Globalization

 
  • 10 billion people for dinner | Nina Fedoroff

    10 billion people for dinner | Nina Fedoroff   The world population is estimated to reach 10 billion in the near future. How can we feed so many with our existing resources? Nina Fedoroff gives an overview of what’s needed, highlighting the important role that science has played in developing food and agriculture throughout human history and the solutions it could offer.   Nina Fedoroff’s research interests range from the biochemistry of microRNA processing and transposition to the design of greenhouses for hot, humid environments, although she is best known for her pioneering work on plant transposons. A PhD from Rockefeller University, she is an Evan Pugh Professor at Pennsylvania State University. A 2006 National Medal of Science laureate, she served as Science and Technology Adviser to the US Secretary of State and to USAID’s administrator.

     
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  • The History of our Universe by Big History Project

    Introduction to Thresholds of Increasing Complexity | Big History Project       Threshold 1: The Big Bang | Big History Project       Threshold 2: The Stars Light Up | Big History Project       Crash Course Big History: Stars & Galaxies       Threshold 3: New Chemical Elements | Big History Project       The Periodic Table: Crash Course Chemistry       Threshold 4: Earth & Solar System | Big History Project       Crash Course Big History: The Solar System & the Earth       What Was The Young Earth Like? | Big History Project       Threshold 5: Life on Earth Video | Big History Project       Mini Thresholds Of Life | Big History Project       Crash Course Big History: The Origin of Life       How We Proved An Asteroid Wiped Out The Dinosaurs from The Big History Project       Threshold 6: Humans and Collective Learning | Big History Project       Crash Course Big History: Human Evolution       Migrations and Technological Creativity | Big History Project       Threshold 7: Agriculture | Big History Project       Where and Why Did the First Cities and States Appear? | Big History Project       Why Did Civilizations Expand? | Big History Project       How Did the World Become Interconnected? | Big History Project       Threshold 8: The Modern Revolution | Big History Project       Coal, Steam, and The Industrial Revolution: Crash Course World History       How Did Change Accelerate? | Big History Project    

     
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  • David Christian: The history of our world in 18 minutes

    David Christian: The history of our world in 18 minutes   Backed by stunning illustrations, David Christian narrates a complete history of the universe, from the Big Bang to the Internet, in a riveting 18 minutes. This is “Big History”: an enlightening, wide-angle look at complexity, life and humanity, set against our slim share of the cosmic timeline.

     
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  • Which country does the most good for the world? – Simon Anholt

    Which country does the most good for the world? – Simon Anholt   It’s an unexpected side effect of globalization: problems that once would have stayed local—say, a bank lending out too much money—now have consequences worldwide. But still, countries operate independently, as if alone on the planet. Policy advisor Simon Anholt has dreamed up an unusual scale to get governments thinking outwardly: The Good Country Index. In a riveting and funny talk, he answers the question, “Which country does the most good?” The answer may surprise you (especially if you live in the US or China). 

     
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  • Going Local Before Going Global

    Going Local Before Going Global   Can penetrating domestic rural markets help local firms in China capture revenues from foreign competitors and also enter markets abroad? 

     
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  • IMF Chief Christine Lagarde expresses optimism about the global economy

    IMF Chief Christine Lagarde at Stanford’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies   Christine Lagarde, head of the IMF, expresses optimism about the global economy during a talk at Stanford on Feb. 25, 2014. Credit: Roger Winkelman 

     
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  • The Future of Globalization and It’s Impact On Our World

    The Future of Globalization and It’s Impact On Our World Presentation of Ekaterinburg Expo 2020 theme “The Global Mind: The Future of Globalization and It’s Impact On Our World”

     
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  • Andrew McAfee: What will future jobs look like?

    Andrew McAfee: What will future jobs look like? Economist Andrew McAfee suggests that, yes, probably, droids will take our jobs — or at least the kinds of jobs we know now. In this far-seeing talk, he thinks through what future jobs might look like, and how to educate coming generations to hold them. Andrew McAfee studies how information technology affects businesses and society. WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO HIM? Andrew McAfee studies the ways that information technology (IT) affects businesses, business as a whole, and the larger society. His research investigates how IT changes the way companies perform, organize themselves and compete. At a higher level, his work also investigates how computerization affects competition, society, the economy and the workforce. He’s a principal research scientist at the Center for Digital Business at the MIT Sloan School of Management. His books include Enterprise 2.0 and Race Against the Machine (with Erik Brynjolfsson).

     
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