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The Idea of Family Wealth

The Idea of Family Wealth

 

This topic is absolutely foreign to the middle class, and even many high income earners. I myself have never experienced it;, my education comes directly from speaking with wealthy individuals and observing some of the richest families in history.
The Idea of Family Wealth.

Preparing Heirs by Bill High

Preparing Heirs by Bill High

 

Young family

 

What is it about our kids that prompt such great emotion – from elation to depression? Certainly, there is no greater joy than to see our children flourish and no greater agony than to see them wander from our values and our beliefs.

 

Irony: neglecting the “soft” side

 

The greatest irony in family estate planning: spending countless hours on the “hard” side of assets while giving lip service to the “soft” side of people development. 

 

The tendency in estate planning is to prepare legal documents that transfer financial wealth without preparing our children for true legacy. What does preparing our children for true legacy mean?

 

Preparing children for true legacy

 

Life is often a blur in the child-raising years. In the same timeframe that we are raising kids, we are building our careers. And frankly, some of us tend to do a better job of building financial wealth than “family wealth.” Much of what our children learn is left to chance: whatever they observe along the way.

 

When things finally settle down a bit, the children are graduated, off to college, or even absorbed with starting their own careers and families. 

 

What is family wealth?

 

In his book, Family Wealth, James Hughes discusses the importance of human capital that includes the following outcomes – ideally for all family members:

 

  • They are thriving
  • They have a strong sense of purpose, passion, and calling
  • They have a strong sense of work ethic and character qualities like integrity, honesty, and compassion
  • They have interpersonal relationships both within the family and externally
  • They understand that life does not revolve around them but that instead they are part of a greater whole, a greater cause
  • They have spiritual grounding
  • They are generous.

 

These are big ideas, which go way beyond transferring financial capital. They go to transferring intellectual capital, social capital, emotional capital, and spiritual capital as well.

 

Good relationships require intentionality

 

It’s time spent with children with intentionality – making sure they understand our story and that we understand theirs. It is time spent repairing relational damage that is unintentional but inevitable. It is making sure they are healthy, thriving, and feeling fulfilled. 

 

Giving together creates unity

 

One of the best tools I’ve found to bring families together is giving together. Structurally, that may take the form of creating a foundation or a donor advised fund. But practically, it simply means doing some giving together.

 

Giving is the great equalizer. Suffice it to say that giving prompts conversations that everyone can participate in regardless of age or experience.

 

Investing in legacy

 

So what do you want when you think about your heirs – great joy or great agony? It will take great effort to achieve the former. It must go beyond estate documents. Estate documents are a part, but they really should be guided with the influence of all forms of capital – intellectual, social, emotional, spiritual, and financial.

 

To learn more about the Center for Family Conversations and the new book, Unheritage, click here.

 

 

 

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO BILL?

 

Kansas-City-MO-Insurance-Defense-High-832968

 

William F. High is the Chief Executive Officer of National Christian Foundation Heartland.

 

He works with families, individual givers, and financial advisors to help facilitate God’s call to generosity. Much of that work includes advising on issues of income tax planning, business sale planning, and estate planning. Bill is a visionary leader energized by people and ideas. He loves to learn, innovate, and strategize on how new ideas or new approaches to current methods might escalate growth. As a former lawyer, the law taught him how to ask great questions to find the truth.

 

Bill is also the founder of iDonate.com, a fundraising software company serving the nonprofit community. iDonate.com provides an online marketing solution for nonprofits to market and receive gifts of all kinds, including cash, text, credit card, and non-cash gifts. Bill is also the President of Generous Life, a legacy consulting organization with the aim of making generosity generational. A published author and conference speaker, he is the general editor of Grants and More for Christian Ministries, and a contributing author to Why the Conservative Mind Matters. He recently authored Stories of the Generous Life and is currently working on the follow up to that book.

 

Bill has been married to his wife, Brooke, for 25 years. They have four children: Ashley, Jessica, Nathan, and Joseph.

 

 

The Family Compass by Jerry Nuerge

The Family Compass by Jerry Nuerge

 

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Families often lack a compass for navigating through potential distractions. Most high net worth people believe that if they have signed all their trust documents and wills, they have taken care of their future. After all, their attorneys and CPAs have assured them that the maximum amount of financial assets will be transferred to their spouse and then to their children with as little loss to the tax man as possible. Unfortunately, research shows that only ten percent of financial assets make it to the fourth generation.

 

A family’s values are just as important as those of a corporation, but they receive far less attention. I have found it more beneficial to families to focus on three often ignored components that have the potential to extend a legacy indefinitely:

 

1) What are your values?

 

2) What virtues will we pursue?

 

3) What do we want our family story to be?

 

Collectively, these are family brand equity, the core of a family’s culture. The values define the family, the virtues build the family, and the story describes the family.

 

 

VALUES

Rather than elevate whatever human values are currently in vogue in our culture, we identify our family’s values based on the evidence of our calendar and pocketbook. 

 

 

VIRTUES

Virtues are frequently underestimated in importance. Aristotle argued that substantial happiness and human flourishing could be grasped only through the virtues. King Solomon stated it this way: “My son, do not forget my teaching, but keep my commands in your heart, for they will prolong your life many years and bring you peace and prosperity. Let love and faithfulness never leave you.” (Proverbs 3:1-3)
 
The battle of morality is not so much about knowing what is right as it is doing what is right. 

 

 

STORY

The family story is a crucial component. Think of the family story as an ongoing stream of past, present, and future stories of family members woven together. These stories, infused with the family’s values and virtues, provide a sense of identity as well as motivation to not be the generation that weakens the heritage.

 

 

Imagine the priceless joy when family brand equity is the focal point of our transfers to the next generation! These assets empower families to live intentionally productive lives for multiple generations.

 

 

 

To learn more about the Center for Family Conversations and the new book, Unheritage, click here.

 

 

 

 

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO JERRY?

 

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Jerry Nuerge is founder and owner of the Financial Independence Group. He is also the creator of the Wealth Integration and Transfer System™, the Generation Connection Process™, as well as the Revenue Retrieval System™. Jerry holds a BBA and MBA degree, holds the Chartered Advisor in Philanthropy (CAP), is a Chartered Life Underwriter (CLU), a Chartered Financial Consultant (ChFC), a Certified Family Wealth Counselor (CFWC), and a Registered Investment Advisor (RIA). He is a lifetime member of the Million Dollar Round Table (MDRT), and has qualified for its “Top of the Table.” He also belongs to the National Estate Planning Council, the Society of Financial Service Professionals, the National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors (NAIFA), and is a past-president of the local chapters of these organizations.

 

 

Jerry is a member of Kingdom Advisors (KA) and a charter member of the Int’l Association of Advisors in Philanthropy (AiP), which he served as president in 2009.

 

 

Jerry has been married to his wife, Sharon, since 1967, and has three children and eight grandchildren, all living in the Fort Wayne, IN area.

 

 

Co-author of Family Wealth Counseling: Getting to the Heart of the Matter and author of The Priceless Gift, Jerry is active as a consultant and national speaker.

Building a Family Business that Lasts

Building a Family Business that Lasts

 

Dr. Joseph H. Astrachan, Executive Director of the Cox Family Enterprise Center at Kennesaw State University, speaks on on the topic of Building a Family Business That Lasts and provides viewers with four key points to walk away with. 

A Family Wired For Perpetual Dependence by Tom Deans

A Family Wired For Perpetual Dependence by Tom Deans, Ph.D.

 

Everyday Business Tom Deans

 

When the sale of a family business is all about a founder becoming wealthy and their children losing their jobs, you can see why so few ever put themselves in play and sell.

 

The CEO – the Chief Emotional Officer (Mom, and increasingly Dad) – just can’t stand to see the family pull itself apart. Killing the business with love has always felt like a better plan.

 

With a wave of aging business owners trying to figure out how they’ll fund their retirement, you can understand the temptation to simply throttle back on their day-to-day involvement and draw a salary while Junior runs the business until the final curtain falls.

 

Of course, as I’ve discussed in previous articles, with owners living longer, it’s improbable that Junior is going to hang around the business into his or her 70s, when Mom and Dad finally reach their 90s and hand over the reins of control – not operating control, I mean real control, control of the voting stock transferred when the last parent dies.

 

How About an Exit Where Everyone Makes Money?

 

But what if an advisor could frame the exit of the controlling shareholder as the day when all family members become wealthy? Far too often, death is the triggering event for the transfer of stock. Few children are offered an opportunity to risk their capital to buy the stock of their parents’ business at an early age. I recommend that when a child is 14, the parents and advisors begin the process of implanting the idea that the family business will be bought, not gifted, and that employment is different from ownership.

 

For a variety of reasons, the majority of parents signal that there’s no real or pressing need to recycle dollars in the family: “Hang around long enough, Junior, and all this will be yours – for free.”

 

Of course we know that nothing is ever really free and that while the ownership question is left hanging, there are as many underpaid children working in family businesses, as there are overpaid children. My experience on the speaking circuit is that few overpaid children ever risk their capital to buy out their parents. Why derail the gravy train? Parents who use their business to purchase and control family harmony do more harm than good and always pay the greatest price of all – a family wired for perpetual dependence.

 

Family Business Math

 

The dysfunction around the issue of compensation percolates and festers because the stakes have always been high. When Junior complains about low wages, some parents simply say, “If you don’t like what you’re paid, leave.” Emotionally and financially, it’s never been easy for a child to quit a parent’s business.

 

Child Quitting Over Compensation + Aging Business Owner = Less Inheritance For Junior. 
You can see how family business math becomes really interesting when only one child working in the business quits and one or more siblings stay and toe the family line. Trimming the family tree, hacking off a limb, call it what you want, the family business too often becomes the fault line in relationships and turns financially advantaged families into emotionally bankrupt ones.

 

The equation for this scenario looks like this:

 

The Value of the Family Business When Child Leaves Over Compensation = More Money for Remaining Children

 

The Link Between Compensation and Wealth Protection Is Profound

 

What if the mathematics of a great exit has always been rudimentary? What if advisors could convince clients that all family members, both inside and outside the business, can build a great exit plan collaboratively? What if the key to this plan is asking children to risk capital and perpetuate the business for the right reason – because they think they can grow it and make money? Now there’s a novel idea.

 

For this to be successful, family members working in a business need to be paid for the value they add. There are significant risks to an owner’s successful exit when compensation for family members is too low or too high. Getting compensation right is one of the pre-conditions for leading a business to be sold to someone, either inside or outside the family – but sold nevertheless.

 

Dynastic Families Understand This Equation

 

Business Owner Paid Appropriately + Children in Business Paid Appropriately + All Other Relatives Outside the Business Not Paid at All by the Business = Business Sold, Wealth Protected, Happy Family

 

It’s simple addition – so simple it’s often overlooked. Treat your family business like a drive-thru ATM and pay family members not involved in the business for work not done, and your exit will be a tad complicated and painful. Keep treating your children as indentured laborers and you’ll get to the same place. If you’re a business owner, all of this can seem difficult. It is, but it’s not impossible and it’s definitely worth getting compensation right.

 

If you are an advisor, are you really prepared to leave your spreadsheets in your briefcase and talk to clients about important issues like compensating family members appropriately? Can you see the link between compensation and protecting your client’s wealth is an emotional issue? Can you see that the hard emotional issues are where advisors earn client trust?

 

Book Tom Deans Today For Your Next Conference, Click Here.

Dr. Phil: The Darkness of Riches: From Victims to Victors

Dr. Phil: The Darkness of Riches: From Victims to Victors

 

 

 

Family vs. Business by Family Wealth Coach

Family vs. Business by Family Wealth Coach

 

TomSorgeandAllisonMaherOct2011

 

As a business owner, you take on a unique challenge. Every day you are faced with both business and family decisions. And family business owners deal with this even more.

 

Sometimes people feel that those two aspects of their lives are really at odds with each other. They absolutely can be—but they don’t have to be if you manage both of them carefully.

 

Think about your family and business in terms of a pendulum, or a teeter-totter. Your family is on one side, and your business on the other. Every decision you make will have both business and family implications. For example, promoting one of your children as CEO, or even deciding when your children will engage with the business as either employees or shareholders, will have an effect at home and at work.

 

Sometimes you will have to prioritize business over family, or family over business. Again, think of the teeter-totter, when you make a decision for one side, the other side will also be impacted.

 

The key take away here is that Estate plans have to consider both – who gets voting control, who will manage the business, how will you look after your family? Balancing a teeter-totter (or a family and a business) is not easy when both sides are so intricately linked to each other.

 

The name “teeter-totter” may suggest otherwise, but finding the equilibrium is always possible with some careful planning and accurate adjustments. The same is true for your family and your business.

Family Business Owner Driving the Kids Crazy – Someone Call Security – Tom Deans

Family Business Owner Driving the Kids Crazy – Someone Call Security – Tom Deans

 

Everyday Business Tom Deans

 

Last month I was speaking at a convention in Vancouver and took a question from the audience that made me laugh, even though I’d heard versions of the question before: “How do I get my 85-year-old father to stop coming to the office and causing all sorts of disruption?”

 

Before I could answer someone in the crowd shouted, “Remove the wheelchair ramp to the office!” The place went crazy. Laughing uncontrollably myself, I tried to get the room back on track by sharing my own family business story.

 

Now we all know it’s the prerogative of business owners to work as long as they choose – it’s one of the great perks of owning a business: voting control = management control. The great casualty is most often the succeeding generation, who are forced to walk the fine line between respecting a parent’s right to work and maintaining responsibility for driving profits through innovation.

 

But sometimes those profits are elusive precisely because parents never, ever leave and change is discouraged.

 

Fortunately, there is a simple and often overlooked solution that can channel the abilities and desires of both generations while keeping the fundamental goal of making money in focus – it’s called the Honorary Chairman.

 

Honorary Chairman: Complete with Job Description

 

I still have a vivid memory of my grandfather’s last business card, carrying the title “Founder and Honorary Chairman.” I loved that title and looking back, I think he did too – the title and the role he carved out for himself was that of wise counsel. It was a job that in some peculiar way suited him, as the founder of a significant manufacturing business, perfectly – a job he was driving toward his entire career. He was a naturally inclined philosopher and contrarian who loved provoking debate – the “why” was always more interesting than the “how” for him. Most importantly, in the last chapter of his life this role was carved out, respected and resourced but was really limited to board meetings and special projects.

 

The idea of the Office of the Honorary Chairman – and the literal office – always remained a safe haven from the threat of a mundane retirement (code for being relegated to staying home with my grandmother). The title was not, however, a license to wade into the details of ongoing operational issues. Rather, it was a place and a space for the founder to think and offer historical context and principled counsel without all the background noise of everyday business issues that too often cloud judgment.

 

Interestingly enough, I watched my father do precisely the same thing when I assumed the position of president of his manufacturing business. Culturally, the notion of wise counsel has resided in all our family businesses.

 

Business owners should be encouraged to establish truly independent advisory boards. Your freshly minted Honorary Chairman ought to be charged with the task of creating that board and chairing the meetings. This is precisely where his or her energies can best be leveraged – for everyone’s personal and professional sanity.

 

Advisors who ask their business owner clients, “When do you see yourself disengaging from the operations of the business?” can bring much-needed relief to the succeeding generation. Advisors who can encourage the establishment of an advisory board can themselves participate on these boards and thereby gain a front row seat to help families with their transitions.

 

Are you a strategic advisor offering new ideas or one responding with technical solutions after the fact?

 

To book Dr. Tom Deans as a Keynote for your Next Event, click here.

Do you have a Chief Legacy Officer? by Family Wealth Coach

Do you have a Chief Legacy Officer? by Family Wealth Coach

 

TomSorgeandAllisonMaherOct2011

No, that’s not a mistake in the title. But we wouldn’t blame you for thinking that, because Chief Legacy Officers are a relatively new idea.

 

We get lots of feedback about how much the “values and vision” concepts in our blogs resonate with readers. We can imagine though, that with everything else that’s going on in your life, it can be difficult to implement some of those ideas as effectively, efficiently and directly as you’d like. That’s where the Chief Legacy Officer comes in.

 

The idea behind the “Chief Legacy Officer” originated from the Family Office Exchange. It’s an idea that we’re enthusiastic about because a Chief Legacy Officer is to values and vision, what a CEO is to executive decisions, and a CFO is to financial decisions. We firmly believe that decisions about values, vision and mission play as crucial of a role in your business and family office as the executive and financial decision-making aspects. After all, there needs to be a driving reason behind making those executive and financial decisions.

 

A Chief Legacy Officer can help to define governance structures, and can be designated to implement some of the important concepts that we’ve discussed in past blogs such as engaging and educating the next generation.

 

This isn’t a fluffy role; it should be taken just as seriously as the selection of a CEO and CFO. However, one difference to consider between those roles and a Chief Legacy Officer is that experience isn’t always an asset. Leaving this role to the first generation can have risks. Incorporate the second and third generation’s views. The first generation’s take on all of this is great, but it will fade with them if the younger generation’s views are not also considered.

 

Incorporating a Chief Legacy Officer gives you the opportunity to focus attention and energy on all angles of your family business and estate—not just the obvious ones.

Beyond Empowerment – Are We Ready for the Self-Managed organization?: Doug Kirkpatrick

Beyond Empowerment – Are We Ready for the Self-Managed organization?: Doug Kirkpatrick

 

doug kirkpatrick

Doug is a Northern California-based executive coach, organizational consultant, speaker, author and educator. He is the author of Beyond Empowerment: The Age of the Self-Managed Organization. An economics graduate of Pacific Lutheran University, he also holds a law degree from Willamette University College of Law and a Senior Professional in Human Resources designation (SPHR). He enjoys traveling to rough parts of the world and appreciates the perspective that he gains from it.