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Predicting the unexpected | Marshall Thurber

Predicting the unexpected | Marshall Thurber

 

Does a bumblebee know its purpose? Marshall Thurber, protege of Buckminster Fuller and W. Edwards Demming, suggests there is something bigger in front of us that we just don’t see.
 
Today, thousands worldwide actively use ‘Thurber Techniques’ in their daily lives. Marshall Thurber has proven his methods as a successful attorney, real estate developer, inventor, author, and visionary. He strives every day to maintain his reputation for being powerfully effective, fun, memorable, and cutting edge.
 
Marshall is an influencer whose knowledge deeply seeded the Burklyn Business School in Vermont. Founded in the late 1970s, it was designed to teach global principles of cooperation and the human potential movement learned from legendary futurist Dr. R. Buckminster Fuller.
 
Polishing off his career learning curve, Marshall founded a highly successful real estate firm with two partners in California. He continues to practice what he teaches and on October 10, he will teach what he practices on TEDxMelbourne’s stage.

What Would You Die For? | Brad McLain

What Would You Die For? | Brad McLain

 

This talk looks at the nature and impact of extraordinary experiences, especially how such experiences may change our sense of self or identity.

 

Brad is a social science research professor at the University of Colorado Boulder’s Center for STEM Learning and is co-director of The Experiential Science Education Research Collaborative. Dr. McLain is an accomplished filmmaker originally from Norfolk, Nebraska, and he attended the University of Nebraska Lincoln for part of his undergraduate education. He is a member of the board of directors for the JGI, Jane Goodall institute.

Be Persistent, Be Present, & Use Your Gift | Chef Otto

Be Persistent, Be Present, & Use Your Gift. | Chef Otto

 

 

Chef Otto is an accomplished chef whose impressive career includes world class establishments such as the Bellagio Hotel, Charlie Trotters, the Atlantis and Mardan Palace, and, most notable, the Culinary Institute of America. He started his career by volunteering as a cook in the United States Navy Submarine Force, feeding men stationed on the USS Patrick Henry in Pearl Harbor. Since then, he has cooked around the globe for Kings, Queens, Moguls, Titans, Rockstars, and World Class Athletes, yet one of his biggest thrills remains catering his 25th high school reunion. Chef Otto is an International Culinary Ambassador who finds that travel, adventure and spreading the gospel of all things food is the marrow of his soul. His passion to help feed the hungry sparked him to initiate Childhood Hunger Day in Washington, D.C. where he organized a 3-day symposium on hunger and poverty legislation on Capitol Hill. His role as a contestant on Bravo’s Top Chef provides notoriety defining his status as a champion against hunger. With hair too high for a ten gallon hat and yet to buy his first pair of cowboy boots, Chef Otto is now digging his heels in the Lone Star landscape as an adopted son. Taste the Freedom!

How Can We Help Our Future Selves? | Hal Hershfield

How Can We Help Our Future Selves? | Hal Hershfield

 

Through his research Hal Hirschfield helps us take a look at our future selves and how we may be able to better attend to the decisions we make today so we are anticipating what we may need in years to come.
 
Hal E. Hershfield is Assistant Professor of Marketing at UCLA’s Anderson School of Management. Prior to UCLA, Professor Hershfield taught at NYU’s Stern School of Business, and was a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University.
 
His research focuses on judgment and decision-making and social psychology, with a particular interest in how thinking about time can strongly impact decision-making and emotional experience.
 
Hal received his B.A. in Psychology and English from Tufts University in 2001, and his Ph.D. in Psychology from Stanford University in 2009. He was recently named a Rising Star by the Association for Psychological Science, and has received funding from the Templeton Foundation’s New Paths to Purpose Grant Program, and the Russell Sage Foundation Small Grant in Behavioral Economics.
 
His work has been published in top journals including Psychological Science, the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, and the Journal of Marketing Research. He has also contributed writing to The New York Times, the Huffington Post, Psychology Today, and Harvard Business Review.

The Power of Yes and the Wisdom of No – Jose Gerald Suarez

The Power of Yes and the Wisdom of No: Jose Gerald Suarez

 

In this empowering talk, Dr. Suarez explores the importance of the value of attainment-based thinking. He encourages his audience to focus on saying “yes” what they do want, rather than focusing on saying “no” to what they don’t want, arguing that it’s the only way to move forward. What do you want to say “yes” to?

Creating Better Tomorrows: Joe Tankersley

Creating Better Tomorrows: Joe Tankersley

 

Watch Joe Tankersley, a Futurist, speak about how the “futures that we imagine can impact the futures we create.” 

Mindy Grossman, CEO of HSN, Inc: Culture Trumps Strategy

Mindy Grossman, CEO of HSN, Inc: Culture Trumps Strategy

 

“You can’t have a sustainable organization unless you have an incredibly engaged culture,” shared CEO of HSN, Inc. Mindy Grossman in her Stanford GSB View From The Top talk. Grossman also emphasized the importance of self-awareness in achieving personal and professional success.

 

Living Life Inside Out: Eliza Williams

Living Life Inside Out: Eliza Williams

 

 

David Brooks: Should you live for your résumé … or your eulogy?

David Brooks: Should you live for your résumé … or your eulogy?

 

Within each of us are two selves, suggests David Brooks in this meditative short talk: the self who craves success, who builds a résumé, and the self who seeks connection, community, love — the values that make for a great eulogy. Can we balance these two selves? Perhaps, once we know them both. 

Teaching moments from the Winter Olympics by Hank Berkowitz

Teaching moments from the Winter Olympics by Hank Berkowitz 

2014 team canada hockey captain

Like many of us, you probably can’t tell the difference between a Double Lutz and a Triple Toe Loop. But, I’m sure you can tell the difference between a great team effort and a great team meltdown as the American men’s and women’s Olympic hockey teams demonstrated so painfully this weekend in Sochi, Russia. 
Granted, both teams lost to superior opponents. But, the way they went down in defeat was UNACCEPTABLE. As men’s team captain Zach Parise admitted: “We got outplayed. We didn’t deserve to win. I’m kind of embarrassed where we’re at now.” Zach, so are we.

If you have young people working for you, or if you’re the parent (or grandparent) of young athletes, please make sure they understand that “USA” stands for the United States of America—not “Uninspired Sports Association.” 

Lesson No. 1

Let’s start with the women. With four minutes left in the gold medal game against Canada, they had a comfortable 2-0 lead which they worked very hard to earn. But, instead of staying focused till the final buzzer and running down the clock, they started thinking about how they’d look on the podium with gold medals around their necks and a worldwide audience watching them sing the Star Spangled Banner with tears in their eyes. A dumb penalty here, a bad bounce there. Next thing you know, the indefatigable Canadians tied up the game in regulation and scored again eight minutes into the overtime period to claim the top spot on the tear-filled medal podium. 

Lesson: No matter how strong, skilled and experienced your competitors, when you have them on the ropes, you don’t ever let up. Don’t let them into your market when you’ve worked so hard to carve out your niche. Don’t ever let them steal your best clients or employees, and don’t ever think you’ve got the Big Market, Big Contract or Big Client locked up until the ink has truly dried on the contract. 

 

Lesson No. 2

Now, on to the men. Unlike the women, the men’s team is composed of highly paid NHL professionals. They lost a tense 1-0 semifinal game on Friday to the eventual champions, Canada. But, instead of showing some pride in the bronze medal game against Finland, they’d played like an amateur team that had already packed its gear and checked out of Sochi. Their uninspired 5-0 drubbing at the hands of the highly motivated Finns sent the U.S. hockey program home medal-less and back to the proverbial drawing board. 

Lesson: You’re never as good or as talented as you think you are and you never underestimate or disrespect your competition. You’re not always going to land the Big Contract, Big Client or Big Speaking Gig that you worked so hard to get. But, when the next opportunity comes around, you can’t waste time lamenting “the one that got away;“ you have to be ready to land the next one.



Conclusion



Congrats to Finland and Canada (twice) for winning with class and for putting their big contracts and Stanley Cup aspirations on hold to represent their countries with pride. That’s what the Olympics is all about.