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New Physics of Philanthropy by Dr. Paul Schervish

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A new set of vectors now surround donors. Akin to the vectors of physics, these new vectors include the tendency of donors to (1) seek out rather than resist venues for charitable giving, (2) approach their philanthropy entrepreneurially, meaning they seek personally to make a creating and distinctive impact, (3) consider that care for the needs of others is a path for their own self-fulfillment, and (4) view philanthropy as a key ingredient of the financial morality they wish to live and impart to their children. These vectors increasingly become allies, not enemies to overcome. They represent how material and spiritual wherewithal come together as a more important aspect of moral biography for a larger number of individuals. In my view, people are inclined to seek happiness; and therefore live a gospel of life. Second, they are their own best teachers since they have to internalize the meaning and goals of life, including philanthropic decision, for themselves. Finally, there is a new inclination for people to see how their gospel of life is directly connected to financial care and philanthropy: for themselves, their children, their churches, and their world.

 

Why People Give Using the New Physics of Philanthropy?

 

1) Discernment

Discernment in the realm of philanthropy has a two-fold mission: to help people discern from their own perspective their financial capacity and their charitable aspirations, that is their empowerment and moral compass. To accomplish this without the imposition of law, discernment needs to be exercised in an atmosphere of liberty and inspiration. 

 

There are several steps in carrying out the conscientious self-reflection and decision making associated with spiritual discernment. First, discernment helps individuals to uncover for themselves their financial capacity by clarifying their resource stream and their expense stream. Discernment around the resource stream clarifies what financial resources are available now and in the future. Discernment around the expense stream clarifies what resources are needed to achieve the standard of living individuals’ desire for themselves and their children. This requires conscientious considerations about current and future consumption. Any positive gap between resources and expenses provides a potential for charitable giving, and relative financial security, and liberates an inclination towards charitable giving. 

 

2) Identification

 

Through hundreds of interviews with wealth holders and middle income individuals, I have found that the key motivation for charitable giving is not selflessness but the identification of self. Our modern notion of altruism was developed in part to counter the utilitarian concept of human nature revolving around the rational calculation of self-interest. A deeper alternative is to think about the quality of self rather than the absence of self. Thomas Aquinas suggests a different way to rethink the issue of self. Rather than eliminating the self, Aquinas speaks instead about the unity of love of God, love of neighbour, and love of self. The key is the identification of my self with the fate of others as if it were my own. 

 

3) Gratitude

 

By probing further into “why people give” with the question, “Why are you grateful?” donors will invariably report their experiences of blessing, gift, luck, fortune, or grace for which they have not been responsible and did nothing to deserve. 

 

First published in “Better Than Gold: The Moral Biography of Charitable Giving” 2003 

 

 

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO DR. PAUL?

 

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Paul G. Schervish is Professor of Sociology and Director of the Center on Wealth and Philanthropy (CWP) at Boston College.  Schervish served as a Fulbright Scholar for the 2000-2001 academic year at University College Cork in the area of research on philanthropy.  For the 1999-2000 academic year he was appointed Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Indiana University Center on Philanthropy.  He has been selected five times to the NonProfit Times annual “Power and Influence Top 50,” a list which acknowledges the most effective leaders in the non-profit world.

 

He received a bachelor’s degree in classical and comparative literature from the University of Detroit, a Masters in sociology from Northwestern University, a Masters of Divinity Degree from the Jesuit School of Theology at Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

The Giving Pledge – WARREN BUFFETT

The Giving Pledge – WARREN BUFFETT

 

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“Were we to use more than 1% of my claim checks (Berkshire Hathaway stock certificates) on ourselves, neither our happiness nor our well-being would be enhanced. In contrast, that remaining 99% can have a huge effect on the health and welfare of others.”

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Amplify the money you give | Kat Rosqueta

Amplify the money you give | Kat Rosqueta

 

 

 

The word “philanthropist” evokes the names of billionaire donors – Rockefeller, Gates, Pew – but in reality, most charitable giving comes from regular people giving smaller amounts. How can you, the non-billionaire, do the most good with what you give? Kat Rosqueta shows how to become a high-impact philanthropist, with a few tips for getting more engaged with your donations – one dollar, one cause, at a time.

Kat Rosqueta wants to reclaim the word “philanthropist.” She believes the word is not just for Rockefellers; rather, a philanthropist is anyone who gives money, time or skill with the goal of helping make the world better, at any scale.
Rosqueta is the founding executive director of The Center for High Impact Philanthropy, part of the School of Social Policy & Practice (SP2) at the University of Pennsylvania. Her group works to collect and report data from charities, to show philanthropists how well they are doing at giving. Beyond simple metrics like staff overhead, everyone wants to know: does our chosen charity make a difference?

From One Elephant to Another by Daryle Doden

From One Elephant to Another by Daryle Doden

 

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Do you feel the target on your back? Do you sometimes sense that everyone wants a piece of you?

 

Speaking at a conference for nonprofit development people, I watched a presenter offer instructions on the care and feeding of elephants – mega donors. Much of what he said was accurate and helpful. But I couldn’t shake the feeling that I was a marked man.

 

It’s one thing to be sought because of who you are as a person – one who thinks and collaborates for noble purposes. It’s quite another to be hunted because of what you have, your resources – your tusks.

 

With great privilege comes great responsibility. I get that. I want to meet my family’s needs. I want to be a good steward – no, I want to be an excellent steward…..Most of us want that. The WHAT and WHY are the easy parts. It’s the HOW that conceals all the snakes in the grass.

 

 

To learn more about the Center for Family Conversations and the new book, Unheritage, click here.

 

 

 

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO DARYLE?

 

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Daryle is a lifelong entrepreneur who along with four partners founded Ambassador Steel Corporation in 1974. The founders had a common goal of business success while living out their faith without compromise in the marketplace. When the company sold in 2008, it was the largest independent distributor and fabricator of rebar in the United States with annual revenues surpassing $500 million and a reputation of faith, integrity, and excellence.

 

Daryle was raised in a pastor’s home in northern Indiana. He received a diploma in Sacred Music from Moody Bible Institute where he met his wife Brenda. He continued his education at Bethel College, Mishawaka, Ind., earning a B.A. in Biblical Studies and Musical Performance.

 

Daryle has served on the boards of Cedarville University and Lakewood Park Baptist Church, as well as on the DeKalb County Council. He also served on the alumni board of his alma mater, Moody Bible Institute, and is currently a member of the DeKalb County YMCA and Wagner-Meinert boards. Daryle and Brenda have five children and eight grandchildren with a ninth on the way.

 

 

The Giving Pledge – CHARLES R. BRONFMAN

The Giving Pledge – CHARLES R. BRONFMAN

 

 

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Philanthropy is in the DNA of my family. My parents were both active participants in Jewish, local Montreal and Canadian charities. The dining table conversation was a place for discussing what was important to them in that world…it is no surprise then, that each of us has contributed to society.”

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Chuck Feeney – Recipient Of The Forbes 400 Lifetime Achievement Award For Philanthropy

Chuck Feeney: Recipient Of The Forbes 400 Lifetime Achievement Award For Philanthropy

 

Warren Buffett commends the founder of Atlantic Philanthropies, an organization that has pledged more than $6.5 billion in grants to promote education, health, peace and human dignity throughout the world. 

Joining a Nonprofit Board Without a Financial Obligation

Joining a Board Without a Financial Obligation

 

Most nonprofit boards are required to secure adequate resources for an organization. However, not every board member can make a substantial financial contribution. Stanford GSB alumni and industry experts share the various roles, contribution levels, and additional options for individuals interested in board service, but are unable to meet steep giving policies. Business leaders and Stanford GSB alumni shared their insights at the 2014 GSB Nonprofit Board Governance Institute at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. 

How a Nonprofit Board Changes as the Organization Evolves

How a Nonprofit Board Changes as the Organization Evolves

 

 

Nonprofit boards can provide everything from governance expertise to task oriented volunteer support. Stanford GSB alumni and industry experts share insights into how the role of the board member changes as an organization grows and evolves. Business leaders and Stanford GSB alumni shared their insights at the 2014 GSB Nonprofit Board Governance Institute at the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

A Conversation with Jean Case

A Conversation with Jean Case

 

CEO, The Case Foundation

 

The Giving Pledge – ELI AND EDYTHE BROAD

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“Those who have been blessed with extraordinary wealth have an opportunity, some would say a responsibility – we consider it a privilege – to give back to their communities, be they local, national or global.”

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