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IMF Chief Christine Lagarde expresses optimism about the global economy

IMF Chief Christine Lagarde at Stanford’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

 

Christine Lagarde, head of the IMF, expresses optimism about the global economy during a talk at Stanford on Feb. 25, 2014. Credit: Roger Winkelman 

Using Water Wisely: The Business Case for Sustainable Water Management

Using Water Wisely: The Business Case for Sustainable Water Management

 

Two thought-provoking conversations on how corporate water management strategies are developed and implemented, featuring Tom Cooper, Corporate Water Programs Manager at Intel, and Greg Koch, Directer of Global Water Stewardship at The Coca-Cola Company. Moderated by Brad Gentry 

Predicting the Future of the World Economy

Predicting the Future of the World Economy

 

When professional stock analysts can’t predict the market — and when monkeys throwing darts at a newspaper pick as many winners as seasoned portfolio managers — who, if anyone, can predict what’s ahead? Five of the foremost economists of our time match wits with Gideon Rose, editor of Foreign Affairs, to uncover the trends that will move markets in the months and years to come.

The panel includes:

 

Jacob Frenkel, chairman, JPMorganChase International
Glenn Hubbard, dean and Russell L. Carson Professor of Finance and Economics, Columbia Business School,
Ruchir Sharma, Head of Emerging Markets and Global Macro, Morgan Stanley Investment Management
Joseph Stiglitz, University Professor, Columbia University
Shang-Jin Wei, NT Wang Professor of Chinese Business and Economy; Director of the Jerome A. Chazen Institute of International Business, Columbia Business School

 

Presented by the Chazen Institute of International Business with media partner Foreign Affairs. 

Business Growth Strategies: Double Your Customer Base Overnight by Peter Ireland

Entrepreneurs and Small Business Owners Can Use Acquisitions to Double or Triple Their Customer Base Overnight

 

Oftentimes it’s easier to significantly increase your customer base through the acquisition of competitors than it is with the more commonly used marketing route.  Anyone with at least a modicum of business experience appreciates just how challenging it is for an established business to grow its customer base by 10% per annum if it relies solely on marketing efforts.  On the other hand, the acquisition of a competitor can double, triple, or quadruple your customer base at deal closing.

business growth strategies

 Business Growth Strategies

 

 

What many business owners don’t realize is that it can be cheaper as well faster to go with the acquisitions growth strategy. To illustrate this, let’s take a look at cases where this was capitalized on from the recent past.  Specifically, let’s look at businesses which utilized subscriber revenue models such as cable-TV and Internet service providers.  If you owned a small system in either industry, you were faced with a choice of growth through marketing or acquisitions. Now suppose that you had set as your goal a doubling of your subscriber base in five year’s time. We will assume that this target is extrapolated from your growth rates over the last three years. An analysis of your customer acquisition costs needed to double your sales over three years may show that a marketing based strategy’s costs will exceed those of an acquisition strategy.  Morever, the acquisitions route will achieve your goal by doubling the subscriber base as soon as the deal is finalized.

 

Are you still not convinced that an acquisitions-base growth strategy is the way to go? Okay, let me throw in another reason to seriously consider this option: lower risk. Yes, if you know your business and industry and decide to buy-out a competitor your risk can be reduced because you are taking control of an asset that you understand and that has passed your due diligence. Imagine for a moment that you own and operate a pizza parlor and are looking for ways to expand. One day a marketing consultant calls on you to pitch a new marketing strategy which he promises will double your sales over three years–but at a substantial cost. The week after you are notified by a friend that your competitor down the street is for sale. Acquisition of this pizza joint would instantly double your revenue. You compare the prices of the two options and discover that they are only about 15% apart.

 

Which is the lower risk option? In most cases, the acquisition of an add-on profit center for your business. After all, you already know to successfully operate such a business and the lenders will trust you more than someone needing a loan to attempt some unproven growth strategy.

 

Business Growth via Acquisitions

 

Back in the 1990s, there was a great deal of M&A activity in the printing industry.  One large printer embarked on an acquisitions strategy to expand the market for its three core services: document scanning, fast high-volume printing, and distribution of legal documents, such as proxy statements and collections letters.  As a result, the company focused on acquiring small printers which offered only one of these three services. After the acquisition, the absorbed company would be able to offer its customers the expanded range of services made possible by the acquirer.  This, in turn, enabled them to win over larger local accounts that they could not have otherwise serviced before.

 

This is a typical example of what drives a company to employ an acquisitions strategy.

 

The Tycoon Playbook covers the details of designing a successful M&A strategy for small businesses and entrepreneurial companies.

The Trust Economy: David Etheredge

The Trust Economy: David Etheredge

 

the trust economy

From stints at Walt Disney Interactive and Microprose software to the Director of International Business Development at Hasbro and as minority partner in renewable energy company, Wind Works, David Etheredge brings an eclectic mix of passion for theatre, technology know-how, and business acumen to his current venture, SavvyCard. Through SavvyCard, David leverages the growth of mobile devices to build the “trust economy”.

 

Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal on his country’s economic future – Lugen Family Office

Saudi Arabian billionaire prince on his country’s economic futures in wake of tumbling gas price

 

prince alwaleed bin talal

Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal ranks 17th on the Bloomberg list of billionaires, and has urged his nation to diversify its economy as the U.S. increases its own energy production. He speaks with the “CBS This Morning” co-hosts about how increased production of oil in the U.S. may affect global relations.

 

A Faith Based Economic Worldview

Part One - The Ideal Economy

To learn more, click here. 

 

Part Two – What Goes Wrong

To learn more, click here.

 

Part Three - Why It Goes Wrong

To learn more, click here. 

 

Part Four - Principled Reasoning

To learn more, click here. 

 

Part Five - Investment Decision Making

To learn more, click here. 

 

Part Six - Global Economy and Investment Markets

To learn more, click here. 

Canadian billionaire predicts end of US Dollar as world’s reserve currency Ned Goodman lecture

Canadian billionaire predicts end of US Dollar as world’s reserve currency Ned Goodman lecture

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This video may contain copyrighted material. Such material is made available for educational purposes only. This constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C. section 106A-117 of the U.S. Copyright Law.

 

Billionaires Dumping Stock + Running From Wall St.

Billionaires Dumping Stock + Running From Wall St.

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Billionaires are jumping ship from Wall St., with Warren Buffet and George Soros among the notable 1% dumping their stocks in an effort to avoid a feared market crash. We look at analysis of the moves by the power hitters and how too big to fail banks look set to take another hit in this Buzzsaw news clip with Tyrel Ventura and Tabetha Wallace.

 

46 Percent of global wealth owned by richest 1 percent