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Daily Archives: January 3, 2013

If you want to live a happy life, tie it to a goal, not to people or objects – Albert Einstein

If you want to live a happy life, tie it to a goal, not to people or objects – Albert Einstein

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The expert in anything was once a beginner

The expert in anything was once a beginner

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Fun is the Future: Mastering Gamification

Fun is the Future: Mastering Gamification

Gamification is fundamentally rewriting the rules of engagement for product design and marketing. From Foursquare to Farmville and from Nike to the Navy, game mechanics like points, badges, levels, challenges, rewards and leaderboards are being used in ever greater numbers. But what does this mean for “traditional” marketing & UI/UX and how do you leverage this trend in your engagement strategy? Moreover, how do we measure success, and why will every company have a Chief Engagement Officer in the next few years? Find out more in this in-depth discussion with Gamification Expert, Gabe Zichermann — author of “Game-Based Marketing” and the Gamification.co blog, and Chair of the Gamification Summit.

GABE ZICHERMANN is an author, highly rated public speaker and serial entrepreneur. His most recent book,Game-Based Marketing (Wiley, 4/2010) has achieved critical and industry acclaim for its detailed look at innovators who blend the power of games with brand strategy. His next book on game mechanics is a detailed technical look at architecture and implementation. Gabe is also the Chair of the Gamification Workshops and Summit, upcoming events that bring together the leading minds in Gamification and Engagement Science – http://gsummit.com. A resident of NYC, Gabe is a board member of StartOut.org, advisor to a number of startups and Facilitator for the NYC chapter of the Founder

 

Jeff DeGraff – Competing Values Framework

Jeff DeGraff – Competing Values Framework

Yellow (Part 1)

Jeff DeGraff Explains the Competing Values Framework – “Collaborate” – at an Executive MBA program at the Ross Business School, University of Michigan

Blue (Part 2)

Red (Part 3)

Green (Part 4)

 

Jeff DeGraff: Breakthrough Innovation and Organic Growth (Create)

Jeff DeGraff: Breakthrough Innovation and Organic Growth (Create)

Jeff DeGraff: Breakthrough Innovation and Organic Growth (Create)

Green (Create) Characteristics:
–Visionary thinkers
–Big-picture thinkers and experimenters
–Surrounded by diverse people
–Quick and charismatic
Short attention span / unfinished projects
–Reliance on predictions and forecasts
–Ignore rules (hard to manage)
–Unique/ Individual/ Different
Embrace diversity and work with outside organizations
–Constant novel / new experimentation
–Inattention to detail

Green (Create) Optimal Environments:
–Multiple stimulating projects
–Flexible (and free of direction and management)
–Unorthodox work schedule
–“Greenhouse” funds in budget
Independent and group scenarios

Companies with Green (Create) Characteristics:
–Pixar
–Apple
Genentech

 

Jeff DeGraff: Organizational Culture and Competency (Collaborate / Yellow)

Jeff DeGraff: Organizational Culture and Competency (Collaborate / Yellow)

Jeff DeGraff, Dean of Innovation
Organizational Culture and Competency (Collaborate / Yellow)

Jeff DeGraff: Revenue, Profits, and Speed (Compete / Blue)

Jeff DeGraff: Revenue, Profits, and Speed (Compete / Blue)

Jeff DeGraff, Dean of Innovation
Revenue, Profits, and Speed (Compete / Blue)

Now let’s talk about the compete quadrant or the blue quadrant which is all about revenue and it’s all about going really fast. Well, being a business school professor I could tell you a lot about this quadrant because that’s what we train MBAs to be, right? They’re these kind of hard charging, look for the money, find it, show the revenue, pay the shareholders, get after it. Well these people are very goal and action oriented. It’s all about getting after it right now and they’re very much impatient. They’re very matter-of-fact. They’re very aggressive. They’re extremely competitive so everything is kind of a race with each other. They’re very decisive so they don’t take a lot of time to make decisions and they’re very challenging.

 

Jeff DeGraff: Large Scale Efficiency and Replicable Quality (Control / Red)

Jeff DeGraff: Large Scale Efficiency and Replicable Quality (Control / Red)

Jeff DeGraff, Dean of Innovation

–Now let’s take a look at the control position, the control competency, the control culture. Let’s look at the type of leaders, workplaces and practices that we need in order to create that incremental form of innovation that’s highly optimized. Remember, we’re looking for efficiency here and quality here. It’s going to be highly optimized so it’s not going to be radical innovation but there’s gonna be almost no risk in this form of innovation in the red position which is the opposite of the green position.

 

John Seely Brown: Pursuing Passion to Increase Potential

John Seely Brown: Pursuing Passion to Increase Potential

I would rather hire a high-level World of Warcraft player than a NBA from Harvard. Why is a game, a massive multiplayer game that has maybe 12 million people or more playing it like the World of Warcraft so important at both the individual level and maybe at the corporate level?

To understand these massive multiplayer games like World of Warcraft, do not think about it as just game play, but look at the social life on the edge of the game.

On a typical night there will be approximately 15,000 new strategic ideas created about the world. If you want to compete that night or the next day, somehow you have to appropriate in your own play what 15,000 new ideas mean to you in order to go into the high-end raid.

Most of these high-end performance groups in World of Warcraft create guild; you have to have a guild to do anything because it’s fundamentally a collaborative game. These guilds will be sometimes 100, 200 people. Guess what? They don’t have a bonus structure to guide them to incent them. Only passion, only interest works. And what you have to have is find a way to turn this guild structure of several hundred people into knowledge refining groups.

So basically self-organizing to some extent, things start to happen particularly groups go off and say, “I’m going to study this, I’m going to study this, I’m going to try this idea out and by tonight I will have consolidated all this class of ideas about how this particular new magic potion might actually work to re-heal you faster, blah, blah, blah.”

So what we’ve done is we’ve turned this entire kind of social organization into an ideation structure and an idea refinement structure all as more or less self-organizing groups. Show me anything that happens in the corporate world that has 15,000 new strategic ideas. Possibly biotech does, but no world I know about in the corporate world. We think about ten new ideas already overloading us, 10,000 is unthinkable.

When we look in to the social structures and the knowledge capability, refining and generation capabilities of this guild structures, there is something going on here. Now, these are not just self-organizing groups. Basically every high-end guild has a constitution. The leaders of these guilds also have to do dispute adjudication all the time. They also have to be willing to say, “Let’s measure ourselves.”

These guilds are truly meritocracy based. So even if you were the leader of this particular high-end raid, at the end you do an after action review and the after action review each person is open to total criticism by everybody else. You can replay the whole thing because basically its all computer meditated so it can be captured.

But equally interesting to me is you can’t play in these complex worlds without building dashboards. And these are dashboards that are measuring you, are measuring your state of being. They also measure all the things happening around you. Now let’s step back a moment. Every corporate situation I’ve ever been in has dashboards. These dashboards are measurements that are superimposed on you by your manager. So we live in a world of measurement and basically said if it’s not measured it won’t get done. You’ve probably heard that before by many people you discuss. And isn’t it interesting that all those measurements are decided by your boss applied to you?

In World of Warcraft you invent a dashboard for yourself. So this whole idea of thinking about how do I build measurements to facilitate my own performance for me and me alone becomes very interesting. And in fact in the World of Warcraft there’s a simple mantra I encounter all the time. If I ain’t learning, it ain’t fun.

Now let’s think about re-designing the workscape for the 21st century. What does it mean to have each of us in a workscape define our own dashboard, our own source of measurements? Suppose we actually then built little groups whose sole job is to accelerate learning in our particular interest group inside the corporation. How do we start to completely turn the whole notion of what the workspace is about or the workscape I’m going to call it, about into something that becomes a talent accelerator for myself to pick up new ideas, to be able to learn faster with doing things with others and so on and so forth. These are the practices that you’ll pick up in World of Warcraft if you are in one of these high-performing guilds.

And so it is an amazing learning environment with powerful learning tools that I think we in the education world can learn a hell of a lot about and we in the management world can learn a lot about. But it gets back to this notion of passion, it gets back to this notion of curiosity and it gets back to this notion that this is an interest-driven phenomenon that unleashes exponential learning of a dimension that’s almost unimaginable any other way.

Three New Networks for the Digital Age

Three New Networks for the Digital Age

Lynda Gratton, London Business School professor, suggests ways to stay connected in an increasingly mobile world.