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Society minds, technology doesn´t: Yvonne Rogers

Society minds, technology doesn´t: Yvonne Rogers

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Professor of Interaction Design and director of UCLIC at UCL. Her research interests are in the areas of ubiquitous computing, interaction design and human-computer interaction.

In her talk, Yvonne shows us the different effects technology has on us. She mentions various (negative) examples of too much smartphone usage and she shows us how to use technology and information wisely so that in the end we can use it to have more time and to be happier. (and not: being a slave of technology)

Power Of Pause : Sneha Iype Varma

Power Of Pause : Sneha Iype Varma

 

Texting that saves lives – Nancy Lublin

Texting that saves lives – Nancy Lublin

When Nancy Lublin started texting teenagers to help with her social advocacy organization, what she found was shocking — they started texting back about their own problems, from bullying to depression to abuse. So she’s setting up a text-only crisis line, and the results might be even more important than she expected.

 

What we learned from 5 million books – Erez Lieberman Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel

What we learned from 5 million books – Erez Lieberman Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel

Have you played with Google Labs’ Ngram Viewer? It’s an addicting tool that lets you search for words and ideas in a database of 5 million books from across centuries. Erez Lieberman Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel show us how it works, and a few of the surprising things we can learn from 500 billion words.

 

Any fool can criticize – Dale Carnegie

Narrative Humility: Sayantani DasGupta

Narrative Humility: Sayantani DasGupta

Sayantani is a physican and writer, originally trained in pediatrics and public health, who is a faculty member in the Master’s Program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia University and the Graduate Program in Health Advocacy at Sarah Lawrence College. Sayantani teaches courses on illness and disability memoir, and narrative, health and social justice. She is a widely published and nationally recognized speaker on issues of narrative, health care, race, gender and medical education, and in 2012 was featured in Oprah Magazine in an article on Narrative Medicine – which she describes as the clinical and scholarly movement to find health care’s lost art of story-telling and story listening. She is the co-author of The Demon Slayers and Other Stories: Bengali Folktales, the author of a memoir about her education at Johns Hopkins, Her Own Medicine: A Woman’s Journey from Student to Doctor, and the co-editor of an award winning collection of women’s illness narratives, Stories of Illness and Healing: Women Write their Bodies.

Stories have always been at the heart of health and healing. Before fancy imaging equipment or lab tests in their metaphorical black bags, they had the ability to be present, to witness another human being’s life and death, suffering and joy. Narrative medicine is the clinical and scholarly movement to find health care’s lost art of storytelling and story listening. A narrative understanding of health care honors the ancient, storied heart of healing, while teaching those responding to stories—clinicians, therapists, family members, and advocates—how to go about the art of witnessing. Witnessing stories from a position of Narrative Humility acknowledges that stories of the ill are not objects in which to become ‘competent’ or master, but rather, dynamic entities that for healers to approach and engage with, while simultaneously remaining open to their ambiguity and contradiction, and engaging in constant self-evaluation and self-critique about issues like the witnesses role in the story, expectations of the story, responsibilities to the story, and identifications with the story. Narrative humility is a philosophy of listening which holds potential beyond health care as well, in any situation where more powerful individuals engage with stories of those who are socially, culturally or politically less powerful. It acknowledges that the listener — be that a clinician, reporter, policy maker, or teacher — must willingly place herself in a position of some transparency. The witness must not only see, but be seen, and by doing so, enable herself to see even more clearly.

 

Shall We Talk?: Wujing Wang

Shall We Talk?: Wujing Wang

Wujing is interested in designing digital tools that help people learn more intuitively and efficiently. In her free time, she enjoys exploring the possibilities of life, which means making all kinds of mistakes and learning from them.

Wujing was the quietest kid in her family and the silence later became a “habit”. When she discovered that she was not able to express herself even when she wanted, she decided to challenge herself. Though having learned a lot about openness and its benefits, she still found it too hard to open her mouth or heart. Therefore, she started searching for the key to openness by her own and she did it in the oldest way–by asking people. It was in people’s real stories that she found the secret ingredient to openness. This talk is about her unique journey and her creative way of letting people who face the similar challenges inspire each other.

 

Fragmented Identities in a Hypermedia Culture: Tim Burke

Fragmented Identities in a Hypermedia Culture: Tim Burke

 

The liar’s punishment – George Bernard Shaw

Bruce Lee’s Creed