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PhotoReading – American photoreaders talk about photoreading

PhotoReading – American photoreaders talk about photoreading

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Paul Scheely of Learning Strategies and American photoreaders talking about their experiences with photoreading and speed reading.

Eventually No One Will Feel Ostracized – Embracing Differences: Erika Gruidl

Eventually No One Will Feel Ostracized – Embracing Differences: Erika Gruidl

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See how one high school student created a team to overcome bureaucracy and life-long lessons in ignoring those with differences, causing a local school to step away from the exclusive mentality of high school and embrace the differences of six remarkable students. Special needs students that had been isolated in the school system became super stars at Livermore High. The change initiated in 2011 persisted with incoming Freshman, as the student body demonstrated to the younger students, who had not yet seen the Shooting Stars, ‘how to act with those with differences.’

Erika Gruidl, Founder of Shooting Stars, a cheer squad comprised of Special Needs students, speaks about the journey in creating a world where everyone feels welcomed. Erika loved performing as a varsity cheerleader for her school and believed Special Needs students deserved the chance to experience the same sort of joy. After initial resistance, the Shooting Stars were ultimately acknowledged, recognized and welcomed by the entire student body.

 

What we learned from 5 million books – Erez Lieberman Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel

What we learned from 5 million books – Erez Lieberman Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel

Have you played with Google Labs’ Ngram Viewer? It’s an addicting tool that lets you search for words and ideas in a database of 5 million books from across centuries. Erez Lieberman Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel show us how it works, and a few of the surprising things we can learn from 500 billion words.

 

Study the habits of successful role models – Jack Canfield

Any fool can criticize – Dale Carnegie

Comma story – Terisa Folaron

Comma story – Terisa Folaron

It isn’t easy holding complex sentences together (just ask a conjunction or a subordinate), but the clever little comma can help lighten the load. But how to tell when help is really needed? Terisa Folaron offers some tricks of the comma trade.

The infinite life of pi – Reynaldo Lopes

The infinite life of pi – Reynaldo Lopes

The ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter is always the same: 3.14159… and on and on (literally!) forever. This irrational number, pi, has an infinite number of digits, so we’ll never figure out its exact value no matter how close we seem to get. Reynaldo Lopes explains pi’s vast applications to the study of music, financial models, and even the density of the universe.

 

Teachers can affect learners – Cicero

How to Read 300% Faster

Be a speed-reader in as little as a month!

How to Read 300% Faster

Narrative Humility: Sayantani DasGupta

Narrative Humility: Sayantani DasGupta

Sayantani is a physican and writer, originally trained in pediatrics and public health, who is a faculty member in the Master’s Program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia University and the Graduate Program in Health Advocacy at Sarah Lawrence College. Sayantani teaches courses on illness and disability memoir, and narrative, health and social justice. She is a widely published and nationally recognized speaker on issues of narrative, health care, race, gender and medical education, and in 2012 was featured in Oprah Magazine in an article on Narrative Medicine – which she describes as the clinical and scholarly movement to find health care’s lost art of story-telling and story listening. She is the co-author of The Demon Slayers and Other Stories: Bengali Folktales, the author of a memoir about her education at Johns Hopkins, Her Own Medicine: A Woman’s Journey from Student to Doctor, and the co-editor of an award winning collection of women’s illness narratives, Stories of Illness and Healing: Women Write their Bodies.

Stories have always been at the heart of health and healing. Before fancy imaging equipment or lab tests in their metaphorical black bags, they had the ability to be present, to witness another human being’s life and death, suffering and joy. Narrative medicine is the clinical and scholarly movement to find health care’s lost art of storytelling and story listening. A narrative understanding of health care honors the ancient, storied heart of healing, while teaching those responding to stories—clinicians, therapists, family members, and advocates—how to go about the art of witnessing. Witnessing stories from a position of Narrative Humility acknowledges that stories of the ill are not objects in which to become ‘competent’ or master, but rather, dynamic entities that for healers to approach and engage with, while simultaneously remaining open to their ambiguity and contradiction, and engaging in constant self-evaluation and self-critique about issues like the witnesses role in the story, expectations of the story, responsibilities to the story, and identifications with the story. Narrative humility is a philosophy of listening which holds potential beyond health care as well, in any situation where more powerful individuals engage with stories of those who are socially, culturally or politically less powerful. It acknowledges that the listener — be that a clinician, reporter, policy maker, or teacher — must willingly place herself in a position of some transparency. The witness must not only see, but be seen, and by doing so, enable herself to see even more clearly.