Climate

 
  • 10 global hot spots hit by urgent water crises

    The greatest global risk is running out of water for our 7.3 billion inhabitants. Already, some countries are reeling from this catastrophe.

     
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  • California’s scarce water keeps going to China

    As China’s middle class grows, rising food demand is influencing food production and water consumption in the American West, including California.

     
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  • A $24 trillion disaster covering 70% of the globe

    The oceans, which comprise 70% of the planet and support 2 million species, are dying. Here’s 5 of the biggest challenges facing our waters.

     
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  • The History of our Universe by Big History Project

    Introduction to Thresholds of Increasing Complexity | Big History Project       Threshold 1: The Big Bang | Big History Project       Threshold 2: The Stars Light Up | Big History Project       Crash Course Big History: Stars & Galaxies       Threshold 3: New Chemical Elements | Big History Project       The Periodic Table: Crash Course Chemistry       Threshold 4: Earth & Solar System | Big History Project       Crash Course Big History: The Solar System & the Earth       What Was The Young Earth Like? | Big History Project       Threshold 5: Life on Earth Video | Big History Project       Mini Thresholds Of Life | Big History Project       Crash Course Big History: The Origin of Life       How We Proved An Asteroid Wiped Out The Dinosaurs from The Big History Project       Threshold 6: Humans and Collective Learning | Big History Project       Crash Course Big History: Human Evolution       Migrations and Technological Creativity | Big History Project       Threshold 7: Agriculture | Big History Project       Where and Why Did the First Cities and States Appear? | Big History Project       Why Did Civilizations Expand? | Big History Project       How Did the World Become Interconnected? | Big History Project       Threshold 8: The Modern Revolution | Big History Project       Coal, Steam, and The Industrial Revolution: Crash Course World History       How Did Change Accelerate? | Big History Project    

     
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  • Using Water Wisely: The Business Case for Sustainable Water Management

    Using Water Wisely: The Business Case for Sustainable Water Management   Two thought-provoking conversations on how corporate water management strategies are developed and implemented, featuring Tom Cooper, Corporate Water Programs Manager at Intel, and Greg Koch, Directer of Global Water Stewardship at The Coca-Cola Company. Moderated by Brad Gentry 

     
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  • Chris McKnett: The investment logic for sustainability

    Chris McKnett: The investment logic for sustainability   Sustainability is pretty clearly one of the world’s most important goals; but what groups can really make environmental progress in leaps and bounds? Chris McKnett makes the case that it’s large institutional investors. He shows how strong financial data isn’t enough, and reveals why investors need to look at a company’s environmental, social and governance structures, too. Chris McKnett helps institutional investors put money toward sustainable and socially-forward assets.    WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO HIM?   At State Street Global Advisors, Chris McKnett thinks deeply about how large investors, like banks, pension funds and endowments, can put their money in the right places — not just for better business, but for a better world. In his role as the head of State Street Global Advisors’ Environmental, Social and Governance Investing (ESG), McKnett develops sustainable-strategic products and integrates sustainability thinking directly into the investment process.

     
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  • Air pollution is more carcinogenic than second hand cigarette smoke

     
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  • Two young scientists break down plastics with bacteria

    Two young scientists break down plastics with bacteria Once it’s created, plastic (almost) never dies. While in 12th grade Miranda Wang and Jeanny Yao went in search of a new bacteria to biodegrade plastic — specifically by breaking down phthalates, a harmful plasticizer. They found an answer surprisingly close to home. Miranda Wang and Jeanny Yao have identified a new bacteria that breaks down nasty compounds called phthalates, common to flexible plastics and linked to health problems. And they’re still teenagers. WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO THEM? After a visit to a plastic-filled waste transfer station last year, students Miranda Wang andJeanny Yao learned that much of the plastic in trash may not degrade for 5,000 years. Synthesized into plastics are phthalates, compounds that make shower curtain liners, food wraps and other products bendable but may also adversely impact human reproductive development and health.  As plastics slowly break down, these phthalates would leach into the surrounding environment. So, the two young scientists tackled the problem and ultimately discovered strains of bacteria that have the potential to naturally degrade phthalates. Their work earned a regional first place in British Columbia for the 2012 Sanofi BioGENEius Challenge Canada, as well as a special award for the most commercial potential at the contest’s finals.

     
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Center for Family Conversations

The Center for Family Conversations (CFC) is a resource center that provides the integral tools and ideas in helping families establish a 100-year-plus Family Legacy Plan.

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