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What Would You Die For? | Brad McLain

What Would You Die For? | Brad McLain

 

This talk looks at the nature and impact of extraordinary experiences, especially how such experiences may change our sense of self or identity.

 

Brad is a social science research professor at the University of Colorado Boulder’s Center for STEM Learning and is co-director of The Experiential Science Education Research Collaborative. Dr. McLain is an accomplished filmmaker originally from Norfolk, Nebraska, and he attended the University of Nebraska Lincoln for part of his undergraduate education. He is a member of the board of directors for the JGI, Jane Goodall institute.

Shaka Senghor – Why your worst deeds don’t define you

Shaka Senghor: Why your worst deeds don’t define you

 

In 1991, Shaka Senghor shot and killed a man. He was, he says, “a drug dealer with a quick temper and a semi-automatic pistol.” Jailed for second degree murder, that could very well have been the end of the story. But it wasn’t. Instead, it was the beginning of a years-long journey to redemption, one with humbling and sobering lessons for us all. 

Kevin Briggs: The bridge between suicide and life

Kevin Briggs: The bridge between suicide and life

 

For many years Sergeant Kevin Briggs had a dark, unusual, at times strangely rewarding job: He patrolled the southern end of San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge, a popular site for suicide attempts. In a sobering, deeply personal talk Briggs shares stories from those he’s spoken — and listened — to standing on the edge of life. He gives a powerful piece of advice to those with loved ones who might be contemplating suicide.

 

Thomas W. Laqueur: Why Do We Care for the Dead?

Thomas W. Laqueur: Why Do We Care for the Dead?

 

 
When his friends asked Diogenes the Cynic what he wanted done with his body after he died, he told them that they should throw it over the wall to be eaten by the beasts and birds. And why not? It was no longer his; he would not notice.
 
For more than 2,000 years, conversations in the West—and elsewhere—have acknowledged that Diogenes had a point. And yet we as a species care for our dead. This lecture by Thomas W. Laqueur offers an answer for why this should be the case from both a general anthropological perspective and from the vantage of particular historical cases.
 
The living need the dead more than the dead need the living.
 
Thomas W. Laqueur is a professor of history at the University of California, Berkeley.

Stephen Cave: The 4 stories we tell ourselves about death – Lugen Family Office

Stephen Cave: The 4 stories we tell ourselves about death – Lugen Family Office

 

death

 

Philosopher Stephen Cave begins with a dark but compelling question: When did you first realize you were going to die? And even more interestingly: Why do we humans so often resist the inevitability of death? In a fascinating talk Cave explores four narratives — common across civilizations — that we tell ourselves “in order to help us manage the terror of death.”

Philosopher Stephen Cave wants to know: Why is humanity so obsessed with living forever? 

 

Why You Should Listen To Him?

 

Stephen Cave is a writer and philosopher who is obsessed with our obsession with immortality. In 2012 he published Immortality: The Quest to Live Forever and How It Drives Civilization, an inquiry into humanity’s rather irrational resistance to the inevitability of death. Cave moves across time and history’s major civilizations and religions to explore just what drives this instinct — and what that means for the future. Cave writes for The Financial Times and contributes toThe New York TimesThe Guardian and Wired

Live as if you were to die tomorrow – Gandhi

One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it is worth watching.

One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it is worth watching.

One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it is worth watching.

Judy MacDonald Johnston: Prepare for a good end of life

Judy MacDonald Johnston: Prepare for a good end of life

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Thinking about death is frightening, but planning ahead is practical and leaves more room for peace of mind in our final days. In a solemn, thoughtful talk, Judy MacDonald Johnston shares 5 practices for planning for a good end of life.

By day, Judy MacDonald develops children’s reading programs. By night, she helps others maintain their quality of life as they near death.

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO HER?

Judy MacDonald Johnston is the Publisher and Cofounder of Blue Lake Children’s Publishing, which develops educational reading tools for preschoolers through a program called the Tessy and Tab Reading Club. Johnston’s credo, “love words early,” and her focus on the earliest years of life, is an interesting foil for her other passion: Planning for end of life. Johnston’s side project, Good [End of] Life, deals not with happy babies decoding symbols, but with a much more morbid topic: Death. Good [End of] Life is a set of online worksheets and practices that aim to help deal with difficult questions — like who should speak for you if you cannot speak, and whether to fill out a do-not-resuscitate form — before it’s too late.

In the past 15 years alone Johnston has founded two other companies in addition to Blue Lake Children’s Publishing: PrintPaks, a children’s software company, and Kibu, a social networking site for teenage girls. Previously Johnston was a Worldwide Project Marketing Manager at Hewlett Packard.

“[Johnston]’s leveraged every single advantage she’s been given into creating a hundred times that for others, never holding tight to wisdom or resources, but investing them where they’ll do the most good next.”  from 50-for-50

 

How Michael Jackson’s death unfolded

How Michael Jackson’s death unfolded

CNN’s Randi Kaye reports on the death of entertainer Michael Jackson and the ensuing investigation.

Every man dies, not every man really lives

Every man dies, not every man really lives

Every man dies, not every man really lives