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The Power of Yet | Carol S Dweck

The Power of Yet | Carol S Dweck

 

 

Capabilities for problem solving and for learning (or progress) have often been regarded as (inherited) components of the personality. Both Carol s Dweck and Torkel Klingberg have made quite clear, that improvements of such capabilities are supported by systematic use of appropriate training and feedback. Very essential knowledge for any parent, teacher, leader and human being in general.
 

Carol S. Dweck is a leading researcher in the field of motivation and is the Lewis and Virginia Eaton Professor of Psychology at Stanford. Her research focuses on why students succeed and how to foster their success. More specifically, her work has demonstrated the role of mindsets in success and has shown how praise for intelligence can undermine students’ motivation and learning.

 
She has also held professorships at and Columbia and Harvard Universities, has lectured to education, business, and sports groups all over the world, and has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences. She recently won the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award from the American Psychological Association, one of the highest awards in Psychology, as well as six other lifetime achievement awards. Last Spring, the White House held an conference on her work and both President Obama and Michelle Obama refer to her work in their speeches on education.
 
Her work has been prominently featured in such publications as The New Yorker, Newsweek, Time, The New York Times, and The London Times, and the Manchester Guardian, with recent feature stories on her work in the San Francisco Chronicle and the Washington Post, and she has appeared on such shows as Today, Good Morning America, NPR’s Morning Edition, and 20/20. Her bestselling book Mindset (published by Random House) has been widely acclaimed and has been translated into over 20 languages.

Expect Problems as We Explore Possibilities | Mark Pollock

Expect Problems as We Explore Possibilities | Mark Pollock

 

In this talk, Mark shares his remarkable journey while exploring the frontiers of spinal cord injury recovery. He is the world’s leading test pilot of Esko Robotic Legs. 

Unbroken by blindness in 1998, Mark went on to compete in ultra endurance races across deserts, mountains, and the polar ice caps including being the first blind person to race to the South Pole.  

Why TED Talks Don’t Change People’s Behaviors – Tom Asacker

Why TED Talks Don’t Change People’s Behaviors: Tom Asacker

 

Author and speaker Tom Asacker wondered why so many people watch TED talks and yet so few change their behaviors as a result. His answer? That only one of three elements of our irrational, but innately human, decision-making process truly makes for lasting change.

Chris McKnett: The investment logic for sustainability

Chris McKnett: The investment logic for sustainability

 

Sustainability is pretty clearly one of the world’s most important goals; but what groups can really make environmental progress in leaps and bounds? Chris McKnett makes the case that it’s large institutional investors. He shows how strong financial data isn’t enough, and reveals why investors need to look at a company’s environmental, social and governance structures, too.

Chris McKnett helps institutional investors put money toward sustainable and socially-forward assets. 

 

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO HIM?

 

At State Street Global Advisors, Chris McKnett thinks deeply about how large investors, like banks, pension funds and endowments, can put their money in the right places — not just for better business, but for a better world. In his role as the head of State Street Global Advisors’ Environmental, Social and Governance Investing (ESG), McKnett develops sustainable-strategic products and integrates sustainability thinking directly into the investment process.

The Gift of Adversity: Norman Rosenthal

The Gift of Adversity: Norman Rosenthal

 

adversity norman rosenthal

 

Norman Rosenthal is the world-renowned psychiatrist, researcher and best-selling author, who first described seasonal affective disorder (SAD) and pioneered the use of light therapy as a treatment during his 20 years at the National Institute of Mental Health.

A highly cited researcher, he has written over 200 scholarly articles, and authored or co-authored eight popular books. These include Winter Blues, the New York Times bestseller Transcendence, and The Gift of Adversity. Listed as one of the Best Doctors in America, he has practiced psychiatry for over three decades, and has coached people from all walks of life — such as corporate leaders, athletes and actors.

Rosenthal has conducted numerous clinical trials of medications and alternative treatments, such as Transcendental Meditation, for psychiatric disorders. He and his work have been featured on Good Morning America, The Today Show, NPR and other national media. 

The Trust Economy: David Etheredge

The Trust Economy: David Etheredge

 

the trust economy

From stints at Walt Disney Interactive and Microprose software to the Director of International Business Development at Hasbro and as minority partner in renewable energy company, Wind Works, David Etheredge brings an eclectic mix of passion for theatre, technology know-how, and business acumen to his current venture, SavvyCard. Through SavvyCard, David leverages the growth of mobile devices to build the “trust economy”.

 

Toby Eccles: Invest in social change

Toby Eccles: Invest in social change

toby eccles

 

Here’s a stat worth knowing: In the UK, 63% of men who finish short-term prison sentences are back inside within a year for another crime. Helping them stay outside involves job training, classes, therapy. And it would pay off handsomely — but the government can’t find the funds. Toby Eccles shares an imaginative idea for how to change that: the Social Impact Bond. It’s an unusual bond that helps fund initiatives with a social goal through private money — with the government paying back the investors (with interest) if the initiatives work.

Toby Eccles has created a radical financial instrument that helps private investors contribute to solving thorny public problems.

 

WHY YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO HIM?

 

All too often, an ex-inmate walks out of prison with the exact same problems he or she walked in with: lack of skills, lack of support, no job. And they end up re-offending and back in jail. It’s an expensive problem to fix, but it’s a much more expensive one to ignore. A director at Social Finance in London, Toby Eccles explores the arbitrage between those two options.

 

In 2010, his pioneering Social Impact Bond allowed private investors to support a UK program targeting ex-prisoners who served short sentences (the limited government funding only goes to ex-inmates who served long terms). The £5m scheme, funded by 17 investors, supports training and support for 1,000 ex-inmates; if they re-offend less than a control group, the government will pay investors back, plus interest, through the savings accrued by achieving the program’s targets.

 

More such bonds are now being tried across the world, including in New York City and Massachusetts (both addressing recidivism), and extended to new fields such as development. Eccles founded Social Finance in 2007, and he oversees all of the firm’s social impact bond work, where, he says: “We are incentivised to work with the complicated and with those willing to change.” “We are incentivised to work with the complicated and with those willing to change.”

 

A Faith Based Economic Worldview

Part One – The Ideal Economy

To learn more, click here. 

 

Part Two – What Goes Wrong

To learn more, click here.

 

Part Three – Why It Goes Wrong

To learn more, click here. 

 

Part Four – Principled Reasoning

To learn more, click here. 

 

Part Five – Investment Decision Making

To learn more, click here. 

 

Part Six – Global Economy and Investment Markets

To learn more, click here. 

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