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The Myth of Communication: Roger Graef OBE

The Myth of Communication: Roger Graef OBE

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We assume when we try to communicate that the other person(s) will get the message in every sense of the word. But this is wishful thinking. Professor Roger Graef explores how dangerous it is to assume that the recipient has taken both the words and the intention in the form you would wish. It’s not just a matter of language, or erratic technology – spam isn’t just a technical problem. It’s a state of mind.

Professor Roger Graef OBE is an award winning film-maker, criminologist, broadcaster and writer. He is best known for his unstaged observational films in normally closed places like government ministries, corporation board rooms, international institutions including the EU and UN, as well as prisons, probation, special schools, and social work.
Many of his films have influenced business, diplomacy, policing, social and criminal justice policy. Most recently, THE TROUBLE WITH ADOPTION: A Panorama Special helped the government promise of speedier adoptions. Other recent films include THE TROUBLE WITH PIRATES about Somalia, and GREAT ORMOND STREET, following consultants making ground-breaking life and death decisions, and the online project CERNpeople, short films for Google using access to CERN in Geneva. All these were created through his production company Films of Record.
He was a founding board member of Channel 4, was on the board of London Transport and co-designed the bus map., He is currently one of three commissioners on the RIBA Future of Homes Commission.
He writes and broadcasts regularly on social and criminal justice and communications. He is the author of TALKING BLUES, Police in their Own Words, LIVING DANGEROUSLY: young offenders in their own words, and WHY RESTORATIVE JUSTICE?
In 2004 he was the first documentary maker awarded the BAFTA Fellowship for lifetime achievement.
In 2006 he was given an OBE.
He was News International Visiting Professor of Communications at Oxford University, and is now Visiting Professor at the Mannheim Centre for Criminology at the LSE. He has been an Independent Advisor to the Metropolitan Police on race since 1999, and is an advisor to the Sentencing Council. He is currently Chair of the Media Standards Trust, and the theatre company Complicite.

Power Of Pause : Sneha Iype Varma

Power Of Pause : Sneha Iype Varma

 

Secrets of body language

Secrets of body language

Gestures, facial expressions and body movement compose ninety-three percent
of communication–only seven percent of understanding derives from words.
Experts in non-verbal signals will deconstruct video footage of people from
iconic moments in history, past and present, to reveal what was truly being
said. Learn how subtle movements are used to persuade masses, establish power,
and advance careers–most often without anyone knowing it.
All Rights Reserved to History Channel

 

Fitness for Leadership — Greg Amundson

Fitness for Leadership — Greg Amundson

Attendees discovered how the power of our thoughts and words can make the difference in our ability to lead, educate and inspire others. In this session, we will talk about how to use your body to influence your mind, “feed your dog of courage,” breathe for power, and believe unconditionally in yourself and the ability of others.

A bad attitude is like a flat tire

A bad attitude is like a flat tire. You can’t go anywhere until you change it.

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Your Family is your business, Mankind is your business

Your Family is your business, Mankind is your business

 
Enzo Bio Picture
 

by Enzo Calamo

 
As this is the Holiday season, I want to wish everyone a very Merry Christmas.
 
The other night I was watching Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol movie starring George C. Scott as Scrooge. One of the most impactful moments in the movie is when Scrooge tells Marley’s ghost, “But you were always a good man of business, Jacob.” Upon which Marley’s ghost cries out in anguish:
 
Business! Mankind was my business. The common welfare was my business; charity, mercy, forbearance, and benevolence were all my business. The dealings of my trade were but a drop of water in the comprehensive ocean of my business!
 
With that simple statement, Marley’s ghost teaches Scrooge, and all of us, three very important life lessons:
 
1) Real assets in the world are people, not possessions;
 
2) Your family is the first place that you experience true love and care. As a baby, and as a child, whether your memories are good or bad, you were completely dependent on others. In today’s aging world, many of our seniors are also completely dependent on others again. Is it not time that we learn that love is based on our ability of loving and caring for the living, who can love us back, AND keeping alive the memories of our loved ones who left us too soon? Material things will NEVER love us back!
 
3) Fulfilling your life purpose and helping others, not accumulating profits, should be man’s highest aims.
 
In an article Nothing Beats Family, posted on www.Inspire21.com, Ridgely Goldsborough addresses the importance of family as follows:
 
I’m deeply troubled by the number of parents who wake up too late with the realization: “My children grew up too fast. In the hustle-bustle of career and corporate rat race, I missed their childhood.” What they fail to say but too often inwardly think causes me even more pain: “…and I barely even know them.”This applies to couples as well – so in a hurry to get who-knows-where – a destination seldom defined. Relationships turn into co-habitations, romance into convenience. Very disturbing.
 
A hundred years from now, no one will remember the size of your bank account, the car you drove or the square footage of your house. The world might differ greatly however, based on your impact in the life of a small child. Your life will most certainly improve, if you pay attention to your significant other, make the choice to put her or him first. Your example will benefit the rest of us. Our world cries out for role models and heroes of every day living. What could you do today to let your loved ones know how much they mean to you? What will you do tomorrow? And the next day?
 
The following inspirational story, by author Jeff Davis at the Brobdingnagian Bards, further highlights the importance of spending time with loved ones:
 
The older I get, the more I enjoy Saturday mornings. Perhaps it’s the quiet solitude that comes with being the first to rise, or maybe it’s the unbounded joy of not having to be at work.  Either way, the first few hours of a Saturday morning are most enjoyable.
 
A few weeks ago, I was shuffling toward the basement shack with a steaming cup of coffee in one hand and the morning paper in the other. What began as a typical Saturday morning, turned into one of those lessons that life seems to hand you from time to time. Let me tell you about it.
 
I turned the dial up into the phone portion of the band on my ham radio in order to listen to a Saturday morning swap net. Along the way, I came across an older sounding chap, with a tremendous signal and a golden voice. You know the kind-he sounded like he should be in the broadcasting business.  He was telling whoever he was talking with something about “a thousand marbles”.
 
I was intrigued and stopped to listen to what he had to say. “Well, Tom, it sure sounds like you’re busy with your job. I’m sure they pay you well but it’s a shame you have to be away from home and your family so much. Hard to believe a young fellow should have to work sixty or seventy hours a week to make ends meet.  Too bad you missed your daughter’s dance recital.”
 
He continued, “Let me tell you something Tom, something that has helped me keep a good perspective on my own priorities.”
 
And that’s when he began to explain his theory of a “thousand marbles.” “You see, I sat down one day and did a little arithmetic. The average person lives about seventy- five years. I know, some live more and some live less, but on average, folks live about seventy-five years.”
 
“Now then, I multiplied 75 times 52 and I came up with 3900 which is the number of Saturdays that the average person has in their entire lifetime.  Now stick with me Tom, I’m getting to the important part.”
 
“It took me until I was fifty-five years old to think about all this in any detail”, he went on, “and by that time I had lived through over twenty-eight hundred Saturdays.  I got to thinking that if I lived to be seventy-five, I only had about a thousand of them left to enjoy.”
 
“So I went to a toy store and bought every single marble they had. I ended up having to visit three toy stores to round-up 1000 marbles. I took them home and put them inside of a large, clear plastic container right here in the shack next to my gear. Every Saturday since then, I have taken one marble out and thrown it away.”
 
“I found that by watching the marbles diminish, I focused more on the really important things in life. There is nothing like watching your time here on this earth run out to help get your priorities straight.”
 
“Now let me tell you one last thing before I sign-off with you and take my lovely wife out for breakfast.
 
This morning, I took the very last marble out of the container. I figure if I make it until next Saturday then I have been given a little extra time. And the one thing we can all use is a little more time.”
 
“It was nice to meet you Tom, I hope you spend more time with your family, and I hope to meet you again here on the band. 75 year Old Man, this is K9NZQ, clear and going QRT, good morning!”
 
You could have heard a pin drop on the band when this fellow signed off. I guess he gave us all a lot to think about. I had planned to work on the antenna that morning, and then I was going to meet up with a few hams to work on the next club newsletter. Instead, I went upstairs and woke my wife up with a kiss. “C’mon honey, I’m taking you and the kids to breakfast.”
 
“What brought this on?” she asked with a smile. “Oh, nothing special, it’s just been a long time since we spent a Saturday together with the kids. Hey, can we stop at a toy store while we’re out? I need to buy some marbles.”
 
During this holiday season, it would be wise for us to remember the words of Robert Louis Stevenson:
 

That Person is a Success

Who has lived well,

laughed often and loved much;

Who has gained the respect of intelligent people

and love of children;

Who has filled his or her niche

and accomplished his or her task;

Who leaves the world better than he or she found it,

whether by improved poppy, a perfect poem, 

or a rescued soul;

Who never lacked appreciation of earth’s beauty

or failed to express it.

Who looked for the best in others

and gave the best he or she had.

 

Happy Holidays to everyone!!!!!!!!!

 

Guy Kawasaki: The Pillars Of Enchantment

Ron Gutman: The hidden power of smiling

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Ron Gutman reviews a raft of studies about smiling, and reveals some surprising results. Did you know your smile can be a predictor of how long you’ll live — and that a simple smile has a measurable effect on your overall well-being? Prepare to flex a few facial muscles as you learn more about this evolutionarily contagious behavior.

Ron Gutman is the founder and CEO of HealthTap, a personalized health-info site that’s currently in beta.

Why you should listen to him:

Ron Gutman is the founder and CEO of HealthTap, responsible for the company’s innovation, vision and product. Before this, he was founder and CEO of Wellsphere, an online consumer health company that developed the world’s largest community of independent health writers; it was acquired in early 2009.

As a graduate student at Stanford, Gutman organized and led a multidisciplinary group of faculty and graduate students from the schools of Engineering, Medicine, Business, Psychology and Law to conduct research in personalized health and to design ways to help people live healthier, happier lives. He is an angel investor and advisor to health and technology companies such as Rock Health (the first Interactive Health Incubator) and Harvard Medical School‘s SMArt Initiative (“Substitutable Medical Apps, reusable technologies”).

 

Lisa Blake – Breath As Inspiration

To explore the connection between breath, air, and the word inspiration: “We are what and how we breathe, so paying attention to breath and air quality is crucial. We can live for weeks without food, days without water, but only minutes without breath.” A short talk about the environment, specifically air quality, will link to the word inspiration meaning both intake of breath and the passion that leads to action. The program will conclude with the audience participating in a short breath meditation

 

Antonio Rocha – Transitions in Eloquence

Born and raised in Brazil, Antonio Rocha graduated Summa Cum Laude from the University of Southern Maine with a B.A. in theater. He has studied with masters such as Tony Montanaro and Marcel Marceau. His unique blend of mime and verbal narrative has been performed from Wolf Trap in Virginia to New Zealand–in over 12 countries on 6 continents.