youth Issues. Her focus has been to incorporate youth voices into critical debates that help shape global affairs. She collaborates with over 50 Youth Councils scattered all over the globe with achieve a positive development for the world’s youth. She speaks about the importance of youth leadership in promoting civic engagement and harmony between diverse communities. During Zeenat Rahman career, she has been active to promote leadership and interfaith dialogue in down-town Chicago.

The Family Compass by Jerry Nuerge

The Family Compass by Jerry Nuerge

 

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Families often lack a compass for navigating through potential distractions. Most high net worth people believe that if they have signed all their trust documents and wills, they have taken care of their future. After all, their attorneys and CPAs have assured them that the maximum amount of financial assets will be transferred to their spouse and then to their children with as little loss to the tax man as possible. Unfortunately, research shows that only ten percent of financial assets make it to the fourth generation.

 

A family’s values are just as important as those of a corporation, but they receive far less attention. I have found it more beneficial to families to focus on three often ignored components that have the potential to extend a legacy indefinitely:

 

1) What are your values?

 

2) What virtues will we pursue?

 

3) What do we want our family story to be?

 

Collectively, these are family brand equity, the core of a family’s culture. The values define the family, the virtues build the family, and the story describes the family.

 

 

VALUES

Rather than elevate whatever human values are currently in vogue in our culture, we identify our family’s values based on the evidence of our calendar and pocketbook. 

 

 

VIRTUES

Virtues are frequently underestimated in importance. Aristotle argued that substantial happiness and human flourishing could be grasped only through the virtues. King Solomon stated it this way: “My son, do not forget my teaching, but keep my commands in your heart, for they will prolong your life many years and bring you peace and prosperity. Let love and faithfulness never leave you.” (Proverbs 3:1-3)
 
The battle of morality is not so much about knowing what is right as it is doing what is right. 

 

 

STORY

The family story is a crucial component. Think of the family story as an ongoing stream of past, present, and future stories of family members woven together. These stories, infused with the family’s values and virtues, provide a sense of identity as well as motivation to not be the generation that weakens the heritage.

 

 

Imagine the priceless joy when family brand equity is the focal point of our transfers to the next generation! These assets empower families to live intentionally productive lives for multiple generations.

 

 

 

To learn more about the Center for Family Conversations and the new book, Unheritage, click here.

 

 

 

 

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO JERRY?

 

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Jerry Nuerge is founder and owner of the Financial Independence Group. He is also the creator of the Wealth Integration and Transfer System™, the Generation Connection Process™, as well as the Revenue Retrieval System™. Jerry holds a BBA and MBA degree, holds the Chartered Advisor in Philanthropy (CAP), is a Chartered Life Underwriter (CLU), a Chartered Financial Consultant (ChFC), a Certified Family Wealth Counselor (CFWC), and a Registered Investment Advisor (RIA). He is a lifetime member of the Million Dollar Round Table (MDRT), and has qualified for its “Top of the Table.” He also belongs to the National Estate Planning Council, the Society of Financial Service Professionals, the National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors (NAIFA), and is a past-president of the local chapters of these organizations.

 

 

Jerry is a member of Kingdom Advisors (KA) and a charter member of the Int’l Association of Advisors in Philanthropy (AiP), which he served as president in 2009.

 

 

Jerry has been married to his wife, Sharon, since 1967, and has three children and eight grandchildren, all living in the Fort Wayne, IN area.

 

 

Co-author of Family Wealth Counseling: Getting to the Heart of the Matter and author of The Priceless Gift, Jerry is active as a consultant and national speaker.

The Power of Yes and the Wisdom of No – Jose Gerald Suarez

The Power of Yes and the Wisdom of No: Jose Gerald Suarez

 

In this empowering talk, Dr. Suarez explores the importance of the value of attainment-based thinking. He encourages his audience to focus on saying “yes” what they do want, rather than focusing on saying “no” to what they don’t want, arguing that it’s the only way to move forward. What do you want to say “yes” to?

How Words Create Worlds – Sebastien Christian

How Words Create Worlds: Sebastien Christian

 

If we can’t agree on the simple things, how can we possibly agree on complicated ones like democracy, rights, or religion? As entrepreneurial physicist, speech and language pathologist, and semanticist Sebastien Christian explains, all we have to do is destroy a table – or at least our definition of one.

Andrew Solomon: How the worst moments in our lives make us who we are

Andrew Solomon: How the worst moments in our lives make us who we are

 

Writer Andrew Solomon has spent his career telling stories of the hardships of others. Now he turns inward, bringing us into a childhood of struggle, while also spinning tales of the courageous people he’s met in the years since. In a moving, heartfelt and at times downright funny talk, Solomon gives a powerful call to action to forge meaning from our biggest struggles.

 

The Magic of Words: What We Speak Is What We Create: Andrew Bennett

The Magic of Words: What We Speak Is What We Create: Andrew Bennett

 

Andrew Bennett is a Transformational Magician. He began his career as Ross Perot’s personal assistant and for over three decades he has been a leadership consultant and coach to organizations of all shapes and sizes around the world. A member of The Magic Circle, the oldest and most prestigious society of magicians in the world, Andrew uses magic to enable leaders to simplify and accelerate organizational transformation.

 

The Most Dangerous Four-Letter Word: Dick Simon

The Most Dangerous Four-Letter Word: Dick Simon

 

The word THEM has the destructive power to enslave entire continents, wage wars, and commit genocides. THEM impacts personal relationships as well as geopolitical conflicts. This talk will inspire you to get past THEM and recognize that the ‘other’ has its own narrative, history, and perspective. With this insight, conflicts are resolvable and our human interactions are richer and more nuanced.

Dick Simon is a serial entrepreneur, passionate photographer and has spent the past twelve years traveling throughout conflict regions of the world, including North Korea, Iran, Syria, Israel/Palestine, Cuba and others, learning about and combating the most dangerous four-letter word in the English language, THEM. 

 

 

Needs: What’s Real & What’s Aspirational by Dr. Bill DeMarco

Dr. Bill DeMarco

Values, History and Folklore, are the core elements of culture at a point in time.  They are our link to our personal past…handed down to us by all those who came before us. This is true of our ethnic culture, our tribal culture, our national culture, our religious culture, and our personal culture, to name just a few.   Since we are the link to our past, we are caretakers of something precious as we hand it down to future generations.  Since culture is a living thing, it does change over time, but ever so slowly.  Just think about it; there is some behavioral mannerism, belief, perception that you got from an ancestor who lived a hundred or many hundreds of years ago.  To use a modern expression, “You are Connected”.  There really is nothing new under the sun, other than our choice of what we will do with our cultural inheritance.  Since culture is a living phenomenon, we will make our choices and then pass the culture on to future generations, along with our contributions.  That is the way it is and that is the way it will continue to be.

Image 1: DeMarco Culture Model

© 2003 Dr. Bill DeMarco

All of this gets us back to our discussion of Values.   I described Values as “the unique blend of perceived NeedsBeliefs, and Attitudes that live in the behaviour of most members of a society”.   Needs are one of three segments of the Values element of my Culture Model (Image 1).  Needs, along with Beliefs and Attitudes, taken separately and in their interaction, make up our unique Values proposition.

Within a cultural context, Needs are similar to what Abraham Maslow (Image 2) describes as the fundamental requirements for survival, safety and belonging. They have everything to do with the necessities of the human condition, and nothing to do with a luxury car in the garage, a kitchen with granite counter tops, and two weeks in Saint Kitts! The latter, at the extreme end, has more to do with our image of “Esteem”.

 

 

Image 2: Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

 

 

Maslow’s work linked Needs to motivation.  While his groundbreaking work is still challenged by some, I find his conclusions compelling.  Satisfying individual and group needs at the three basic levels in the above image greatly facilitates our ability to incorporate our Beliefs into our Values system. Remember I wrote earlier that if we want to know what our real values are, look at our behaviour and not our words.  There is a strong link between our ability to survive and our ability to put our Beliefs into action.

 

Here is a simple exercise that can help identify our real personal needs. It involves reading and reflecting on the bottom three categories of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs (Image 2).  Then make a list of what those Needs look like in your life.  Put that under a category labeled “Needs”.  Everything else that comes to mind, put under a category labeled “Wants”.  There is nothing wrong with “Wants”…Just don’t confuse the two!

 

Meaningful reflections!

 

Dr. Bill DeMarco

 

The power of words: Grace Taylor – Lugen Family Office

The power of words: Grace Taylor – Lugen Family Office

 

the power of words

 

The virtues of gossip: Richard Weiner

The virtues of gossip: Richard Weiner – Lugen Family Office

 

 

Richard Weiner is the author of 23 books, including Webster’s New World Dictionary of Media and Communications, found in major libraries around the world, and Professional’s Guide to Public Relations Services, a textbook at many colleges.