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“Change Crowdsourcing — beyond an illusion”: Albana VRIONI

“Change Crowdsourcing — beyond an illusion”: Albana VRIONI

 

Albana Vrioni explores how Change Crowdsourcing is realizing a shift in driving organizational and societal change. She sees the landscape of organisational and societal change as hot, flat, and crowded — as the pressure for transparency, the mass-digitalisation, and the growing sense of connectedness, especially within younger generations, are setting the tone of the modern lifestyle.Through Social Technologies, she argues, change leaders can stir the creativity of the crowd to co-create radical change in a smooth way – they can engage the collective intelligence to realize organisational and societal innovation that otherwise is unattainable.
 
As change adviser and facilitator, Albana assists business leaders manage strategic change from a holistic perspective. She is actively involved in promoting sustainable management strategies and practices. Her expertise evolves around IT enabled transformation, with successful projects delivered for European Institutions and National Administrations, medium and large internationals.

LOYAL3 CEO Barry Schneider – We Get To Invent Every Single Day

LOYAL3 CEO Barry Schneider: We Get To Invent Every Single Day

 

How do you democratize the stock market? Chairman and CEO Barry Schneider shares LOYAL3’s vision and driving principles for the five-year old startup. LOYAL3 allows companies going public to sell IPO stock to individual investors at the same price as Wall Street. Schneider explains why his company is taking risks and going beyond the status quo to disrupt the capital markets: “There has been precisely 3 IPOs that have ever been crowdsourced. We’ve done them all.” They helped AMC Theatres and Santander Consumer USA go public.Schneider also shares three important values that make up his company’s culture: integrity, innovation, and interdependence. Schneider guest lectured in JD Schramm’s Strategic Communication course on Monday May 19, 2014 where this talk was originally delivered. 

Justin Bieber: Budding Venture Capitalist

Justin Bieber: Budding Venture Capitalist

The pop star is putting his money into tech startups like Spotify.

Robin Chase: Excuse me, may I rent your car?

Robin Chase: Excuse me, may I rent your car?

 

A decade ago, Robin Chase founded Zipcar in the US, now the largest car-sharing company in the world. Now she’s exploring the next level of car-sharing: Buzzcar, a French startup that lets people rent their own cars to others. The details are fascinating (how does insurance work, exactly?), and the larger vision (she calls it Peers, Inc.) points to a new definition of ownership and entrepreneurship.

 

With Zipcar, Robin Chase introduced car-crazy America to the concept of non-ownership. Now she’s flipping that model with Buzzcar, which lets you rent your own auto to your neighbors.

 

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO HER?

 

If she weren’t a proven entrepreneur, you might imagine Robin Chase as a transportation geek, a dedicated civil servant, endlessly refining computer models of freeway traffic. If she weren’t such a green-conscious problem-solver, you might take her for a startup whiz. Case in point: In 2000, Chase focused her MIT business training on a car-sharing scheme imported from Europe and co-founded Zipcar, now the largest car-sharing business in the world. Using a wireless key, location awareness and Internet billing, members pick up Zipcars at myriad locations anytime they want one.

 

Now Chase has launched Buzzcar, a car-sharing service in France with a twist: instead of a fleet of green Zipcars, the service lets users share their own cars and make money off their unused capacity. Call it peer-to-peer auto rental.

 

“Robin Chase has already changed the way we drive, but she’s not satisfied. Now she wants to change the way we live as well.”  Harvard Gazette

Clay Shirky: Institutions vs. collaboration

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Clay Shirky shows how closed groups and companies will give way to looser networks where small contributors have big roles and fluid cooperation replaces rigid planning. Clay Shirky argues that the history of the modern world could be rendered as the history of ways of arguing, where changes in media change what sort of arguments are possible — with deep social and political implications.

Why you should listen to him:

Clay Shirky’s work focuses on the rising usefulness of networks — using decentralized technologies such as peer-to-peer sharing, wireless, software for social creation, and open-source development. New technologies are enabling new kinds of cooperative structures to flourish as a way of getting things done in business, science, the arts and elsewhere, as an alternative to centralized and institutional structures, which he sees as self-limiting. In his writings and speeches he has argued that “a group is its own worst enemy.”

Shirky is an adjunct professor in New York Universityʼs graduate Interactive Telecommunications Program, where he teaches a course named “Social Weather.” Heʼs the author of several books.

“Shirky is one of the handful of people with justifiable claim to the digerati moniker. He’s become a consistently prescient voice on networks, social software, and technology’s effects on society.”   WIRED

 

Nicholas Christakis: The hidden influence of social networks

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We’re all embedded in vast social networks of friends, family, co-workers and more. Nicholas Christakis tracks how a wide variety of traits — from happiness to obesity — can spread from person to person, showing how your location in the network might impact your life in ways you don’t even know.

Nicholas Christakis explores how the large-scale, face-to-face social networks in which we are embedded affect our lives, and what we can do to take advantage of this fact.

Why you should listen to him:

People aren’t merely social animals in the usual sense, for we don’t just live in groups. We live in networks — and we have done so ever since we emerged from the African savannah. Via intricately branching paths tracing out cascading family connections, friendship ties, and work relationships, we are interconnected to hundreds or even thousands of specific people, most of whom we do not know. We affect them and they affect us.

Nicholas Christakis’ work examines the biological, psychological, sociological, and mathematical rules that govern how we form these social networks, and the rules that govern how they shape our lives. His work shows how phenomena as diverse as obesity, smoking, emotions, ideas, germs, and altruism can spread through our social ties, and how genes can partially underlie our creation of social ties to begin with. His work also sheds light on how we might take advantage of an understanding of social networks to make the world a better place.

At Harvard, Christakis is a Professor of Medicine, Health Care Policy, and Sociology, and he directs a diverse research group investigating social networks. His popular undergraduate course (Life and Death in the US) is podcast [available on itunes]. His book, Connected, co-authored with James H. Fowler, appeared in 2009, and has been translated into nearly 20 languages. In 2009, he was named by Time magazine to its annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world, and also by Foreign Policy magazine to its list of 100 top global thinkers.

“‘Connected‘ is [in the category of] works of brilliant originality that stimulate and enlighten and can sometimes even change the way we understand the world”  NY Times Book Review

Renowned scientists Christakis and Fowler present compelling evidence for our profound influence on one another’s tastes, health, wealth, happiness, beliefs, even weight, as they explain how social networks form and how they operate.

 

Jamie Drummond: Let’s crowdsource the world’s goals

In 2000, the UN laid out 8 goals to make the world better by reducing poverty and disease — with a deadline of 2015. As that deadline approaches, Jamie Drummond of ONE.org runs down the surprising successes of the 8 Millennium Development Goals, and suggests a crowdsourced reboot for the next 15 years.

 

Jamie Drummond co-founded the advocacy organization ONE, whose central themes are ending extreme poverty and fighting the AIDS pandemic

 

Why you should listen to him:

 

ONE (whose co-founders include rock star Bono) advocates for aid, trade, debt cancellation, investment and governance reform to help the citizens of emerging countries drive and determine their own destiny. Right now, the group’s focus is the UN’s Millennium Development Goals, eight benchmarks for health, justice and well-being announced in 2000 and targeted to be achieved in 2015. ONE is working to accelerate attention on the MDGs in the last four years of the challenge.